Customer Reviews for

Frankenstein: Prodigal Son

Average Rating 4
( 400 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(206)

4 Star

(124)

3 Star

(39)

2 Star

(19)

1 Star

(12)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

Phenomenal Read

Fantastic first book to this series. I was poring through the pages as fast as I could. It was a phenomenal book. I give it an A+ all the way around.

posted by Anonymous on September 7, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

reductio absurdum

It's a page turner but glosses over any of the complex arguments over bio-technology turning the narrative into one long cartoonish and reductio absurdum argument against human intervention in the natural world. Many worthwhile questions about bio-tech could be addresse...
It's a page turner but glosses over any of the complex arguments over bio-technology turning the narrative into one long cartoonish and reductio absurdum argument against human intervention in the natural world. Many worthwhile questions about bio-tech could be addressed in an interesting way: Where do you draw the line between things like braces for teeth, repairs of cleft palates, or reconstructive surgery and other more advanced forms of human enhancement? Who will get to decide that? Why should we trust them to make those decisions for ordinary people? Why would we think the gatekeepers would have better, wiser, or more insightful knowledge than the rest of us? Should those decisions be made by the federal government, the states, or just by individuals themselves? Why? Who will appoint the gatekeepers? Would Bill Clinton or Newt Gingrich be in a better position to understand what your needs or interests are than you? Even if the U.S. were to stop all experiments in bio-tech wouldn't that just leave the world's illiberal states free to continue their own experiments? What's the difference between finding ways to foster one's child's intelligence in environmental ways and doing it through engineering? Again, who gets to decide these things and why them?

posted by Anonymous on June 24, 2006

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2007

    Phenomenal Read

    Fantastic first book to this series. I was poring through the pages as fast as I could. It was a phenomenal book. I give it an A+ all the way around.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2007

    A Very Good Book!

    This book surprised me in that I thought it would be a lot different from what it is. It is WAY better than even the original Frankenstein. If you like Mr. Koontz then you'll love this book. You'll love it even if you've never read any of his books...Highly Recommended!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2006

    reductio absurdum

    It's a page turner but glosses over any of the complex arguments over bio-technology turning the narrative into one long cartoonish and reductio absurdum argument against human intervention in the natural world. Many worthwhile questions about bio-tech could be addressed in an interesting way: Where do you draw the line between things like braces for teeth, repairs of cleft palates, or reconstructive surgery and other more advanced forms of human enhancement? Who will get to decide that? Why should we trust them to make those decisions for ordinary people? Why would we think the gatekeepers would have better, wiser, or more insightful knowledge than the rest of us? Should those decisions be made by the federal government, the states, or just by individuals themselves? Why? Who will appoint the gatekeepers? Would Bill Clinton or Newt Gingrich be in a better position to understand what your needs or interests are than you? Even if the U.S. were to stop all experiments in bio-tech wouldn't that just leave the world's illiberal states free to continue their own experiments? What's the difference between finding ways to foster one's child's intelligence in environmental ways and doing it through engineering? Again, who gets to decide these things and why them?

    5 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2007

    what a great book

    I can't wait for the third book. Never put it down. One of his best.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2007

    Suprisingly Engrossing!

    Not usually a fan of these type books, but I have to say, I could not put it down until the very last page. So...I rushed right out to buy Book Two and gobbled it up in no time at all....and, I'm STILL waiting for Book Three. What's the hold-up??

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2007

    Excellent!

    what a great book! It was entertaining, suspenseful, a bit funny, just great! Praises to Koontz. I look forward to reading book 2.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2009

    A novel twist on the classic Frankenstein

    Dean Koontz puts a novel twist on the story of Frankenstein's monster. It was very interesting to place Dr. Frankenstein and his monster in modern times. The basic plot of the story is a little far fetched yet a very fun read. The Dr. is definitely evil in pursuit of the perfect world. It will be interesting to read the rest of the series to see if "the monster" plays the role of the hero. I really liked the rapport between the New Orleans detectives. This story line is a little different than most of Koontz's work, but still a very worthy read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2009

    actually we should be praising koontz's co-author

    I loooooved this book. I read it in about two days. But I know that when these big authors (clive cussler, james patterson, dean koontz) write a book with a co-author that the co-author is doing most of the work. One of Clive Cussler's co-authors (Jack Dubrul) is a friend of a friend so I have it on pretty good authority that Koontz probably didn't have much to do with this book beyond the concept. But I still highly recommend it

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 5, 2009

    Excellent book!!!

    I would highly recommend this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Loved it!

    Of course I have to start off by saying Dean Koontz is awesome. As always this book really pulled me in. This is a good twist on the classic Mary Shelley Frankenstein. I can't wait to pick up the 2nd book in the series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Frankenstein I Can Really Enjoy.

    I have never in my life wanted a book to come out so badly as I do with the third installment of Dean Koontz Frankenstein series. I've read both books one and two twice and they are now one giant story in my mind so i will try to stick with just book one for this review.

