Customer Reviews for

The Further Observations of Lady Whistledown

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2004

    Enoch * * Hawkins * * * * * Ryan * * * * Quinn *

    The way in which JQ blended the characters into the stories was very well done. However, I didn't like Lady Whistledown. I found her columns mundane, but she did at least keep good dates. SUZANNE ENOCH: Lady Anne was not much more than an innocently spoiled, aimless girl. She seemed to have a warm and depthful relationship with her father, but it never really developed into anything. Anne's 'farmer' was fine; handsome, smart and dedicated. At the skating party, servants in socks emerged on the frozen Thames pushing carts of food & wine. PUH-leez! Just how pretentious were these Morelands, anyway? KAREN HAWKINS: She was the best writer, very witty, very talented. Liza was selfless, funny, and lovely, with a wonderful outlook on life. Sir Royce Pemberly was a perfect, perfect man. He was also the sexiest; read that romantic litte scene on page 149! (He reminded me of another dark-haired hero; Jason Bradford, in 'The Rose of Enchantment', so averse to marriage, and didn't know a good thing when he had it. In fact, he was a bit more sexy, smart and all-around a wonderful man. MIA RYAN: Caroline or Linney. I much preferred Caroline. Anyway, she deserved happiness. The synopsis told us that Lord Darington had evicted her, yet when he found out from his friend how it came about, he never once discussed it with Caroline or her mother. Wouldn't these women have wanted an explanation to an event that had drastically altered their lives? It shouldn't have been important to me as a reader, but darn it, I wanted to know! Anyway, Lord Darington was the second best hero of these stories. Wow, he was handsome. JULIA QUINN: Susannah was a doll, and at first David, Lord Renminster came across as a classy, strong, intriguing man who could take on the world if need be - until the skating party. He argued with his brother, Clive, but came off rather wimpy to me. And the dialogue between them was ridiculous. So cliche. They almost come to blows, but then they started to joke around. Huh? During another argument, they do the exact same thing. Both arguments were far too vicious to suddenly turn humerous. It was so out of place. Then she turned David into a 'nerd,' for lack of a better word. Having just made love to Susannah 'he let out a triumphant shout.' What a goofy thing to have a hero say. One more example: When they discussed their mutual feelings, HE began to cry. She didn't. Nothing wrong with a man crying, of course, but he came across as weak, not sentimental. I don't know about JQ's other heros, but if they are like David, she needs to make her heros sensitive, yet cool, not dorky.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 26, 2013

    Beauifully blended

    Beautifully blended from one story line to the next. A wonderful read! Not to be missed if you are a fan of Whistledown or any of the authors.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    four well-written historical romance tales

    ¿One True Love¿ by Suzanne Enoch. From the day she was born, Anne was expected to marry Halfurt, but in her almost two decades of life, nary a letter from her intended came. When Lady W writes that Anne flirts with other men, Halfurst arrives to protect what has been promised to him. ¿Two Hearts¿ by Karen Hawkins. Elizabeth and Royce are friends, but as she turns twenty-five, Liza decides to marry. Her rumored choice according to Lady W is Durham, but Royce thinks she is making a mistake. ¿A Dozen Kisses¿ by Mia Ryan. No one including Lady W knows why Terrance is in town as he never comes to London at least since his war injuries. However, Terrance, who rarely speaks, desires his distant relative Caroline, but her family thinks he is a cad and push Pellering on her. ¿Thirty-Six Valentines¿ by Julia Quinn. As reported by Lady W, Clive courted Susannah yet married Harriet. Totally humiliated, Susannah keeps her head high. Clive¿s older brother David feels his family wronged the innocent Susannah and wants to make restitution, but he is not sure how until he falls in love with her. All four well-written historical romance tales occur around Valentine Day 1814. Though the quality of the cast ranges from great to okay star, each couple leads one story and plays cameo roles in one or more of the other contributions. This along with the observations of Lady W in her latest scandal reporting (see THE DUKE AND I) add zest to the quartet that will please Regency readers. Harriet Klausner

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