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Godless

Average Rating 4
( 38 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Posted October 30, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Me for TeensReadToo.com

    There is a reason that GODLESS won the National Book Award for Young People's Literature, and I don't believe it's because author Pete Hautman wrote a book he intended to be satire, as other reviews have suggested. To me, GODLESS is the epitome of everything that is both bad and good about organized religion--it is, in effect, an entreaty to the leaders of religions around the world to look at how blind faith funds their coffers. <BR/><BR/>Yes, maybe I'm reading more into the book than the author intended. If so, I can only hope that he appreciates the fact that I've obviously thought about the words he wrote long after they were published, and that he'd be happy about that fact. Now, though, on to the story... <BR/><BR/>Fifteen-year old Jason Bock is an agnostic ("I'll believe in God when I see Him") bordering on being an atheist ("There is no God"). His mother is obsessed over his health, coming up weekly with a new ailment that he just has to be suffering from. His father, though, is more concerned with his son's soul. That's why Jason, regardless of his personal beliefs, finds himself attending weekly Sunday Mass at the Church of the Good Shepherd, and even occasionally joins in at Thursday night TPO (Teen Power Outreach) meetings. The fact that he's ordered to attend the meetings more frequently when he's in trouble doesn't escape his notice. <BR/><BR/>Until one day, agnostic slash atheist Jason wonders what would happen if he started his own religion. Along with his best friend, Shin, fellow TPO attendee Magda, preacher's son Dan, and town rebel Henry, Jason creates the Chutengodians, a religion who worships the Ten-Legged One. That the Ten-Legged One is the town's water tower doesn't seem to deter them. <BR/><BR/>I know what you're thinking--who in their right mind would worship a water tower, even if they are teenagers? The answer, of course, is pretty simple. Why do people worship the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost? Why are there Buddhists, Muslims, Scientologists, Mormons, Protestants, or Latter Day Saints? Why does anyone worship anything? They do it because someone came up with their own ideas, made up some rules, implemented some commandments, created posts of leadership, and recruited parishioners. <BR/><BR/>Jason does the same, with some of the same consequences other organized religions have faced over the centuries--infighting, backstabbing, persecution, and doubts. When one Chutengodian almost ends up dead in an accident, and another seems determined to take his own life, and the others doubt the wisdom of associating with the creator of their religion, things start to fall apart. Sounds to me a lot like what happens in most "normal" organized religions found throughout the world today. <BR/><BR/>GODLESS is, without a doubt, one of the most thought-provoking books I've ever read. I highly recommend it to anyone searching for their own truths, regarding not only religion but finding your sense of self. You won't be disappointed--I know I wasn't.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Thought provoking

    A quick and enjoyable read that gets you thinking.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2014

    The guide to creating a new religion

    I ave adopted chutengodianism as my religion. I read this book as much as i can and i love it

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2013

    Great book

    If your looking for a great book read this it gies by quick i read it in one class period its worth the read

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2013

    Great book

    Read this book and it was a little hard for me to put down.

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  • Posted July 25, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Disappointing

    This book starts off really cool, with the main character creating his own religion and other kids joining and stuff, but then it doesn't go anywhere. It stalls out about halfway through, and the character doesn't really learn much by the end, and neither do you. I totally recommend The Atheist's Church over this book any day.

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  • Posted August 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great

    This is one of the most interesting books I have ever read!!!

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  • Posted October 12, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Move Over Poseidon, Here Comes a New God of Water

    In the story Jason Bock, the protagonist, is struggling with accepting his religion. His church group annoys him, causing his teenage mind to think up an extremely abstract religion. Being a leader, Jason finds several followers. Some jump on for the ride, others take it too far. Our poor, innocent protagonist looses all control of life and is sent into a downward spiral ending with the hospitalization of a friend, a confrontation with the law, and the loss of a true friend. I found the main idea of the book astonishing. Although the way the book was written I find very juvenile, the story had its truths. I can relate to this book because I recently had some of the same problems as Jason, which was the only reason I finished the book. I did not enjoy reading this book, but I enjoyed reading about the thoughts of the protagonist throughout the book. I would probably not recommend this book to anyone, because the people I've spoken to about the storyline laughed about it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2009

    It was decent.

    This book has a very interesting underlying message about what is means to be religious and have faith thus can raise some good questions to ask yourself. But other than that the story was minimal, and nothing extremely exciting happens. Although, the characters are well defined and Jason, the main charcter, can be pretty funny at times. So overall, a decent book, maybe if you find yourself question what it means to have faith check this book out, or if you're bored and want to laugh a little.
    :D

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2007

    an outstanding novel!

    i absolutely loved it!!!!! it was funny, thought provoking and exciting! i totaly agree with everything hautman says!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2007

    This Book is Funny!

    Pete Hautman's sense of humor is great. My friends and I have the same imagination and the idea is just funny. Note: this book isn't suppossed to be read with all out seriousness but to joke about it and just enjoy the creativity.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2007

    Wasn't Worth It

    This novel had one exciting part. I felt like most of this book was building up and concluding the ten pages of action. The idea of the book to begin with is crazy, and how obsessed the kids in the novel became with the crazy idea in the first place just makes it even worse. I mean to the point where kids are breaking bones and getting in trouble with the police, just to visit the water tower, or their made up 'god', just doesn't sound reasonable. The coming together of the characters is somewhat interesting though, just because they are so different from one another, but the fact that they all betray each other in the end and break apart ruins that. Overall this book wasn't worth my time, I don't suggest it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2006

    PETE HAUTMAN DOES IT YET AGAIN!!