    When I originally read that this was going to be about Frankenstein in modern day North America helping out with crime I laughed. I thought of cheesy movies like Robocop and shook my head. But I gave it a shot anyways because if nothing else it would be different from what I had read, (at that time only King novels). On that assumption I was correct, on the cheesy Robocop analogy...I was dead wrong.

    The characters are all likable or loathsome and some are downright sympathetic, even some of the monsters. The plot was not Frankenstein dressed in Louisianan PD Blues running around shooting and maiming perps either. Duchaleon (Frankensteins new name, pardon my spelling)receives word that someone close to him in the freak show circuit has passed and his creator Victor Frankenstein is still alive and looking the same as the day he created Duchaleon living under the alias Victor Helios.

    Duchaleon makes his way to Louisiana and ends up entangled in two police officers hunt for a serial killer who is amputating and collecting singular body parts from women. The two cops are both excellent characters, one male, and one female, the male is a sarcastic guy and adds needed comic relief throughout and the female cop is very rough and tumble (in the mold of Deb from Showtime's Dexter).

    The story is not entirely about a serial killer and the three's hunt for him or her. The book and sequel are a multi-layered story that really grabs hold of you and never lets go. The read is so enjoyable that it reads like an epic movie. You really wont want to put it down. I recommend that if you are considering getting this book or the audio version (which is also excellent btw) that you pick up its companion book, Dean Koontz Frankenstein: City of Night as you will want to read it right away.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2009

    frankendifferent

    excellent take on the frankenstein theme! makes for great reading and you know when it ends there has to be a sequel. characters are superbly wellrounded in there strangeness. the good doctor in this book envisions a world i would not like to live in.......

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2007

    Book one of three

    Dean Koontz's Frankenstein is a modern day update of the classic novel. The story and pacing are good, and the characters are rich. The only bad thing is this is book one of three, and three has been pushed back multiple times, so you will have to wait for the conclusion.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2007

    Good

    I have a few of Dean Koontz's books and this book was pretty good. It was nothing to write home about, and not the best one I have read, but it had a decent plot. It was interesting to read about what 'really' happened to Frankenstein and his monster. I recomend this book if you just want to take time out of your life to sit down and read a good thriller.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2006

    Interesting reimagining of the Frankenstein saga

    For a book which started out as an idea for a TV series, this is really an intriguing take on Mary Shelley's now-famous story which I have so far throughly enjoyed. That being said, I have to remark how unclear I am on just how this book is suposed to fit in with Mary Shelley's universe. It would seem at first (especially from the synopses) that it is merely a continuation of the same story (just 200 years later), but the text would seem to suggest that these characters are actually part of Mary Shelley's world (and ours) as well as fictional characters in her book. I was also intrigued by the use of the names 'Jonathan Harker' and 'Dwight Frye' for the names of two of the other police officers considering the fact that the former is the name of one of the main characters in Bram Stoker's 'Dracula' and the latter is the name of the actor who played both Igor in the most-famous movie version of 'Frankenstein' (with Boris Karloff) and Renfield in the most famous movie version of 'Dracula' (with Bela Lugosi). More interesting then that is the fact that the two police detectives (O'Connor and Maddison) don't seem to notce this significance in spite of their clear familiarity with the appropriate pop culture. I am also surprised at how very stupid Victor Helios seems to be for being such a bio-technology genius (but I guess the bad guy always have to have some fatal character flaw). In any case, a very entertaining and very engrossing story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2014

    Tito Sun

    Whats going on here

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2014

    Pearlkit

    She whimpered and then started to turn and pad away singing " There a stranger in my bed. There is a party in my head. Glitter all over the room. Pink flamingos in the pool. This is like mini bar. Dj pasted out in the yard. Barbies on the barbeque. Is this a freckle or brouse? Pictures up last night ended online. We're screwed. Oh well. Its a blacked out blurr but im pretty sure it ruled. Da*m. LAST FRIDAY NIGHT!! Yah we danced on table tops. And we took to many shots. Think we kissed but i forgot. LAST FRIDAY NIGHT!! Yah we maxed our credit cards. Ended kicked out of the bar. So we hit the pool at ours. LAST FRIDAY NIGHT!! We were drinking in the park. Skinny dipping in the dark. Then met up at metric park. LAST FRIDAY NIGHT!! Yah i think we broke the law. Allways say we're gonna stop. Owao!!!!" Her voice trailed off as she walked back to camp.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2014

    T. Ally

    "Hello, Get OUT or Get HURT."

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  • Posted September 6, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Just interesting enough to keep me reading.  Not much *wow facto

    Just interesting enough to keep me reading.  Not much *wow factor* and no big reveal at the end.  That said, I want to find out what happens next so I will keep reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2014

    Gorse

    He cheered up. [Thats probably true]

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