Customer Reviews for

Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

Average Rating 3.5
( 79 )
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(23)

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(8)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

"Getting To Yes" is a winner!

I attended a mediation course that follows the philosophy communicated in "Getting To Yes". If you read this book and follow the advice, you will never look at an issue the same again. You will consider the interests of all parties prior to responding to any question. A...
I attended a mediation course that follows the philosophy communicated in "Getting To Yes". If you read this book and follow the advice, you will never look at an issue the same again. You will consider the interests of all parties prior to responding to any question. As a mediator, the tools are critical to a "win-win" outcome. I consider this book and their follow-up book, "Beyond Reason", as books to keep within arms reach at all times.

posted by CognitiveWealth on August 15, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

Over rated

I was recommended this book by a management consultant. Having read it I understand why, like most consultants it has little new to say, plenty of buzz words but no real execution guidelines. The book is not all bad, I liked the explanation for the win-win attitude. Ove...
I was recommended this book by a management consultant. Having read it I understand why, like most consultants it has little new to say, plenty of buzz words but no real execution guidelines. The book is not all bad, I liked the explanation for the win-win attitude. Over all the book does explain the attitude you should have to renegotiate successfully, but unlike some great managerial books, lack the real world examples and guild lines on how to get the job done.

posted by Anonymous on March 2, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2008

    Over rated

    I was recommended this book by a management consultant. Having read it I understand why, like most consultants it has little new to say, plenty of buzz words but no real execution guidelines. The book is not all bad, I liked the explanation for the win-win attitude. Over all the book does explain the attitude you should have to renegotiate successfully, but unlike some great managerial books, lack the real world examples and guild lines on how to get the job done.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 15, 2009

    "Getting To Yes" is a winner!

    I attended a mediation course that follows the philosophy communicated in "Getting To Yes". If you read this book and follow the advice, you will never look at an issue the same again. You will consider the interests of all parties prior to responding to any question. As a mediator, the tools are critical to a "win-win" outcome. I consider this book and their follow-up book, "Beyond Reason", as books to keep within arms reach at all times.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A book I would recommend to my associates, Getting to Yes.

    Getting to Yes is a book that it is simple to read yet it is full of recommendations on how to negotiate and get to yes - thus getting what you want. Although the concepts outlined on this book should be known by everyone, it is not until you read it that it dings on you on the steps you need to take to prepare for any negotiation. When you get to the middle of the book, you already know all the concepts, and the rest of the book is more of a mantra of what was said initially. This is a book that can be read during the weekend. The challenge is practicing the concepts on real life situations.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

    Excellent Resource for understanding applying Negotiation Techniques

    I have used this book as a resource guide numerous times over the years. I have found it to be quite practical, detailed and explains the Negotiation Process in a very concise way. Highly recommended for anyone in the negotiation process or facing one in the near future.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 26, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Book Needed by Every Manager in Business

    As a corporate human resources director, I often find myself in the position of negotiator. This may be with unions, contractors, vendors or employees. After reading this book, I found that many of the `tips' actually work in the real world. <BR/><BR/>Combined with the book by Jerry Spence How to Argue & Win Every Time: At Home, At Work, In Court, Everywhere, Everyday this book will have a very positive impact on your negotiating skills. Michael L Gooch, SPHR

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2006

    Best Negotiation Book Around

    This is the best book on negotiation you will find. It is clear, and the insights are easy to put to use. Take the idea of looking underneath positions to interests. It is a simple idea. And it is the essence of whether a negotiation will turn sour or successful. My one big complaint is that this book doesn't go into too much depth on dealing with the people problem. (Separating the peopel from the problem is not helpful enough for me.) But Fisher just came out with a new book that goes to the heart of emotions and is a perfect sequel. (His new book is Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate.)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2004

    Packed with Knowledge!

