Customer Reviews for

The Friday Night Knitting Club

Average Rating 4
( 306 )
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(115)

4 Star

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(57)

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(29)

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(19)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

A must read...so read it!

Kirkus Reviews dubbed this novel, "a Steel Magnolias for the twenty-first century." I believe Kate Jacob's The Friday Night Knitting Club to be a valiant reminder of the constant struggles entangled within the human condition and it does an impressive job in delving int...
Kirkus Reviews dubbed this novel, "a Steel Magnolias for the twenty-first century." I believe Kate Jacob's The Friday Night Knitting Club to be a valiant reminder of the constant struggles entangled within the human condition and it does an impressive job in delving into the many diverse, and more often than imagined, meaningful relationships experienced by her characters. An onslaught of characters-each attempting to make their own way in the big, bad city of New York-permeate the pages of the author's renderering of true sisterhood. The protagonist of the story is Georgia Walker, a forty year old single mother to her only daughter, twelve year old Dakota. Together, they own Walker and Daughter: Knitters; a unique yarn and knitting shop situated on busy Broadway Avenue. The shop has become an unlikely home away from home for an eclectic group of women of all generations- all searching for a refuge from their hectic and grueling lives. The club emerges as one customer lingers on a typical Friday night. The club soon becomes a haven from the perils of the harsh world they all live in. Just when it seems like all is okay with the shop and life in general, Georgia is faced with more drama than she bargained for. The story begins to spiral into a place that the reader couldn't have prepared for; and then toward the unimaginable. Even though Georgia Walker is the main character in Jacobs' plot, the reader gets a closer look into the complicated lives of six other New York women. All of these other women emerge as the foundation of a strong sisterhood in Georgia's desperate time of need. In the end, the true hero of the story reveals itself to be the Friday Night Knitting Club itself. Throughout the novel, the author offers a plethera of knitting techniques, recipes, and simple reminders of why a bond between friends is so vitally important in a person's life. This novel showcases the characters' constant struggles associated with socio-economic status, race, emotional issues and overall health. The characters develop in a way as to evoke realism, as well as to generate empathy from the reader. Bottom line- if you haven't seen Steel Magnolias, see it! And if you haven't read Kate Jacobs' The Friday Night Knitting Club, read it!

posted by ttcurphy on March 29, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

Overrated!

Whew -- I thought you had to be a good writer to get a book contract and sell a gazillion books! Clearly, a good book cover and the word "knitting" in the title are more important.

I felt like I was reading the draft of a book written by a new author. While she was...
Whew -- I thought you had to be a good writer to get a book contract and sell a gazillion books! Clearly, a good book cover and the word "knitting" in the title are more important.

I felt like I was reading the draft of a book written by a new author. While she was clearly earnest in her endeavor, she needed a really good editor to make her book shine.

There were a lot of characters in the book, and there was something about each that was almost likeable. However, they were each so lightly developed that it was like reading a book about stick figures. It enough to make the reader angry that the author didn't care enough about them to give them the flesh and bone they deserved. Fewer characters more thoroughly developed would have made for a much better book.

And as for the author's unceremonious dumping of the main character at the end of the book, all I can say is that she deserved better as well. What a waste to build a plot around this woman's life and then ditch her in all of about two pages. This was done with no creativity, very little sympathy and, as far as I could tell, without much purpose.

Overall, the book was a big disappointment. I won't be buying any more of this author's books.

posted by 1358132 on May 17, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2009

    Overrated!

    Whew -- I thought you had to be a good writer to get a book contract and sell a gazillion books! Clearly, a good book cover and the word "knitting" in the title are more important.

    I felt like I was reading the draft of a book written by a new author. While she was clearly earnest in her endeavor, she needed a really good editor to make her book shine.

    There were a lot of characters in the book, and there was something about each that was almost likeable. However, they were each so lightly developed that it was like reading a book about stick figures. It enough to make the reader angry that the author didn't care enough about them to give them the flesh and bone they deserved. Fewer characters more thoroughly developed would have made for a much better book.

    And as for the author's unceremonious dumping of the main character at the end of the book, all I can say is that she deserved better as well. What a waste to build a plot around this woman's life and then ditch her in all of about two pages. This was done with no creativity, very little sympathy and, as far as I could tell, without much purpose.

    Overall, the book was a big disappointment. I won't be buying any more of this author's books.

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 29, 2011

    A must read...so read it!

