Customer Reviews for

God's Battalions: The Case for the Crusades

Average Rating 4
( 37 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(20)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(5)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Interesting

Finally a much needed "Pro-Western" approach to studying the Crusades. Stark writes clearly and crisply on the subject and leaves no doubt as to his professional opinion on the subject. Time and again he comes directly to the point. In some cases this comes across as...
Finally a much needed "Pro-Western" approach to studying the Crusades. Stark writes clearly and crisply on the subject and leaves no doubt as to his professional opinion on the subject. Time and again he comes directly to the point. In some cases this comes across as axe-grinding or even bias, yet even so he makes a strong and valid case. I gave him a 4 on the research because at times it is difficult to determine from the footnote format just how well he researched the subject on both sides of the fence.

Content wise Stark concentrates primarily on the 1st Crusade and the events that led up to it. He broadbrushes the rest of the Crusades making several debatable generalizations. Militarily he does not go into a great deal of detail on the battles. He includes a brief synopsis of the Military Orders.

All this aside, it is a good read that brings up many points and issues sure to spark debate both about the past and the present situation in the Middle East. If you are at all interested in the Crusades and history you should read this book. At the very least it will help balance the scales. Enjoy!

posted by CaptWill on November 23, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

Leave history to historians

This author is completely off the mark.
He should stick to his specialty, or at least
consult some historians before writing this
kind of nonsense. If the point of this book
was to elucidate the societal differences
between the European (read Catholic) west and
o...
This author is completely off the mark.
He should stick to his specialty, or at least
consult some historians before writing this
kind of nonsense. If the point of this book
was to elucidate the societal differences
between the European (read Catholic) west and
other empires of the Middle Ages, this account
is sorely lacking in both depth and accuracy.
This is not the quality we would expect from
someone who teaches advanced studies... F grade.

posted by EARuet on December 20, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 review with 1 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted October 21, 2009

    Are you joking?

    The author of this book is a sociologist, not an historian of the Middle East, and certainly not of the Arabs or Islamic world. He may know Christian history somewhat, but he clearly has to depend on others for the Arab-Islamic side of the equation. Probably, if you are only able to read the Roman/Byzantine version of the event, you will get some idea like this, but the patent foolishness of it is plain.

    To wit:
    By 1099, the so-called "Islamic empire" was in tatters, with 5 or 6 kingdoms all vying for power. True, the Seljuks were on the offensive against Byzantium...in Anatolia, not the "Holy Land"! The first Crusade was mounted to support the Byzantines, and then diverted itself to attack Jerusalem. It was all downhill after that.

    What we see here is yet another reading back of contemporary issues and conflicts upon the past, a past that this author barely knows anything about. You can see it clearly in the review: the reference to "unwarranted Muslim terrorist aggression".

    I would ask Mr. Stark, who historically have been responsible for more "terrorism" and "aggression" than the Christian world?

    1 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 review with 1 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1