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God and Stephen Hawking: Whose Design Is It Anyway?

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Interesting read

John Lennox sets out to examine the arguments of Steven Hawking, in his book "The Grand Design", and present his own arguments in non-technical terms. For the most part Lennox is successful, though it is impossible to make all of the arguments in strictly "layman's" te...
John Lennox sets out to examine the arguments of Steven Hawking, in his book "The Grand Design", and present his own arguments in non-technical terms. For the most part Lennox is successful, though it is impossible to make all of the arguments in strictly "layman's" terms when you are discussing string theory, quantum physics and deep philosophical ideas. Nevertheless, anyone with a basic understanding of physics and the laws of nature should be able to follow and understand the logic presented.

Lennox begins by immediately questioning the validity of Hawking's main conclusion by pointing out contradictions within the statement of the conclusion itself. He continues throughout to peel back the fanciful scientific sounding arguments to reveal that many of them are in fact not scientific, but products of Hawking's own personal beliefs. He also attempts throughout to provide simple everyday examples to show why some of Hawking's conclusions are unproven or even improvable themselves (one of the problems Hawking's has with believing in an intelligent creator.)

One thing Lennox avoids is criticism of Hawking's intellect; in fact he repeatedly acknowledges the great mind that Hawking is. But he clearly makes the case for why Hawking's conclusions are not scientific or definitive, while the evidence for an intelligent designer is supported by science, history, philosophy, archaeology and human experience. Lennox is unashamed to admit his own personal belief in Jesus Christ, but he admits that Judaism and Islam also share the basic belief in an omnipotent, omnipresent, omniscient creator.

Whether you believe in a creator or not, one must admit that Lennox' arguments cast doubt on the conclusions reached by Hawking. Not only can we question the conclusions, but the reasoning behind them are shown to be yet improvable, casting into question the idea that they are conclusions at all. And thus this book is recommendable if than for no reason other than it reminds us that we must always question the theories and conclusions of scientists (no matter their caliber and prestige) until they can be proven, and repeatedly so.

posted by JamieLittle on July 14, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

God and Stephen Hawking

God and Steven Hawking- Whose Design Is It Anyway? by John C. Lennox, is 96 page apologetic work in response to Steven Hawking's well known bestselling work, "The Grand Design". Lennox concedes that Hawking has made accessible to the laymen, his God-less theories of ph...
God and Steven Hawking- Whose Design Is It Anyway? by John C. Lennox, is 96 page apologetic work in response to Steven Hawking's well known bestselling work, "The Grand Design". Lennox concedes that Hawking has made accessible to the laymen, his God-less theories of physics, and science to the main-stream, challenging belief in God and the bible. The implications of this atheistic view of God in society are seriously damaging to faith in God. Because of this danger, Lennox feels the need to point out the holes and weakness in Hawking's theories as presented in the "The Grand Design". Specifically, he is not debating about the scientific ideas presented by Hawking but about the conclusions that he comes up with- namely that God does not exist. He feels that Hawking is in error, when he dismisses the validity of philosophy and faith in addressing crucial questions such as the purpose and meaning of life. Lennox challenges the claim that the law of gravity is the explanation for the creation and purpose of the universe and this is not a satisfactory explanation of the laws of nature and morals. In essense, Hawking creates for himself, his own god- which is the universe, or more accurately, the multiverse. Hawking's work, simply is unable to answer the questions as to the purpose or why the world was created.

I believe that Lennox's ideas as presented in his book would be more accessible to the laymen in a pamphlet or tract form rather than a 96 page book. The intended market audience of this book is obviously those who have in fact read or are actually familiar with and understand Hawking's works- which I assume is not too many. The way Lennox's book is presented, is not neccessarily the most readable- therefore I believe a smaller booklet form or tract version with graphics and bullet points would be more effective. This book seems more like a research paper and is not very readable to the average reader.

As a blogger for Litfuse, I recieved this book from Lion Book publishers for the purpose of writing this review. The opinions expressed are my own.

posted by PJtheEMT4 on June 16, 2011

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  • Posted June 16, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    God and Stephen Hawking

    God and Steven Hawking- Whose Design Is It Anyway? by John C. Lennox, is 96 page apologetic work in response to Steven Hawking's well known bestselling work, "The Grand Design". Lennox concedes that Hawking has made accessible to the laymen, his God-less theories of physics, and science to the main-stream, challenging belief in God and the bible. The implications of this atheistic view of God in society are seriously damaging to faith in God. Because of this danger, Lennox feels the need to point out the holes and weakness in Hawking's theories as presented in the "The Grand Design". Specifically, he is not debating about the scientific ideas presented by Hawking but about the conclusions that he comes up with- namely that God does not exist. He feels that Hawking is in error, when he dismisses the validity of philosophy and faith in addressing crucial questions such as the purpose and meaning of life. Lennox challenges the claim that the law of gravity is the explanation for the creation and purpose of the universe and this is not a satisfactory explanation of the laws of nature and morals. In essense, Hawking creates for himself, his own god- which is the universe, or more accurately, the multiverse. Hawking's work, simply is unable to answer the questions as to the purpose or why the world was created.

    I believe that Lennox's ideas as presented in his book would be more accessible to the laymen in a pamphlet or tract form rather than a 96 page book. The intended market audience of this book is obviously those who have in fact read or are actually familiar with and understand Hawking's works- which I assume is not too many. The way Lennox's book is presented, is not neccessarily the most readable- therefore I believe a smaller booklet form or tract version with graphics and bullet points would be more effective. This book seems more like a research paper and is not very readable to the average reader.

    As a blogger for Litfuse, I recieved this book from Lion Book publishers for the purpose of writing this review. The opinions expressed are my own.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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