    Authors Roger Fisher, William L. Ury and Bruce M. Patton offer a seminal step-by-step guide to negotiating effectively. The authors use anecdotal examples to illustrate both positive and negative negotiating techniques. They believe that, with principled negotiation, both parties can reach an agreement in an amicable and efficient manner. Principled negotiation is based on the belief that when each side comes to understand the interests of the other, they can jointly create options that are mutually advantageous, resulting in a wise settlement. Since this is the second edition, the authors take the opportunity to answer ten common questions from readers of the first edition. If you become skeptical about these fairly rosy negotiation techniques as you read, the Q and A section is very useful. This classic text is easy to understand and you can implement its techniques immediately. We can¿t ask for more than that.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2001

    Detailed, Insightful, Valuable

    This book is valuable for negotiators representing themselves or other parties in complex disputes. It is also valuable for dealing with non-business related disputes. Getting To Yes offers valuable insight into the psychology of disputes and dispute resolution. It empowers you in ordinary situations such as buying a car or settling a personal insurance claim. I read it again and again before I serve as a negotiator and also before I act as a third-party mediator.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2014

    Songs so far

    A thousand years- christine perry <br>
    Exterminate regenerate- chamealan circuit.

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  • Posted April 9, 2013

    Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In by Roger

    Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In by Roger Fisher and William Ury recognizes that professionals are in a frequent state of negotiation and provides them with the tools needed to achieve a desirable outcome. This book probes many diverse negotiation circumstances from both sides of the debate and offers constructive, easy-to-follow methods to achieve one's desired outcomes by:

    - Disentangling the people from the problem
    - Focusing on interests, not positions
    - Working together to find creative and fair options
    - These methods help the reader negotiate with anyone at any level of their organization.

    I believe that negotiation is a key component to individual and organizational success. Getting to Yes breaks down these give and take situations; providing the immediately actionable tools needed to achieve a favorable outcome and making these situations less intimidating. If I had one criticism of the book, it would be that the authors seek to achieve a `fair' or `equitable' outcome for each side. While this appears admirable, it forfeits an upside gain that an effective negotiation might be able to otherwise achieve.

    Getting to Yes provides a thorough, actionable negotiation tool set that is critical to every professional and organization's success; making it a StrategyDriven recommended read.

    All the Best,
    Nathan Ives
    StrategyDriven Principal

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2013

    Brian

    Here?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    I borrowed this book from the library and decided it's a must have in the home library. It's great for people in consulting and business.

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  • Posted June 23, 2012

    I read this book in my doctoral mediation class. It was very in

    I read this book in my doctoral mediation class. It was very interesting and beneficial for everyday life as well as negotations.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2011

    All good.

    All good.

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  • Posted May 5, 2010

    User Friendly and Convenient Shopping

    I order for my company, in bulk. What do all of us look for in an online ordering process? User Friendly and Convenient Shopping! Well, that is what I have found with the online ordering on the Barnes and Noble website. The continuous email updates regarding ordering, processing, and shipping allow me to not have to spend my time tracking my orders - what more could you ask for? Thank you Barnes and Noble for making it a seamless process to online shop with you!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2004

    College textbook

    I used this book for a negotiation class in college. The main emphasis is on creating value where none exists. In short, too many negotiations try to divide the pie. THis book explains how to make the pie bigger.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2004

    Rambling, impersonal, and outdated.

    Getting to Yes lacked any memorable, breakthrough concepts. It was co-authored by three negotiating experts, who in this case, were unable to negotiate a coherent work. The book rambled. It was also obviously outdated. After reading one example too many of 1970's negotiation efforts between Israel and Egypt, or the United States and the Soviet Union, I gave up and stopped reading. This book gets donated tomorrow to the local public library.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2002

    Good but dated, newer stuff available

    This is the classic book that started the whole field. But the original was written in the 1970's and even the second edition is well behind the state of the art. It's a good book if you haven't done much negotiating and want to get a quick sense of some basic ideas. But if you have negotiated or find you need deeper insight, you should quickly move on to more recent books such as Breakthrough Business Negotiation or Bargaining for Advantage or The Heart and Mind of the Negotiator.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2002

    The Standard

    This is tha standard that negotiations is measured by. It is a must read for anyone looking to sharpen skills.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2001

    Win-Win Is The Only Winning Sttategy

    This book is an all time life guide. I attended a seminar where this book was used as the focus in 1992 in Europe. Today, I would like to share this with people in South Asia. Any one of any organisations provding seminars built around Roger Fisher's Harvard Concept?

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