Customer Reviews for

Gates of the Alamo

Average Rating 5
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2001

    Gates of the Alamo

    The author has filled this book with details that have surfaced since the 13 Day to Glory book came out. No battle has so inspired the world's imagination as much as this one, and no book has documented the events as well as this book. Even if you are not a Texan, or an Alamo buff, you will enjoy this read! Don't cut yourself short by ignoring this major effort!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 13, 2012

    One of the best historical novels I have ever read! Could not p

    One of the best historical novels I have ever read! Could not put it down because I just had to know what the next page contained. Highly recommend!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 4, 2011

    Highly Recommended, A must read!

    This book was wonderful rich with detail of the land. The people jumped off the pages, you could feel what they were feeling, the land they were living or traveling in came alive.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2008

    Great historical fiction!

    This is a fabulous work of historical fiction. The author gives us a very believable set of characters that range from average folks swept up in the conflict to the leading figures of the day 'Santa Anna, Houston, Travis, Crockett, etc'. Meticulous attention to historical details make this not only entertaining, but an informative read as well. I'd recommend this for anyone, whether you are a history fan or not it's a great story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2001

    Gates of the Alamo

    This is a real 'Texas' story. Steve takes Texas history and makes it come alive. I think this book should be mandatory reading for all High School Seniors in Texas! The controversial scenes after the battle of the Alamo are priceless, and the Battle of San Jacinto segment sent me back to Baytown looking at the scene of the battle again. Keep up the good work, Steve!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2001

    Brings the days of the Alamo more realistic.

    You can almost smell the blood, sweat, and tears that were shed on that horrific day. The fear and bravery of the people who fought that day will forever echo in your mind.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2001

    Recommended

    Very readable history of the Alamo told in a most human way. You get all the points of view, Texans, Mexicans, outsiders, soldiers, officers, etc. A must for any Texan and I think everyone else will enjoy it as well. Remember the Alamo!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2001

    A slave's slant on the Alamo

    My wife gave me this book as a present. I groaned: not another Alamo book! But it held me from page one to the end. A book whose reputation is going to grow. ...The supporting character who haunts me is Joe, the black slave of 26 year old Colonel William Barret Travis, leader of the Alamo's defenders. Joe is almost liberated by two Spanish soldiers early in the siege of the old mission, survives and is freed by the victorious General Santa Anna. For his troubles the new Republic of Texas declares him the property of Travis's widow. Joe flees. Is arrested as a runaway slave. And flees again to reappear (in the novel) in Mexico nearly two decades later. Joe thinks about his situation a lot. ...The south Texas coastal plains town of Refugio is one of the geographic nodes of the novel. Hobart Huson of Refugio, the late great historian of those parts, once lauded the Republic of Mexico for its unflinching, never-ending opposition to that chattel slavery to introduce which many Anglo immigrants wrenched Texas away from Mexico. 'Travis's negro'--Joe, makes it impossible to forget a shameful aspect of otherwise often glorious Texas independence.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2000

    A LOOK INTO THE PAST

    Well played out until the end. This book gave a interesting look into other peoples lifes and emotions as it centered around a major event in Texas history. Good solid enjoyable reading.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2000

    Brilliant Historical Fiction

    This novel is a must for anyone who has an interest in the Alamo. The author deftly weaves the stories of three Texians and two Mexican soldiers whose destinies meet at the fabled mission. The book's brilliance lies in its ability to combine the nuances of everday life in 1836 Texas with the historical facts of the times. We are given a first person account of battle and insight into the minds of the attackers as well as the defenders. Great book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2000

    The Alamo revisited

    A splendid retelling of the battle of the Alamo. It is on a par with 'Lonesome Dove' in story telling and characterization. The personalities are well fleshed out, from Crockett to Santa Anna. Life in Texas was never boring and this book will keep your interest from waning even beyond the last page.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2000

    Best novel of the Alamo battle

    Simply stated, Stephen Harrigan¿s The Gates of the Alamo is the best novel ever published about the Battle of the Alamo. The author drew from a deep well of background research, and he displays a sound understanding of the time, the place, and the people of Texas during the revolt of 1835 and 1836. In every possible respect this book has the ring of truth and authenticity, and it abounds with thoughtful insight. The author¿s descriptive powers are formidable, and the reader will feel the sights, sounds, and smells of a bygone world. The main characters include Texans and Mexicans, and both sides are portrayed fairly and with sympathy. The author's narration of the final battle for the Alamo probably comes as close as we will ever get to the truth of what that savage contest was like. The endpapers feature Gary Zaboly¿s two helpful aerial perspectives of the Alamo compound and San Antonio de Bexar. I recommend this book in the highest terms and without reservation!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2000

    Vibrant historical fiction

    From the first page this large and satisfying book, you know you are in the hands of a master. Stephen Harrigan not only knows his Texas history like nobody's business, but he knows how to create characters we immediately care about, and builds suspense regarding a historical event with a well-known outcome. Using a mix of Northamerican, Mexican and Tejano characters both real and imagined, we see what life in Mexican Texas was like. One major character, Edmund McGowan, is a naturalist in the employ of the Mexican government who sees no reason to break away. The mysterious end to that income sends him to Mexico City to find out what's happened. The possible breakaway of Texas is the talk of the town, and although Edmund insists that many of Mexico's Texas citizens are perfectly happy (settlers had to become citizens and Catholics in order to own land) a Mexico City barber sets him straight: 'Ah, but these days one can only be a Mexican in one's soul. It is very difficult to be a citizen when one's government is so inconstant.' Also on this trip he meets Stephen Austin, fresh from prison following his latest attempt to have a rational dialogue with Mexican president Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, and Juan Almonte, an intelligent and powerful Mexican nobleman, all of whom will play major parts later in the book. McGowan's relationship with widow Mary Mott, who runs an inn on the Texas coast, adds a deep personal note to their troubled times, as does the tie between the Mexican sergeant Blas and a mysteries Maya girl. The roster of character is large, but each one is sharply drawn and memorable. The siege of the Alamo is exciting and unromantic. Some of its heroes emerge as quite heroic, others portrayed as regular people fighting for their lives. The heroism is not confined to the defenders of the Alamo: many Mexican officers were horrified at Santa Anna's insistence on killing everyone in the fort. I'm not sure I agree with using a 1911 Alamo parade as familiar bookending device used to encase the story, but what the hell, I enjoyed reading it anyway.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2000

    A very different take on the Alamo

    This book is the story of the Alamo from the point of view of common people, caught up in a great event. It reminds me of Lonesome Dove. It also portrays Mexico in a more sympathetic light than one is accustomed to..A wonderful read...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2