Customer Reviews for

God in Ruins

Average Rating 3
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

highly recommended for history and Marine lovers.

great early history of the Corp.

posted by 15937481 on October 12, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

A look at the US political system

I do not think this is one of Leon Uris' best books. I found it dragged in the middle and Uris could have reduced the four hundred pages considerably without detracting anything from the story. It is the life story of a presidential candidate in the 2008 election. Hi...
I do not think this is one of Leon Uris' best books. I found it dragged in the middle and Uris could have reduced the four hundred pages considerably without detracting anything from the story. It is the life story of a presidential candidate in the 2008 election. His opposite number is already in the White House trying for a second term. We have a more concise version of his life. Quinn Patrick O'Connell, the candidate, is a man with high principles who makes enemies among supporters of the gun lobby and the racist segments of American society. O'Connell, is leading on points when the book opens but he has discovered a secret which could cause him to lose the race.

posted by Anonymous on December 5, 2000

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2005

    Horrible

    This book was horrible. Battlecry is my favorite book. Mila 18, Exodus and Topaz were all great reads. But this was just terrible. I honestly don't think Leon Uris really wrote this book. The writing style and politics of this book are just too far off. As for the writing style, it was just incoherent. Incomplete sentences, goofy dialogue and jumping all over the last 60 years had me thoroughly confused from the beginning. And the politics, one of the main themes in the book was the 2nd amendment. As someone who's written awesome books about the armed struggle in Warsaw Ghetto, the armed struggle to create the state of Israel and the armed struggle in Ireland, I just don't understand how all of the sudden Mr. Uris has decided that guns are evil. And that all gun owners and NRA (AMERIGUN in the book) members are anti-Semitic, ignorant, racist, southern Christians. As a gun owner, NRA member, southerner and a Christian and couldn't help but feel a little offended. And as far as the anti-Semitic rioting, anybody remember Joe Lieberman? Almost elected vice-president, but that fact that he's Jewish was never really an issue. Is this really what Uris thinks about the American people? That we're capable of the things that happen in this book? During the peak of the armed militia stuff in the mid 90s no Eagle Scout massacres happened. Lieberman almost getting elected as the number 2 man on the government depth chart, no widespread riots. All in all, I wish I had never picked it up. All it did was annoy me and tarnish the way I think about one of my 2 favorite authors. Wanna read a Leon Uris book, get Battlecry. I've read it 4 times and it keeps getting better. A God in Ruins is heading for the trash can.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2000

    Leon Uris Sells Out

    It's a shame when a gifted writer like Leon Uris writes a book that sounds like media spin. In his references to current president Bill Clinton, main character O¿Connell sounds more like the head of the Democratic National Committee than a down-to-earth, honest, yet reluctant politician. Is it fantasy, irony, hypocrisy or some combination of all three that hero O¿Connell is so honest when many of our real life politicians are anything but? The good in the book are too good and the bad are too bad to be believable. While gun rights activists are painted as Nazi loving card carrying KKK members, the gun law supporters are portrayed as reasonable, caring and human. Although the story is sometimes fragmented, is still interesting enough to get through. This book is daring in that it attempts to offer commentary on the political and social climate in the United States today, but is definitely not one of Uris¿ best.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2000

    A look at the US political system

    I do not think this is one of Leon Uris' best books. I found it dragged in the middle and Uris could have reduced the four hundred pages considerably without detracting anything from the story. It is the life story of a presidential candidate in the 2008 election. His opposite number is already in the White House trying for a second term. We have a more concise version of his life. Quinn Patrick O'Connell, the candidate, is a man with high principles who makes enemies among supporters of the gun lobby and the racist segments of American society. O'Connell, is leading on points when the book opens but he has discovered a secret which could cause him to lose the race.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2012

    highly recommended for history and Marine lovers.

    great early history of the Corp.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2001

    Tears for a Muse in ruins

    I wept when I finished Leon Uris' Battlecry, I wept upon finishing Mila 18, Exodus, Armageddon and Trinity. He is the one author I buy in hardback copies to keep and reread. He has been the model I try to style myself after in my own writing. So it is not surprising that I wept after reading A God in Ruins. But this time, I wept because it was such a poor read. I have to wonder if he actually wrote it. Uris' characters are usually well developed and get into your heart, your soul. Quinn was so unbelievably good and 3T was so unbelieveably bad. The attempt to suggest an American Kristallnacht was as poor a conclusion to the book as one can expect in a John Grisham novel. His references to Pres. Clinton seem to echo excerpts from the Geraldo Rivera nightly apology network. I hope the next book puts Uris back on track. I do so love his characters and his unique way of weaving a story through their lives.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 28, 2011

    Good Read

    What is the mark of a man? A little love, some history, insight,, imperfection, knowledge and more. Uris is just good at revealing mankinds' essential being in a masterful use of words.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2004

