Customer Reviews for

Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road

Average Rating 4
( 63 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(36)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

beware

If you're fan of Peart because of his drumming (such as I), and are looking for something related to drumming, you're not going to find it here. If you're a motorcyclist looking for stories about a motorcycling adventure, you're not going to find it here, either. This b...
If you're fan of Peart because of his drumming (such as I), and are looking for something related to drumming, you're not going to find it here. If you're a motorcyclist looking for stories about a motorcycling adventure, you're not going to find it here, either. This book was written from the perspective of a man that lost his whole world and was attempting to find himself and his way, by escaping into the 'unknown', and traveling 55, 000 miles using his 'vice', a motorcycle. He wasn't on the road simply touring north american highways and hotels. He was on a journey of self discovery, hoping to find something left inside of himself, to let him know he really did have continued purpose, and to carry on. Along the way, he let us in on many private letters, thoughts, and emotions. Also along the way, he included very nice imagery and descriptions of the landscapes he was traversing. I enjoyed the book very much and found it to be very revealing of Peart in a most personal way. I've been a fan of his, and Rush for some 25 years, so I was acutely aware of his passion for reading and writing. As much as I've respected him as a musician and player, I have even more respect for him as a human, dealing with tragedy. I would recommend this book to someone looking for a deeper insight into who Neil Peart is, aside from the person we, as music fans, think he is. Hope you enjoy.

posted by Anonymous on November 13, 2006

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Disappointing

This book was nothing but disappointing. After reading Mr. Peart's previous book, 'The Masked Rider,' I had high hopes for this one, only to have them dashed by over 400 pages of what I can only call 'not much.' What makes the book even more disappointing is to see th...
This book was nothing but disappointing. After reading Mr. Peart's previous book, 'The Masked Rider,' I had high hopes for this one, only to have them dashed by over 400 pages of what I can only call 'not much.' What makes the book even more disappointing is to see the clearly talented author's writing gone to waste on this material. There's very little story here or plot in a traditional sense in this book. Instead, what the reader gets is a slice of the inner workings of Mr. Peart's mind from a period covering a little more than a year during which the author attempts to recover from the deaths of both his wife and only child by removing himself from town and driving around North America on his motorcycle. Readers will undoubtedly understand just what he saw on his travels and just how he felt. This is what the reader gets, plain and simple. It is an unfiltered, raw, painful, intimate and very honest account. This is no lightweight material. The author has terrific talent for putting words together and conveying just exactly what was on his mind at the time. The book's brazenly and almost proudly unapologetic style is unmistakable; the author really doesn't care what the reader thinks. Most of these things are promising ingredients for this or any book. But after a while, one is reminded of a teenager far too full of his own bluster and self-purpose not to share it with the rest of the world, yet too immature to understand that the rest of the world has its own share of problems and that life does not and should not revolve around himself. When reading the book, one eventually feels like saying 'enough about you already, what about something for me!' And that's the main problem here and the key ingredient that's missing: the author has nothing to say that's of real interest to anybody. There's nothing for a general audience. They can't learn anything or grow from anything in this book because it doesn't seem as though it's written for the actual people who will be reading it. It seems to be a gift to a husband or a wife only; an intimate sharing of oneself that is satisfying and full as an offering to someone close, yet empty and meaningless as an offering to strangers, presumably the vast majority of the readers. It's as if only a mother or a lover could enjoy this book. To sum it all up, one can only wait eagerly for the next book and hope that it will be much better.

posted by Anonymous on September 23, 2002

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 63 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 4
  • Posted April 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A good book by a great drummer and an even better writer

    Neal Peart is the drummer for the legendary band Rush. In the span of one year he lost his daughter in a car accident and his wife to cancer. In this book "Ghost Rider" Mr. Peart spells out a story thats sure to touch your heart and lift your spirit. After a 45,000 mile motorcycle trip around Canada, The United States and Mexico, Mr Peart tells us what it took for him to cope in those difficult times.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2005

    this book rocks!!!

    i've been a fan of rush since 1978 i've seen rush a least 21 times,when i read this book i was amazed of how this man was able to get thru with this and have the courage to write about it. god bless you mr.peart rock on

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2003

    Healing Ghost Ride

    I enjoyed this book very much. Found myself looking forward to my next moments with this book. Many parallels to my life being a musician who had so many losses in one year,it made my head(body,soul) spin. Could relate on many levels. As Neal stated, you can't listen to your (or other's) music and it feels like a whole other previous life or person that existed. Glad to see Neal makes it back to creating music. If you are hurting, this book helps to validate your emotions and is a fun ride with descriptive scenic and emotional travels beside the Ghost Rider!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2003

    This book is a healer

    Neils account of the double tradgedy and his way of dealing with it was very insipring. I could of not handled it. His book was instrumental in my own healing after the senseless murder of my sons schoolmate, Danielle van Dam. Neil helped me put in perspective the feelings I was experiencing. The futility in trying to understand. But yet showed how hope can still exist when all seems hopeless. A good read that took me along his journey of healing, all the while not knowing if he ever 'heal'. Thanks, Neil

