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Furious

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  • Posted May 18, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    The Furies┬┐How many of you are fascinated as I am with these thr

    The Furies…How many of you are fascinated as I am with these three powerful woman who seek out vengeance upon those who have wronged individuals who were unable to fend for themselves?  There was always something about the Furies that have piqued my interest.  How they go on the hunt and instill their own justice upon the world.

    When I came across Furious by Jill Wolfson, I was ready to dive head first into a tale that promised to be full of power and judgment.  Throw in the fact that it’s three high school girls who are basically social outcasts who become the “chosen ones” who will personify the Furies of mythological proportions.

    With that in mind, I was hoping that the vengeance that these girls craved would be full of pain and suffering towards their fellow classmates and adults who have wronged them.  But instead, I find three girls who have a huge chip on their shoulders, and the way in which they started to make these people pay for their wrong doings starts off with a song.  Something about that just didn’t sit well with me.

    Throw in the one who puts them all together, who goes by the name Ambrosia, who apparently is supposed to be a fellow high school student, but instead acts and speaks in a way that is not at all teen.  I found myself having a difficult time believing that the kids at Hunter High would scramble to gain her affection and her notice.  But what I did enjoy about Ambrosia, was her voice.  Her voice was full of vengeance and wrath.  You knew what her agenda was, and that she would stop at nothing to get what she wants.  Her voice during the Stasimons in the book did exactly what it was supposed to do.  It built up the story, and summarized what the true intent of the chapters that we read were about.

    The girls chosen to be the Furies, Meg, Stephanie, and Alix were not exactly what I thought would be “Fury material”.  Sure, they have many that have wronged them and were treated unjust, but I felt like there was not enough anger in them to bring forth the wrath of the Furies.

    I went through most of the book hoping that I would see the power of the Furies, only to witness a mild comparison to the way other Furies from other books would show their power.  It appears that the way in which the Furies portrayed in Furious is by messing with people’s minds.  By burrowing deep into their inner psyche and showing their victims the way in which they treated others.  It wasn’t until near the end of the book where the mind melt that they do (by their siren song) actually does some semblance of vengeance.  Sadly, I wish that it was like this through most of the book.

    Perhaps the girls had to wean themselves into their new found power?  I wanted the hate and fury that Ambrosia personified to be in the very girls that ensure that justice was brought.

    For those who have yet to read a book dealing with the Furies, Furious by Jill Wolfson may be the beginner book to ease you into their power.  Although the power that is portrayed in the book is not as vicious as I had hoped it would be, it was still interesting to see the twist in the book where there are goddesses on earth and battling for power.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 19, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I have read my fair share of greek mythology centered around The

    I have read my fair share of greek mythology centered around The Furies. I love Elizabeth Mile's The Fury trilogy but what is different about Furious is that it is told from the POV of one of the Furious, not the victims. That alone had me really curious to read it. For the most part Furious was a very entertaining and interesting read, the only downside is that the main character had a ton of flaws and the lack of a revenge plot. 
    As with most of the greek mythologies I read, the protagonist doesn't initially know that her world is a greek mythology retelling, and this book is no exception. Don't get me wrong, I have no problem with that. However my main problem was with the main protagonist's logic and actions as well as how the whole revenge plot was handled.
    Meg is a foster kid and her foster mother treated Meg like a slave, she treated her cat 100x better. I could totally understand Meg's anger towards her as well as all the previous pent up anger and hatred for life in general because of what she went through in the foster care system. However, I just wished we delved a bit more in her past, I did get the overall picture, but I just wanted to know more, to really sympathize and invest in Meg's wellbeing. Since this is based on The Furies, another two girls were introduced to complete the trio. The other two, Alix and Stephanie, we know very little about and also find out very little about in the end. There is also an additional character in this novel and it is Ambrosia. Ambrosia is like the manager of a sports team. She was actually the one that brought the three girls together and introduced them to each other. I was able to forget about the lack of character depth because I believed that was when things get good, which is through their revenge. 
    Unfortunately, I have to say that their revenge was very bland and the same type of revenge was used for every single person they chose as their victim. This revenge scheme consisted of chanting a few songs while holding hands and making the target, i.e.: victim, start repenting and begging for forgiveness from the person/people he/she tormented/bullied/pried on. This happened every single time. The best part in the retelling of The Furies is the revenge. I was so disappointed.. I still expected something different every time they targeted someone else.. but that didn't happen. 
    I have to point out that even with all these weaknesses I still enjoyed the novel. It was a very fun and fast read. I quite enjoyed how the trio's power and need for revenge turned them into such ugly souls, worse than the people they initially wanted to take revenge on. This book isn't perfect at all but it is a decent greek mythology, especially since a ton of research done by the girls is actually mentioned so you do learn a ton. The ending had a big showdown and while I don't believe everyone who deserved punishment got what they deserved, it was a fairly good ending. I would definitely recommend it to greek mythology fans who want a quick read and the retelling told from The Furies POV. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2014

    Scorch and Bitie's Home

    Here.

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  • Posted April 18, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    'Furious' is a young adult fantasy novel that spins a modern ver

    'Furious' is a young adult fantasy novel that spins a modern version of the Greek myth of the Furies - three goddesses who were born to bring justice to the world and avenge the wronged. In the book, our main characters - Alix, a surfer girl with a quick temper; Stephanie, a modern day hippie and activist; and Meg, the quiet and mistreated foster child - come together with the help of the beautiful and mysterious Ambrosia and embody the spirits of the Furies. With their powers fully awakened, the girls set out on a mission to right the wrongs that have been brought against them and to help those who can't help themselves.

    This was an inventive and unique take on the Furies myth from Greek mythology. I loved that the author made the Furies embody everyday social outcasts in high school - these are girls who most readers can relate to in some way, so we immediately feel their misery along with their triumphs. The Furies myth is truly fascinating and I loved reading about the history behind it that was woven into the book. Although modern retellings of mythology aren't anything new in this genre, the author gave a captivating inside look at this myth and was able to breathe new life into a somewhat overdone theme. I loved the characters in the book and was able to identify with each of the girls on some level, which had me sympathizing with them and rooting for each of them throughout the novel. The writing was exceptional and very well paced, which kept me eagerly turning the pages to see what would happen next. This is a fantastic modern take on an ancient myth and a novel that fans of YA fiction will definitely not want to miss! Highly recommended!!

    Disclosure: I received a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

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