Customer Reviews for

The Forest Lover

Average Rating 3.5
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2012

    Worth the read

    If you enjoy reading about the Pacific Northwest, specifically British Columbia and if you enjoy art, you will enjoy this book. Our book club read this book and while we all agreed it started slowly, ultimately we enjoyed the art, the history and the book. This is the story of Emily Carr, a turn of the 20th century Canadian artist who spent much of her life trying to preserve the totems and spirit of the Native Americans of BC. Her work is very important in Canadian art history. While there are some fictitious characters in the book, Vreeland has researched extensively using Carr's own journals for information. This book was not on my radar until our book club chose it. It was a great choice and an interesting read. So glad I read it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 21, 2009

    Excellent reading!

    Not a page-turner, but delightful reading. Learning about Emily Carr's life, her utter delight in nature and how to transfer her vision to canvas. Has inspired me to visit her home and surroundings, view her paintings and the awesomeness which is British Columbia.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 29, 2011

    Enjoyable book fascinating!

    Fascinating story of a painter I knew little about. I couldn't put the book down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    An excellent read.

    I picked this up out of a bargain bin for something to read on a plane. It was a little slow in the beginning, but after the first chapter, I found it very captivating and hard to put down. Emily Carr was an amazing woman, and Vreeland depicted her very well. An overall nice read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2004

    Potlatches banned?!

    Such is the dominance of US literature and culture over Canada that it can be difficult for non-Canadians to appreciate its history. Reinforced when considering British Columbia. Traditionally, Canadian culture has been centred on Ontario and Quebec. A third handicap is when a subject or backdrop is the native tribes of BC, who often rate cursory mention. Vreeland tries to remedy this by giving us a work of historical fiction, set in the first 2 decades of the twentieth century, amongst these tribes. Her book is also a searing social commentary on the deprivation and misery endured by the tribes. Afflicted by disease and a demoralisation brought on by British conquest. In the book are depictions of a crusading Christian church and a local government bent on a coerced assimilation of the natives. To such extent that in this period, potlatches were banned?! As symbols of heathen superstition and backwardness. Students of history will see echoes in similar policies carried out against the Australian Aborigines and the tribes of the US. Yes, this book is fiction. But perhaps it belongs in the same ranks as 'Oliver Twist', which Dickens wrote as a contemporary denunciation of nineteenth century British poverty.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2004

    A READING RICH IN TIMBRE

    A stage background in Shakespearean plays may be what gives voice performer Karen White's voice a richness of timbre so appropriate for this story. Further, she reads the life of an iconic artist with sympathetic understanding while not at all detracting from the courage and determination that defined this remarkable woman, Emily Carr (1871-1945). With messianic zeal Carr was determined to paint the incomparable totem poles carved and decorated by the Indians of British Columbia. Years ahead of her time she chose to do this with bold colors in modular, expressionistic depictions. Following her calling much to the distress and recrimination of her family and the society of her day, she became an art teacher who decried traditional ways. In this fictionalized portrait of the extraordinary artist Susan Vreeland (Girl in Hyacinth Blue and The Passion of Artemisia) traces Carr's travels into the deepest wilderness to meet an indigenous people. While many of her journeys were solo undertakings she did have friends and compatriots, among them were Sophie, A Native American basket maker, Harold, a missionary's son, and Fanny an Australian painter. Later Carr went to Paris where in 1911 she became a part of the avant garde artists who were developing modernism and cubism. With her third such novel Vreeland once again brings to unforgettable life another time, another place, and an extraordinary individual.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    In her inspiring biography of Canadian artist Emily Carr, Susan

    In her inspiring biography of Canadian artist Emily Carr, Susan Vreeland introduces us to a determined and self-directed young woman in such an engaging way that immediately, a sense of friendship with this brave, gutsy and talented Canadian artist is formed. Emily's family life (I visited her family home in Victoria) was distressing and difficult, and yet, despite all of her disappointments, Emily sought her own happiness in her art discipline, even during a long period when she had to rent rooms, cook meals for her roomers, and board dogs to make ends meet, Emily found a way to decorate all of Canada with her magnificent art. A wonderful biography!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2006

    Okay for no gore.

    The book was good for no battle scenes but a little bland. There was alot of sadness and no true living. She made no lovers, created no passion other than in her art that really didn't touch anyone but herself. The one friend she did make was of different cultural living so they in reality never could have been as close as the author related.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2004

    Not as good as Vreeland's others

    Normally I'm a huge fan of Susan Vreeland. I loved Hyacinth Blue and the Passion of Artemesia. I really looked forward to the Forest Lover but was very disappointed. I found the book very boring and could not get into it at all. I knew nothing of Emily Carr before reading this book and did not find her to be an interesting character. Normally I finish a book like this in a few days. I was so bored with this book that it took me 2 months to finally force myself to see it to the end.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2004

    America's Take on Emily Carr

    As this was my first Emily Carr biography written by an American author, I was immediately curious about whether or not we would do this unique character justice. The answer is a resounding no. Vreeland uses fictional sexual relationships in attempt to keep the reader from noticing her lack of strong facts. Carr is poorly represented here. She is shown as a horny and selfish girl instead of as the strong, solitude loving woman that she really was. Although her devotion to First Nation art is well-represented, that is one of the few aspects of Carr that is shown clearly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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