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2003

    As wondrous and heartwrenching as I anticipated

    <p>I knew of Neil's personal tragedies long before having read this book, but I still desired to see what lay in his mind during the healing process. I was fortunate to purchase both books at the May, 2002 Rush show at Riverbend Music Center (Cincinnati), but I was already in the midst of another large book series at the time, so I didn't read either of Neil's 'til January, 2003. I first read <i>Masked Rider</i> as more of a prelude, and found it enjoyable - I felt I was on the bike with the troupe through their trials in the African heat. Thus, I was incredibly excited to begin <i>Ghost Rider.</i></p> <p>As I began <i>Ghost Rider</i>, I again became immersed in Neil's world, reliving the horrible day when the police officer came to the door to deliver the news about Selena. I felt both Jackie's subsequent hopelessness and Neil's helplessness, and I gained more appreciation for the lyrics to the song 'Ghost Rider' as he told of Jackie's passing. I can sympathize with his need to just get away, and applaud his desire to 'keep moving' to avoid falling into a pit of despair, drink, and drugs. I could see how confused he was and I identify with that need for space, for the walls and memories in that house would have otherwise closed in on him. I think I would have had to get out as well, and as someone who is something of a loner, I would have been 'shouldering that invisible load' myself, thinking no one could help me through it but myself.</p> <p>I used to live out west, so I selfishly took in the landscapes as he described them and wished I could be there, though not with the same motivation. I am glad, though, to see he brought some educational materials with him (the book on birds) in order to continue his self-education - I know others who foolishly ridicule him for being a high-school dropout, but his writing makes it clear that the lack of a diploma has been no hindrance to him. I think such self-reliance helped through his travails, and I'm not sure I know anyone who would have the fortitude to travel 55,000 miles to find healing. Most might just wallow in self-pity instead.</p> <p>This is a wonderfully written book. I can see how the short-sighted might find his numerous letters a bit cumbersome, but these were the letters he sent to many people, and he wanted to credit each and every one of them for being there for him, even though they may have only been there to 'listen.' Of course many of them would contain the same information, but they were all different in subtle ways. He wrote the letters and this book as if he had nothing to hide, for the best way to heal was to be fully open with his feelings.</p> <p>As a fan of Rush, I am naturally glad he found someone and was able to resume his drumming. Now, however, I realize how close we all came to not having that anymore, and their music has more value to me, and not just because of my own selfish desires for more quality music in a time devoid of it. It's because of the inner strengths of the men involved in the band Rush, especially the drumming 'ghost' who seems to be once again whole. And as when I listen to a Rush album, I was saddened to finish <i>Ghost Rider</i>, and I cannot wait to enjoy it again.</p>

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2003

    A great book about what life is

    I am not a book reader at all. I am a huge fan of Rush though. I felt that I would be able to learn more about this man that has been my idol along with the other members of RUSH for over 20 yrs. Unfortunately it took a book about sadness....but it told me a lot not only about him...but what is really important in life....to be happy. Bravo to Neil and I highly recommend the book to anyone...not just fans.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2003

    The road less traveled...made all the difference.

    The novel written by Mr. Peart is one many authors do not have the guts to write. Writing about personal tragedy, how he got though it, and releasing it to the world (which can be harsh at times) is a very bold move. Even for a man like himself who has been known to be aloof. Having lost a loved one to cancer and also losing my only child, I can relate to how he felt. Granted it would have been nice to see certain characters fleshed out better, such as 'that woman,' as well as to find out why he decided to change the tone of the book from his first person account of events (which really started the book off right) to the postpartum recollections in his letters to Brutus (he could have used this for awhile, and then segued back to the first person account - just my opinion). However, I kept in mind this is a work coming from someone in a very fragile state of mind. After taking that into consideration, and relating to my own experience, I am glad to have picked up this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2003

    Not a lark of a trip, but it wasn't meant to be

    I've read some reviews that say Peart obviously hates Americans, or hates his fans in general. I don't think, from reading this account of his long journey, that this is a fair assessment. True, he often refers to Americans as "fat", but then, let's be honest and take a look around. There's a weight problem in this country. Truth hurts. This is a tale of a man whose emotions were left extremely raw, his tolerance for things flippant or annoying cut to the quick. What the book does show is how much Peart came to appreciate the people he encountered along the way. In one passage, and I'm paraphrasing, he says he had always felt that "Life is great, but people suck," but had changed his mind to "Life sucks, but people are great." The book shows how he progressed from the first cold morning, setting off on the motorcycle, to gradually getting back into life and finally getting remarried and going back to work. If you like Rush at all, it also gives a new perspective on his lyrics -- likely not what he intended, but at least it did that for me. For anyone who's gone through a trauma that left them wondering, "Well, what next? How, or why, do I go on from here?" this book is highly recommended. Peart doesn't sugar-coat things. If you're looking for a light-hearted story of a fun trip to Tuscany, look elsewhere. Accept his flaws and consider what he was going through at the time, and it goes down a lot easier.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2003

