Customer Reviews for

Garden of Stones

Average Rating 4.5
( 19 )
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  • Posted April 14, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This book starts with a murder, and elderly Lucy is a prime susp

    This book starts with a murder, and elderly Lucy is a prime suspect. Her daughter Patty begins to question her mother's relationship with the victim, and through flashbacks we get to know Lucy as a young girl and to learn about her mother's past relationship with the victim, as well as other secrets.

    Lucy as an adult is reserved and dignified, and she is loved and respected by her daughter Patty. However Patty doesn't really know much about her mother's past.

    But as the story goes on, we are led through Lucy's past, and the horrors she experienced during WWI. From losing her father, to the government ordering all Japanese-Americans to interment camps, and all of the horrors of the camp, these are all revealed through the story.

    As a child, Lucy was sweet and smart. But she was also confused as the world around her changed. Confused by the animosity of friends at school, the teachers, the world at large, as the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and all Japanese Americans had to bear the doubt of their own chosen country.

    Lucy's mother Miyako was a very beautiful, but a very flawed, emotionally unstable and dependent woman. It seems she married her husband in hopes that such a kind and tolerant man, and the quiet and stable life he offered, would secure her against a world she found overwhelming. She was often emotionally absent from Lucy's life, and Lucy grew to idolize and adore her father, as many young girls do. So when Lucy loses her father, she loses her bearings. And the next thing she knows, their family is being uprooted and forced to leave everything behind to move to a military-style camp in Manzanar, just for being Japanese.

    During her years in Manzanar, Lucy grows into a beautiful young lady, the spitting image of her beautiful mother, and she meets and experiences first love with a young man by the name of Jessie.

    I don't want to give too much away, so I won't reveal too much. But there were some very sweet moments, but there were also things later on that felt cut too short. I feel as if I were a little short-changed with one or two points in the storyline, but overall it was a fine story.

    I enjoyed this story. It is gently written, but realistic and hard-hitting. This provocative topic has recently become very popular, and there are a lot of books coming out now about the Japanese internment camps, and this is my first to read. And a fine introduction to this topic it was. This is a shameful period in America's history, and I can only pray that we never again repeat such mistreatment of our own citizens.

    Lucy as a young girl is an engaging child that pulls at your heart strings. You want to protect her as a young girl. As an adult, you want to free her from her past.

    My final word: This story wound up being more of a mystery than I expected. You get glimpses of things early on that slowly play out and reveal themselves, such as Lucy's scars. When you learn how beautiful she was as a girl, you wonder what happened to scar her? And who was this man from her past that is now dead? Who is the father of her daughter Patty? And then right in the end, in the final pages of the story...WHAM-O!...plot twist! And then another! And another! There were a few very nice, unexpected twists at the end that left this story very satisfying. This was definitely a worthy read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 26, 2013

    How far would you go as a mother to keep your child safe from ha

    How far would you go as a mother to keep your child safe from harm? What could you be driven to do, if like Miyako Takeda in Sophie Littlefield’s beautifully rendered and touching novel, Garden of Stones, you knew that, ultimately, you could not be there to protect your young daughter from the horrible assault you know lies in wait for her? The answers to these questions would be difficult enough under ordinary circumstances, during peace time. But for Miyako and her daughter, Lucy, who are imprisoned and subjected to the inhuman treatment those of Japanese descent endured while they were kept in the U.S. interment camps during World War II, the times are anything but ordinary. When the story opens, it is some thirty years later, and a man, an American, who was associated with the camp, is found murdered. It’s a mystery and a source of terrible concern to Patty, Lucy’s daughter, when her mother is implicated. Unaware of much of her mother’s and her grandmother’s painful history, Patty assumes her investigation into the matter will prove her mother’s innocence. But what Patty learns, through a series of shattering revelations, will alter forever her ideas about herself and her courageous and lovely mother and grandmother. In this poignant narrative, a tragic history is recounted, and the true bravery of women and mothers is explored; there is the murder of a man, too. The ending contains unexpected twists, and a haunting question: Who is really responsible? Who committed the more heinous crime?

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2013

    Touching story.

    I so love books based on true events. Learning the history was nice also.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2013

    Unique.

    Really found the history very interesting. Also, the author wrote so you cared about the characters. In addition, the twists and turns added a lot to the story. A+++++ job.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2014

    Heartwrenching

    Emotional, moving, story.

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  • Posted April 14, 2014

    This was a wonderful surprise of a story. Not what I was expecti

    This was a wonderful surprise of a story. Not what I was expecting at all. Lots of twists that I never saw coming. Full of suspense, drama, tears, heartbreak,....I loved it!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2013

    Highly recommend

    I really enjoyed this book from beginning to end... Liked the surprise ending.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2013

    Highly Recommend

    Sad but true depiction of Japanese Americans during WWII

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  • Posted April 23, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    The book travels back and forth between 1978 San Francisco and 1

    The book travels back and forth between 1978 San Francisco and 1941-43 when Pearl Harbor was attacked and Lucy and her mother were sent to Manzanar. It opens in 1978 when a former employee of Manzanar was murdered and Lucy becomes a suspect. The book is less a mystery than I thought it would be but it's other aspects kept my attention; even though it dragged a little toward the middle. How Lucy and her mother coped with their situation was a harrowing journey. I felt what they were feeling as if it was happening to me. I kept hoping things would turn out well for Lucy after all that happened to her. And I hope nothing like what happened to the Japanese-Americans ever happens again- for that was a dark time in America's history. It also had several twist endings that left me going "What the heck! I never saw that coming!". Those more made up for the lagging middle. Overall, I found it to be a heartbreaking yet also uplifting read.

    * I received a complimentary copy from the publisher via netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2013

    Highly recommended

    It was an amazing story of events that happened to the Japanese/Americans after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The mothers in the story showed such love for there children. It was great.

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    Posted July 19, 2013

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    Posted June 28, 2014

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    Posted July 5, 2013

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    Posted November 29, 2013

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    Posted April 14, 2013

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    Posted December 13, 2013

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    Posted October 4, 2013

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    Posted October 18, 2013

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    Posted June 7, 2013

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