    Pete Hautman has officially become my favorite author besides Anne Rice. In Goddless he takes a look at what it's like to doubt your faith. Through the eyes of his main charecter, he gives us a reason to question that which seems as solid as your religion,in a way that keeps you turning pages. Every book i've read by him has been a triumph and Godless is no exception, I simply couldn't put it down. If you enjoy a story with a seriouse meaning that doesnt take itself to seriously, then you have to read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2006

    amazing

    This book was great it had a great concept and it was a page turner. Even if your not into religion this is a good book to read. it's about teen troubles,friendship,and crushes.I would recomend this book to anyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2006

    All was well, expcept the ending.

    I loved the idea behind the tale, and i enjoyed it quite a bit. although the ending didnt have much closure, nor a decent resolution.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2006

    Courtesy of Teens Read Too

    There is a reason that GODLESS won the National Book Award for Young People's Literature, and I don't believe it's because author Pete Hautman wrote a book he intended to be satire, as other reviews have suggested. To me, GODLESS is the epitome of everything that is both bad and good about organized religion--it is, in effect, an entreaty to the leaders of religions around the world to look at how blind faith funds their coffers. Yes, maybe I'm reading more into the book than the author intended. If so, I can only hope that he appreciates the fact that I've obviously thought about the words he wrote long after they were published, and that he'd be happy about that fact. Now, though, on to the story... Fifteen-year old Jason Bock is an agnostic ('I'll believe in God when I see Him') bordering on being an atheist ('There is no God'). His mother is obsessed over his health, coming up weekly with a new ailment that he just has to be suffering from. His father, though, is more concerned with his son's soul. That's why Jason, regardless of his personal beliefs, finds himself attending weekly Sunday Mass at the Church of the Good Shepherd, and even occasionally joins in at Thursday night TPO (Teen Power Outreach) meetings. The fact that he's ordered to attend the meetings more frequently when he's in trouble doesn't escape his notice. Until one day, agnostic slash atheist Jason wonders what would happen if he started his own religion. Along with his best friend, Shin, fellow TPO attendee Magda, preacher's son Dan, and town rebel Henry, Jason creates the Chutengodians, a religion who worships the Ten-Legged One. That the Ten-Legged One is the town's water tower doesn't seem to deter them. I know what you're thinking--who in their right mind would worship a water tower, even if they are teenagers? The answer, of course, is pretty simple. Why do people worship the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost? Why are there Buddhists, Muslims, Scientologists, Mormons, Protestants, or Latter Day Saints? Why does anyone worship anything? They do it because someone came up with their own ideas, made up some rules, implemented some commandments, created posts of leadership, and recruited parishioners. Jason does the same, with some of the same consequences other organized religions have faced over the centuries--infighting, backstabbing, persecution, and doubts. When one Chutengodian almost ends up dead in an accident, and another seems determined to take his own life, and the others doubt the wisdom of associating with the creator of their religion, things start to fall apart. Sounds to me a lot like what happens in most 'normal' organized religions found throughout the world today. GODLESS is, without a doubt, one of the most thought-provoking books I've ever read. I highly recommend it to anyone searching for their own truths, regarding not only religion but finding your sense of self. You won't be disappointed--I know I wasn't.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2006

    teens + religion=bad news

    I picked up this book because I like theology and enjoy reading about it, especially in fiction. Jason is a 15 year old kid, an atheist, who along with his cronies creates a religion centered around the city's water tower--the Church of the Ten Legged God. Jason gathers his disciples, writes a bible with his buddy Schin, and holds something like worship meetings at the tower. After altercations with his parents and the moronic youth leader at his church, Jason holds onto his belief that he doesn't buy into Catholicism and will find his meaning in life outside of organized religion. The point seems to be this: even if the Catholic Church is bunk, something inside of us still cries out for order, for structure, for religion, whatever. The Catholic Church has its version, Jason has his. We are meaning-seeking creatures that create order out of life's chaos, God or no God. The biggest critique of the Catholic Church (in my view) is that it drives people straight to atheism. It can seem to unbelievable with all of its bizarre doctrines and creeds. Jason was an atheist because the Catholic Church drove him to it. Yet there was still something inside of him that drove him to seek 'something more.' Perhaps the message of 'godless' is that we all have to find our own way.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2006

    great book!

    This book is perfect for young adults.Any teen can relate to some of the characters. This story keeps you interested with a funny plot.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2005

    Entertaining but a little out there

    I was entertained but not satisfied. I read the book in one sitting, which speaks highly of its readability. The relationship between Jason, the main character, and Henry is what intrigued me the most but wasn't touched upon nearly enough. Also, Jason, doesn't change significantly. I felt the story ended without closure and without solving some of the major problems. Some parts were unrealistic and I found myself distracted from enjoyment because of that. Overall, I felt the book was unique, but could be more developed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2005

    Alright. Worth a look.

    Like a few people say, it's kind of mediocre. But only at the beginning. It's hard to start a book like this, and like many of its kind, Godless starts out like an author trying to be a teenager. But it gets better. As the plot progresses, you can understand the characters, and they seem more real. Instead of it seeming like Pete Hautam is writing trying to portray a teenager, he IS the teenager. I recommend this book to pretty much anyone. No matter what, everyone will get something out of this book. Just reading the back got me into it. Most definatelty worth a look, this book is an interesting read. I don't think I'll look at a water tower the same way again.

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews
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