    Beyond Simple Description

    Being a Rush fan for over 2 decades, I figured 'this should be interesting'. I was correct, in more ways than one. From deeply personal anecdotes (rare for Mr. Peart's usually guarded demeanor) to simple travel logs and introspection, a truly emotional work, makes for interesting, but not casual reading. One feels his pain, loss, joys, and eventual victory over his life challenges. There are a lot of esoteric literary references in the transcribed correspondences with his friends, but a lot of funny stories and good natured ribbing between them as well, showing a sense of humor below the writer's usual 'serious' songwriting. Overall, a great book, but definitely not for fans of fluff pieces about rock stars. Definitely deserves wider distribution and promotion, but alas will most likely be treasured by Rush fans only, and the literary world will be the poorer for it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2003

    You might not get it.

    I won't bore you with yet another description of the book; read the synopsis above for that. Many reviews for this book call it "shallow" - and you will, if you come into it with the wrong mindset. Don't read this book to learn about Neil Peart, musician. Read this book for the journey of a man, stricken with grief, learning to understand his world "in the after." Read it for an excellent travelogue and learn a great deal about the out-of-the-way places that are there only if you have the courage and the will to find them. If you have never experienced grief, loss, depression, or sorrow, you will not understand this book; it is not for the blissful, nor the ignorant. There are differences between traveling and vacationing, sadness and despair, acquaintances and friends, living and merely existing. If you've never considered that, you won't "get it."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2003

    Great Book!

    Neil Peart is brutally honest,giving the good and bad experiences fair chance.He goes on a seemingless endless journey in search of inner peace.He apreciates all the beauties of nature,holds great affection for his friends,and tells of his annoyance of strangers.One must realize his annoyance with strangers is not due to a character flaw,but the state of mind that someone grieving might display.I love the fact that he is so truthful,like it or not!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2002

    awsome inspiration you give us hope

    this book is heart wrenching, sad and beautiful, but at same time joy and happyiness. The music world and drummers from all around the world are inspired by his talent for drums and lyrics to music. We as fans are happy that you have come full circle, and found a renewed spirit. Thanks for coming back to us all, keep playing. The book shows you are a changed man, but it shows in your playing and your new love for life has change for the better. This is a man a musician that has emerged from tragedy to an even greater human being. Good luck to you my friend though the journey of life.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2002

    Wow...should I cry for or celebrate this journey?

    Read it and you will understand why I give this 5 stars. The book is inspiring. Seldom do you you get such a deep look into the depths of another human. As a reader you are offered the relentless journey of the rollecoaster in reverse healing process coupled with the eloquently described scenic beauty of North America. I will read it again...but not right away as I must savor its potency. It can be a dark journey you see.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2002

    Outstanding!!!

    Congrat's to Neil Peart...A man who can inspire people (me) to take a look within to see how lucky we are everyday. Without question a book that inspires and makes you think all at once!Thank you Neil for making me understand how fortunate I have been in my life. I'm happy for your new found happiness!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2002

    Ghost Rider a must read for anyone whose lost a loved one.

    I had no idea what I was in for when I added Ghost Rider to my ever-growing book collection. I picked it up simply because Neil Peart wrote it. But, as I have learned over the last five days (a personal record for me), this is a healing book. It begins with a man and his wife rocked by the death of their nineteen year old daughter. Then, the man loses his wife to a broken heart (in the guise of cancer) less than a year later. What is left of the man is a ghost with nothing more substantial than grief. With nothing left to live for, the man rides off on his motorcycle and heads wherever the road takes him knowing that motion is the one obsticle keeping from the 'deep, dark hole'. While much of Ghost Rider reads like a guidebook to the North American landscape by motorbike, what you find in between the magnificently described landscapes and towns along the journey are genuine insights into the pain of devastating loss. For all of us who have lost people we love, this story reminds us that the process of healing is a long and perilous journey that never really ends, only changes.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2002

    The Professor of Writing - Neil Peart!

    Neil proves that one does not need a formal education to be a good writer and to be educated, because Neil did not graduate from High School. His story is inspirational and teaches us to look within for our own esteem and to keep improving in our lives. Great work Neil!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2002

    Inspirational and uplifting!

    As a Neil Peart fan, a Rush fan and a drummer, I could not wait for this book to come out. This book covers 55,000 miles of hurt, anger, saddness, rebuilding and learning to live again. I envy Neil for his travels across Noth America. Not for what he has lost, but for what he has learned and gained from his experiences. This is a must read for anyone who has suffered a loss or for anyone wanting to travel our great land. Hats off to Neil for his incredible bravery and for sharing part of his life with us.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2002

    A journey into the soul

    Whether you are a fan of Rush or a fan of the human spirit, this is a must read! Peart combines his gift of prose with his own journal entries and creates a narrative memoir that is impossible to put down, yet, at times, almost too painful to continue reading. I found myself re-reading entire pages because they were so powerful, so beautiful, and so triumphant. I will definately read this again someday, but I am still processing the images and feelings this book presented. Suddenly, you were gone...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 63 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 4