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Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

34 out of 36 people found this review helpful.

You WILL be able to get things done!

GTD rests on the principle that a person needs to move tasks out of the mind by recording them externally. That way, the mind is freed from the job of remembering everything that needs to be done, and can concentrate on actually performing those tasks.

GTD is ...
GTD rests on the principle that a person needs to move tasks out of the mind by recording them externally. That way, the mind is freed from the job of remembering everything that needs to be done, and can concentrate on actually performing those tasks.

GTD is based on making it easy to store, track and retrieve all information related to the things that need to get done. Allen suggests that many of the mental blocks we encounter are caused by insufficient 'front-end' planning (i.e., for any project we need to clarify what is to be achieved and what specific actions are needed to achieve it). It is most practical, according to Allen, to do this thinking in advance, generating a series of actions which we can later undertake without any further planning.

Allen contends that our mental "reminder system" is inefficient and seldom reminds us of what we need to do at the time and place that we can do it. Consequently, the "next actions" act as an external support which ensures that we are presented with the right reminders at the right time.

The core principles of GTD are:

Collect:

The notion of stress-free productivity starts with off-loading what needs to get done from one's head, capturing everything that is necessary to track, remember, or take action on, into what Allen calls a bucket: a physical inbox, an email inbox, a tape recorder, a notebook, a PDA, a desktop, etc. The idea is to get everything out of one's head and into a collection device, ready for processing. All buckets should be emptied (processed) at least once per week.

Process:

When processing a bucket, a strict workflow is required. If it takes under two minutes to do something, it should be done immediately. The two-minute rule is a guideline, encompassing roughly the time it would take to formally defer the action.

Organize:

Allen describes a suggested set of lists which can be used to keep track of items awaiting attention, including a calendar which is important for keeping track of appointments and commitments; however, Allen specifically recommends that the calendar be reserved for the hard landscape: things which absolutely have to be done by a particular deadline, or meetings and appointments which are fixed in time and place. To-do items should be reserved for the next action lists.

Review:

The lists of actions and reminders will be of little use if not reviewed at least daily, or whenever possible. Given the time, energy and resources available at a particular moment, one must decide the most important task to be done immediately, and do it. If one is inclined to procrastinate, one may end up always doing the easy tasks and avoiding the difficult ones. To solve this, one can decide to do the actions of the list one by one, following their order, just like processing an inbox.

Do:

Any organizational system is no good if excessive time is spent organizing tasks instead of actually doing them. Allen's contention is that if one can make it simple, easy, and fun to take the necessary actions, one will be less inclined to procrastinate or become overwhelmed with too many 'open loops'.

Phew! It's a lot, but it's a lot of useful information and a foolproof system once you get it all down.

Another book that I strongly recommend because it has helped me immensely when it comes to managing myself and keeping on track is: "The Emotional Intelligence Quick Book"

posted by David_Beck on January 13, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

31 out of 40 people found this review helpful.

Common Sense

Anyone who has decent organization skills should not buy this book. The whole book reiterates itself over and over and over and over and.... you get the picture. Let me summarize the book. Have a file cabinet and use it. Have a basket and put everything you have to do i...
Anyone who has decent organization skills should not buy this book. The whole book reiterates itself over and over and over and over and.... you get the picture. Let me summarize the book. Have a file cabinet and use it. Have a basket and put everything you have to do in it. Get everything off your mind by writing it down. Finally, go to your office supply store and load up on office supplies and organization products. After the first 75 pages, it becomes very redundant.

posted by 788146 on January 6, 2009

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  • Posted September 26, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Great Book / Lousy Editing

    This is a great book. It came highly recommended by a friend who is an astronaut and has a very challenging work schedule.

    I've nearly finished reading it - for the first time, and I think I'll read it again and take better notes. But the editing in the ebook version is HORRIBLE. The editor may not realize you need spaces between ALL the words, not just some of them. There are sentences where you have to delete or add a word for it to make sense. I'm sure this isn't how the book was written, but the publisher needs to issue us an update.

    I'd give it five stars for content, but 1 star for editing - so I'm splitting the difference and calling it a three.

    18 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2007

    Great Concept---Poor Presentation and Delivery

    The book¿s title is a winner. Allen¿s premise is excellent: ¿Our productivity is directly proportional to our ability to relax. Only when our minds are clear and our thoughts organized can we achieve effective results and unleash our creative potential.¿ Allen has spent more than 20 years as a business trainer and coach in the field of productivity. He likens the brain to the random access memory (RAM) of the computer. The more tasks it works on simultaneously, the slower and less productive it becomes. In the book, he describes the productivity system that he has developed to remove brain clutter. His system does not put much emphasis on prioritizing. Nor does it give much weight to a lack of time being a restraining factor. Instead, he focuses on the issues of ¿lack of clarity and definition.¿ Allen concentrates on mastering the flow of work so that your brain will not become cluttered with non-essential subjects. By doing so, he wants his readers to escape lower level thinking and concentrate on a higher level of thinking. Allen states that ¿physical organization must be better than mental organization for that to happen.¿ One caveat of that line of thinking is to have multiple lists or folders or online software whereby you can list categories of tasks ¿according to locations and functions.¿ The thrust of his presentation is found in Chapter 8, ¿Processing: Getting ¿In¿ to Empty.¿ His method involves putting all tasks in an ¿In¿ basket, and then examining each one individually. If the task can be accomplished within two minutes, it is to be done immediately. If not, it should flow into one of three categories which are self-explanatory: 1) Trash 2) Incubate 3)Reference. Allen¿s definition of a project, the ultimate productivity goal, is rather novel---an ¿outcome requiring more than one step.¿ Also, his use of the calendar for an entry is rather interesting. His viewpoint of a calendar entry is that it should be done that day or not all. It is not to be moved under any circumstances. The book is liberally sprinkled with quotations on productivity to leaven his rather boring, flat, and meandering presentations in each chapter. The book concentrates on paper flow, and does not address practical issues, such as handling phone calls, appointments, work overload, distractions, and other productivity issues.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 3, 2011

    What good is an index...

    With no page numbers AND no interactivity?

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 2, 2011

    Thanks for the comments

    I will keep my paperback until the ebook is interactive

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2013

    elizabeth.mclure@dhs.gov

    stress free produtivity was a good book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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