    Kirkus Reviews dubbed this novel, "a Steel Magnolias for the twenty-first century." I believe Kate Jacob's The Friday Night Knitting Club to be a valiant reminder of the constant struggles entangled within the human condition and it does an impressive job in delving into the many diverse, and more often than imagined, meaningful relationships experienced by her characters. An onslaught of characters-each attempting to make their own way in the big, bad city of New York-permeate the pages of the author's renderering of true sisterhood. The protagonist of the story is Georgia Walker, a forty year old single mother to her only daughter, twelve year old Dakota. Together, they own Walker and Daughter: Knitters; a unique yarn and knitting shop situated on busy Broadway Avenue. The shop has become an unlikely home away from home for an eclectic group of women of all generations- all searching for a refuge from their hectic and grueling lives. The club emerges as one customer lingers on a typical Friday night. The club soon becomes a haven from the perils of the harsh world they all live in. Just when it seems like all is okay with the shop and life in general, Georgia is faced with more drama than she bargained for. The story begins to spiral into a place that the reader couldn't have prepared for; and then toward the unimaginable. Even though Georgia Walker is the main character in Jacobs' plot, the reader gets a closer look into the complicated lives of six other New York women. All of these other women emerge as the foundation of a strong sisterhood in Georgia's desperate time of need. In the end, the true hero of the story reveals itself to be the Friday Night Knitting Club itself. Throughout the novel, the author offers a plethera of knitting techniques, recipes, and simple reminders of why a bond between friends is so vitally important in a person's life. This novel showcases the characters' constant struggles associated with socio-economic status, race, emotional issues and overall health. The characters develop in a way as to evoke realism, as well as to generate empathy from the reader. Bottom line- if you haven't seen Steel Magnolias, see it! And if you haven't read Kate Jacobs' The Friday Night Knitting Club, read it!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Disappointing

    I was excited about this book and then very disappointed. I couldn't connect with the characters and didn't care for her writing style.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2009

    Great idea but it ended up being depressing

    I don't want to give any spoilers, but I was looking for something uplifting and cheerful, not this.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Sweet, but predictable

    This is a sweet, easy-reading book, good for quiet stress-relieving moments. The characters are believable and likeable, but a little too contrived to cover all minorities. It didn't add to mention one was Jewish, one was Asian, one was Black. It didn'tchange the themes of the book. The plot was sweet, but don't go too deep into the relationship theme of the book. It was predictable.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 8, 2009

    The Friday Night Knitting Club

    It was an excellent book about a group of different women, gathering to knit. Different women and different lives, emotions slowly begin to form a bond. When faced with difficulites they all help each other with their different life gifts. Beautifully written. Can't wait to read the next one, Two Yarns.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 23, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Good and Not So Good All At The Same Time

    The book was an enjoyable read, especially in the middle, but it was lacking enough to be a let down.<BR/><BR/>By about 100 pages in I was really into the book. It was enjoyable and had me going back for more. The author had a way of pulling the reader into each of the characters and made me - a total non-knitter or crafter - really interested in taking up knitting!<BR/><BR/>There were a few oxymoronic elements, for example, the author was trying to portray the independence of women coming out in the face of life's challenges, while they discovered themselves and their dreams. But each woman was either independently wealthy thanks to a man or a wealthy benefactor. Nice, but neither realistic nor very independent and it certainly takes the challenge out of much of living "independently".<BR/><BR/>The ending felt distant and wasn't really engaging for me. More like the author was telling the story and not "showing" it. She pulled me in, but let me down!<BR/><BR/>I'd say still worth reading if you have it, but don't go in with high expectations."

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2010

    Not worth the wait.

    I had been waiting and waiting for this book to finally come in at my local library. They only have one copy and it is ALWAYS out. I took that to be a good sign, this book must be a good one if it is in such high demand. Unfortunately this was not the case. I found it difficult to get beyond the first several chapters. There was absolutely nothing clever about this book or the characters in it. Kate Jacobs must be laughing all the way to the bank. Writing books about knitting and cupcakes (Comfort Food), what's next a book about cats? Oh wait, Vicki Myron already did that with 'Dewey' and that wasn't very good either.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 13, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    PREDICTABLE!