    An uncanny 'deja vu' feel

    In autumn of 2008, Quinn Patrick O'Connell prepares to take office as president of the United States of America. Just before the election, this Democratic Governor of Colorado has satisfied a lifetime longing (and simultaneously risked everything) by discovering his true heritage. From that opening on, the story is told in flashback as Irish cop Dan O'Connell returns to Brooklyn after his World War II Marine Corps service. Dan and his bride, Siobhan, set out soon afterward to look for wider horizons where they can raise their family. They find those horizons in Colorado; but the family doesn't come along until Siobhan's brother, a Roman Catholic priest, arranges for them to adopt a three-year-old boy whose background they can never know. We also follow the rise to economic and political power of Thornton Tomtree, an emotionally stunted genius whose 'Bulldog' computer network eventually drives the nation. Novelist Uris offers his readers both an engrossing family saga, and a moral commentary on the United States at the dawn of the 21st Century. Written prior to 9/11, this book has an uncanny 'deja vu' feel in some of the fictional events it depicts. 'Who am I?' - Quinn Patrick O'Connell's great question, that appears to be answered before we're past the first chapter - turns out to be the one his nation must also ask itself.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2002

    An informative book

    Until the last 100 pages of this book, this isn't such a fun read, it isn't a can't-put-down book, however, it is a very informative book and you can learn a lot about American Politics from it. A good book to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2002

    Be ready to concentrate!

    I'm not surprised at the overall medicore reveiws on this book. I picked it up the first time and was so confused by the jumping around that I put it down before I'd even read 100 pages. One month later I picked it up to give it a second chance, and I couldn't put it down! If you're in the mood for an epic story, covering a number of decades,with multiple characters and storylines, it's a great read. But be prepared to concentrate and be patient!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2000

    Worth your time

    This is a thought provoking and emotionally satisfying novel. It is a bit scattered, but all in all, an excellent read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2000

    Good Election Yarn

    All in all not a bad book. It will not rank as one of his best but it is worth reading. Mr Uris does a great job in developing his characters with all of their strengths and weaknesses. The book tells the story of Quinn Patrick O¿Connell an orphan raised by transplanted New Yorkers on a Colorado ranch. Quinn is on the verge of being elected president when the true story of his birth surfaces. In the end though he overplays the conclusion. The riot scenes are totally unrealistic and would never have occurred. The revelation of Quinn¿s birth would have been a dramatic break in a tight race for the presidency but there would have been no mayhem as a result. Overall the book was a good read right before a tight race for the White House.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2000

    It's About Time

    Leon Uris has outdone himself. The author has written a powerful novel which speaks to the immediate issues facing America today, issues which, if not dealt with, will one day destroy us. He speaks the truth about political corruption, racism, terrorism, the Second Amendment, violence, and hate groups which will stop at nothing to uphold their particular brand of terrorism. Quinn O'Connell embodies all that is honorable and trustworthy, courageous and bold; so much so that we can only hope he could be real. But I did find hope here. I want so much to believe that there really is a person of such integrity who could lead our beloved nation out of its present climate of dirty politics, hatred, racism, and violence. I wish that everyone would read this book; and I am grateful to Leon Uris for planting seeds of hope in my heart.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2000

    author definitely gets his point across

    Leon Uris is getting older. That is clear in terms of his writing. However what he has to say far outweighs his writing style. His message of gun control,our fixation with the Internet, anti-semitism, etc.apparantly made his mark since you get his message. This was his goal. It has been well established that he is a wonderful writer. He didn't have to prove this again. It was his message that was important to him. He knew he had an audience and hoped that this audience would listen and act. Let's pray that it will be heard and that there will be some changes made.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2000

    Was This Really Written by Uris?

    I've read everything Uris has written, starting with Battle Cry, which I read three times straight through because it was so compelling. I bought A God in Ruins as soon as it came out, anticipating another great and thought-provoking story. I got something else. I'm not even sure I got Leon Uris ... has someone else stolen his name? Let me admit up front that after about 100 pages, I gave up, read the last chapter in hopes that I'd find something compelling enough to make me continue to plow through drivel, and abandoned even that faint hope quickly, so my review isn't as complete as others may be. But maybe this will save others the agony of even those 100 pages. This was a poorly-written, poorly-researched, pointless book. It wandered everywhere, basic facts were wrong (if you're going to make specific references to a real places, make sure they're accurate ... Brown University isn't in Newport ... or make up your own places), and the characters had no depth at all (although since they weren't all that sympathetic, maybe it's just as well we don't get to know them any better). The political bias is overwhelming (maybe Clinton really wrote this!) and the level of believability was non-existant. If I could return it for a full-refund, I would!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 1999

    An Author in Ruins

    It is sad to see an author renowned for his painstaking research, produce a flimsy work. Uris has produced a piece of left-wing propaganda, painting the fictional Republican president as evil incarnate and his Democratic challenger as perfect. His portrayal of the issues involved in the debate over the Second Amendment 'right to keep and bear arms', is incredibly simplistic when one considers Uris' scholarship. Each of his previous works brought us a profound understanding of an important confict. This book promotes conflict not understanding.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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