Customer Reviews for

Ghost: A Novel

Average Rating 3
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 14 of 11 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted January 27, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Weak

    The storyline sounds intriguing. However, the writing is weak. Nothing is resolved. I was disappointed in the book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2007

    Boring

    I was really looking forward to reading this book, and it started out well....then it went on and on and on....the last 50 pages I just skimmed thru, and then read the last chapter. Glad I rented it from the library, and didn't buy it. Not a keeper!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2008

    Pretentious

    Perhaps because Lightman is a professor, he seems to put a lot of emphasis characters who are 'well educated.' For example Jenny, Martin's wife, should be deferred to because she has a degree in management. Where does this frame of mind come from? I have a news flash for Lightman, a college degree, or a Master's, is not unusual. The world is full of such 'well educated' people. Perhaps this is why Lightman refers to David's mother as not being 'cultured,' even though she has a love of poetry. Perhaps if she had a degree in management . . . David, the novel's main character, is predictably agnostic. Of course since he has a college degree, in Lightman's mind, David is beyond such uncultured beliefs. Then there is David's girlfriend. Again predictably, she works in a library. She does, however, tell David she has never learned anything out of a book. Since she is 'educated,' perhaps she has moved beyond that state of mind. I am not sure if she is cultured, though she must be since David is falling in love with her. All-in-all, Lightman's novel is predictable, pretentious, and populated with shallow neurotic characters 'none of whom are appealing'.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2007

    Waiting and waiting, but no excitement!

    The book had a few intriguing chapters in the beginning which explained what life is like working at a funeral home as well as the 'processes' used there. However, chapter after chapter I was holding my breath waiting for something exciting, or at least an explanation of 'the ghost' but never got anything. There was way too much rhetoric and philosphical thought. Half way through, I lost interested. Luckily I rented if from the library too! If you're expecting an exciting thriller or mytsery, look elsewhere.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    . Alan Lightman forces his audience to internalize and ponder the sources of their beliefs.

    David was a rising star at the bank where he worked receiving employee awards and verbal kudos until the day came when he was fired for the bank was reorganizing and he was redundant. It took him three months to find another job and that was as a mortuary assistant at a funeral home. One day while in the slumber room alone he sees a ghost and is totally freaked out.----------------- The metaphysical was a myth to David¿s mathematical mind and as much as he tried to rationalize he knows he saw something that belongs to the supernatural realm. As word leaks as of what he saw, people beg him to get in touch with their loved ones the Society for the Second World wants to use him as a spokesman to prove that there is a world beyond our own and a group of college professors want him to say he saw nothing, repudiating what he believes. As David comes to terms with himself, he allows himself to believe in what he saw but wants to be left alone by those who want to use him--------------------- The protagonist sees something that shouldn¿t exist and he doesn¿t know how to deal with it. Various groups with their own agendas try to push him into believing their way but David proves to himself he is strong enough to listen, evaluate and not be influenced by anyone but himself. Through his ordeal, he also comes to terms with a past he idealized but wasn¿t what he thought it was. He realizes his mother was always a distant figure and his ex-wife lived in a state of unhappiness. Alan Lightman forces his audience to internalize and ponder the sources of their beliefs.------------------ Harriet Klausner

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 14 of 11 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1