Customer Reviews for

Gluten-Free Girl: How I Found the Food That Loves Me Back...And How You Can Too

Average Rating 3
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(9)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

better than a cookbook

This is a memoir and a great cookbook! Enjoyed reading it as a memoir, and received a lot of good hints about cooking from the cookbook parts. Taught me more than I ever knew and I am 70 years old. You don't have to need gluten-free eating to benefit from this book.

posted by Anonymous on February 20, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

A Writer/Foodie Writes a Memoir...Oh, and She's a Celiac

I ordered this book thinking it was a cookbook. It's actually a celiac memoir. Not terrible reading to pass the time. Read it on the train, or plane, or the bathroom. Shauna's writing is organized, she is obviously well educated, and it shows that she cares about writin...
I ordered this book thinking it was a cookbook. It's actually a celiac memoir. Not terrible reading to pass the time. Read it on the train, or plane, or the bathroom. Shauna's writing is organized, she is obviously well educated, and it shows that she cares about writing and eating well. So it would seem that for her this book is her love letter about food, based on her experiences and offered up to the world, honestly noble in her intentions.

Unfortunately it is not simply a cookbook with an attached warning sticker: "Written for Foodies", and I'm sure Shuana would argue that's not the point--that the point is we see that food is accessible, and that we should all dine from the world's grand table, with all of it's finest offerings. She's *right*, perhaps we should. But she's delusional, too. Most people who face celiac disease are looking to eat so they don't get sick...not so they spend more $$ to eat "well", which is entirely subjective. Most of us aren't 150 yards from the fresh fish market like she is, and most of us are working families who see a movie out with the kids as a splurge....so um...'no'...we probably don't want to go out and buy pomegranite molasses.

On Shauna's list: "The Top Ten Noble Tastes" there is no reference to the "other grains" considered staples in most kitchens, and a lifeline for many celiacs. Really (and I mean really) expensive vinegars and oils, but no sustenance staples upon which the average celiac would rely, and would have rather seen listed here.

Don't get me wrong--Shauna is an excellent writer....but her book lacks any real substance, and she sends mixed messages....such as using highly negative descriptive words for the foods from her past----foods she admits to having loved and wolfed down with gusto----and highly seductive and beautiful imagery for the "new foods".....and then using those same positive descriptives for a hot dog (when she finally breaks down and starts eating meat again) at a NYC outdoor vendor....even though that kind of food would have fallen into the "bad food" category if it had been from her hometown. She arbitrarily decides for us what food falls into the praiseworthy category, and what foods do not belong, and when she's critical---boy is she ever critical! She purposefully overdramatizes to get her points across and in doing so makes her parents out to sound like unstable people who practically poisoned her, despite the fact that she went willingly. They are just as innocent as she was, in other words. It also seems cruel that she would use this forum to discuss a very personal private hell her mother endured surrounding agoraphobia. That's not what human beings should do do each other, much less family.

The tone of the book is summed up on page 53, wherein Shauna admits "....Two kids raised to believe that they should be different than most people (translation: smarter and more educated)..."

A bit of an alienating read...which is a total shame because if she had taken certain unnecessary personal bits (her ego clearly sat on top of her computer staring at her as she hacked this one out) out of it the book would have been superb.

posted by 887497 on January 24, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2008

    better than a cookbook

    This is a memoir and a great cookbook! Enjoyed reading it as a memoir, and received a lot of good hints about cooking from the cookbook parts. Taught me more than I ever knew and I am 70 years old. You don't have to need gluten-free eating to benefit from this book.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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