    Very predictable. The only redeeming quality is that the characters are likable.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2009

    Good story line, kept me wanting to read more

    Would like very much to read other books by this author

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Good Story

    I thought the book was a good read. I did relate to the members of the knitters club, not because I knit but because I enjoy talking and shareing lifes experiences with others.
    It had some really high points and some sad things that happened to good people.
    I feel that I would tell others that it was worth reading.
    linda

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2008

    the facts

    Jacobs' debut novel is something to be commended. I wasn't too impressed with the first chapter, but by the second I was intrigued enough to continue. It's an easy read which I finished within two days and an interesting story. I knit occasionally, but not enough to make the knitting connection with the characters that they author may have intended. Still, it was a very vivid story, I thought, true to form of relationships: be they between a single-mom and her older mentor in New York or a single-mom and her co-worker here where I'm from (Kalamazoo, MI). There were many characters jumbled in this story, but isn't that so true to life? The random hodge-podge of the club is no different than my own and although a bittersweet ending, I felt it was a very real novel. Forget technical writing and character development - it's meant to portray the relationships in woman's wife so we could all relate. I think that is exactly what this novel accomplished.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2008

    Sparked the Knitter in me

    When I picked this book up in the library I was quite reluctant to reading it but needless to say once I got started it was hard to stop. I enjoyed this book greatly because I feel it was beautifully written. Along with the dialogue the message behind the book was quite inspiring because it propelled you to appreciate the true meaning of sisterhood and to reconcile with those whom have hurt you. I would read this book over and over and I am sure it will be special each time!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    COZY, WARM, AND FRIENDLY

    A bit reminiscent of Ann Hood's The Knitting Circle we are again introduced to a group of women who meet to knit and find that they've stitched strong bonds of friendship. What raises Jacobs's debut novel above the average women-support-women tale is the author's finely crafted prose and a sterling reading by Carrington MacDuffie. A recording artist and spoken word performer, MacDffie vitalizes a disparate cast of characters from Georgia Walker, a single mom and owner of a yarn ship to daughter, Dakota, to Darwin Chiu, a militant feminist, to shop staffer Peri, to Anita, Georgia's stalwart friend and helper, and more. Her narration ably reflects the different ages, backgrounds, and personalities involved. The Friday Night Knitting Club is a cozy, warm read peopled with characters we'd like to know. It's easy to lose oneself in the story and feel very much a part of the group, as we hear: 'Without ever putting up one sign or announcing the creation of a knitting club, these women began regularly appearing in the evenings and, well, loitering. Chatting with each other, talking to Anita, gathering about the large round table in the center of the room, picking up where they had left things the week before. And then, one Friday last fall, it became official. Well, sort of. Lucie, a striking woman with short, sandy-colored hair, who favored tortoiseshell glasses over her big, blue eyes and colorful, funky outfits, was an occasional shopper at Walker and Daughter. She came in every few months and was always working on the same piece, a thick cable knit sweater--a man's garment. There were a lot of these types who came in to the store, folks whose knitting ambitions were out of line with either their ability or with whatever mysterious comings and goings kept them from sitting down and getting the job done. ' And so it began. All seems to go smoothly until the reappearance of Dakota's dad who wants to move back into Georgia's life, and unexpected events in the other women's lives. Jacobs is a deft storyteller and along with the laughter and tears she has surprises in store. The Friday Night Knitting club is an affectionate, engaging story of female friendship and will soon be found on the big screen starring Julia Roberts. Enjoy! - Gail Cooke

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2014

    Wonderful read...

    It's like a girls night out with your best friends. Grab a cup of coffee, knitting project and enjoy some amazing company.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2013

    Recommended a good read

    I enjoyed this book! As a crafter it shows how much crafts plays a part in our lives!

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  • Posted May 17, 2013

    Soft and Easy Read!

    This book is for woman I think maybe a man who wants to understand woman may find this a good read.

    I love the softness of the book as the woman face all the issues in their life with the support of there Friday night knitting club.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2013

    Heartwarming Story

    Loved this book. There were lots of unexpected surprises, and kept me well interested.

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  • Posted December 26, 2012

    This book captured the feeling of knitting while pulling the rea

    This book captured the feeling of knitting while pulling the reader into the lives of the Club. The feeling I have when picking up a special ball of yarn, with no idea what I'm going to do with it, and then the accomplishment felt when the item has been finished, was echoed in the pages of this book. I felt like a member of the club, listening to the stories and growth of the women involved. Thank you B &amp; N for having this book on display in your store!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2012

    Recommened

    Good read. Makes me want to be in a knitting group!

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