Customer Reviews for

Going Vintage

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

Going Vintage is a sweet, heartfelt story that will leave reader

Going Vintage is a sweet, heartfelt story that will leave readers wanting more of Mallory and her lists. 

Mallory’s life is great. She’s got a great boyfriend and never feels alone. Until she opens Jeremy’s computer to discover that she’s not the only girl in his life....
Going Vintage is a sweet, heartfelt story that will leave readers wanting more of Mallory and her lists. 

Mallory’s life is great. She’s got a great boyfriend and never feels alone. Until she opens Jeremy’s computer to discover that she’s not the only girl in his life. Heartbroken, Mallory swears off technology and pines for the simpler times of 1962 when her grandmother was a teen. 
Leavitt created a smart and witty character in Mallory. Her voice is refreshing. Unlike some characters, Mallory’s eclectic taste in clothes and even sports bobbleheads give the character more depth than I expected. I really enjoyed her quirks.

I also applaud Leavitt for the family dynamic. Mallory’s parents are happily married, and her little sister comes across wise beyond her years. It’s nice to see a novel explore the family in such a way that makes you want to become a part of this group of unique and fun people. 
The plot flows nicely, and the novel is a quick, entertaining read.

Recommendation: Fans of Sarah Dessen and Miranda Kenneally should definitely add this to their must-read list. 

posted by Read4YA on March 30, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Mallory is completely smitten with her boyfriend Jeremy, but whe

Mallory is completely smitten with her boyfriend Jeremy, but when she discovers he’s been having a long-distance, virtual love affair with some skank-ho with the screen name BubbleYum, she breaks up with him and humiliates him on Friendspace. A few days later, while cle...
Mallory is completely smitten with her boyfriend Jeremy, but when she discovers he’s been having a long-distance, virtual love affair with some skank-ho with the screen name BubbleYum, she breaks up with him and humiliates him on Friendspace. A few days later, while cleaning out her grandmother’s house, Mallory discovers a list of things her grandmother hoped to accomplish her Junior year of high school. This makes Mallory wonder what it would have been like to live in the 60′s, where things like being Pep Club secretary, making your own dress for homecoming and hosting a fancy dinner party are at the top of your “to-do” list. Mallory decides to find out. She’ll give up all technology (since it was at the root of her heartache anyway), dress in vintage clothing and try and accomplish everything on her grandmother’s list before homecoming. It seems easy enough, but Mallory didn’t plan on Jeremy being so clingy…. or hitting it off with Jeremy’s cousin, Oliver. Is she strong enough to stick to her laurels, or will these boys throw her off course?

Mallory was a cute and determined character. She seemed fairly average — not overly popular, but not a loner either. Her best friend is her younger sister, Ginnie, and while she has friends at school, there’s no one she’s especially close to. This is mainly because she’s been making out with Jeremy non-stop for the last year and hasn’t had time for friends.

Ginnie was cute and spunky and a lot more direct and outgoing than Mallory. She plays soccer and is good at pretty much everything she tries.

The two boys, Jeremy and his cousin Oliver, both serve their purpose to the story, but neither were particularly memorable.

The writing perfectly suits the story. Mallory is obsessed with making lists, and the book is peppered with them. Several of them made me laugh. The book is told from Mallory’s POV, and the voice was pitch-perfect. The story was light and cute, and the pace fit the book.

All in all, this was a cute book (in case I haven’t used that word enough). There was nothing wrong with it;  it just wasn’t for me. It’s light and fluffy, but for me, not overly engaging. I liked the idea of “going vintage”. I don’t think I could do it, even though I did manage to live  without cell phones, home PC’s and video games when I was in grade school.

Don’t get me wrong. This isn’t a bad book, it just wasn’t my cup of tea. It will definitely appeal to those who like their contemporary reads light, their characters spunky and their romance innocent.

posted by OtotheD on March 26, 2013

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  • Posted April 19, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Going Vintage by Lindsey Leavitt is a story almost everyone livi

    Going Vintage by Lindsey Leavitt is a story almost everyone living in this age of technology can relate to. It tells the story of Mallory, a girl who just found out her boyfriend has been having a secret relationship with a girl over an Internet game. But when she dumps him for being a virtual cheater she's the one who is publicly bashed on the Internet, causing her to swear off technology. It's a look at what it really means to disconnect from society. Is going vintage Mallory's way of disconnecting, or was she, even with her cell phone, email, and social networks, already disconnected from society?




    One of my favorite things about Going Vintage is the emphasis on family that you don't usually see in YA novels. A YA heroine's family is usually absentee, annoyingly infringing to the point of avoidance, or mentioned a few times in passing but never really introduced. Not the case for Mallory's family. Her little sister Ginnie is her best friend and her partner in her sixties shenanigans. Her parents, as much as she wants to avoid them at times, are still always present and their relationship plays a big role in the novel. Then there's Mallory's grandmother, the whole inspiration for her going vintage in the first place. The family bonds forged and fights had are right at the center of this novel and it's actually a lot of fun to read about.




    The romance in Going Vintage is one of those slow growing, ever changing kinds. It starts out as merely a friendship between Mallory and her ex's cousin, Oliver, but it's no surprise when things start to get more serious for these two. It's not an "Oh my God, he's so hot" or "She's so beautiful I can't take my eyes off of her" type romance. It's more like a meeting of two kindred souls who could become more to each other in the future. It was sweet and beautiful and refreshing to read.




    I really love the way every chapter starts with one of Mallory's lists. They were entertaining to read and usually very telling of what was coming up in a chapter. They left me wanting to come up with a list or two of my own.




    Going Vintage is a lighthearted, yet still poignant novel that takes a look at the ways technology has changed our society, and the ways it hasn't. Lovers of contemporary will fall in love with Mallory's quirky style and Leavitt's quirky sense of humor.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2013

    great plot

    It had a great plot but i thought mallory was being stuborn in the middle. I mean jeremy explained and tried really har to make things right but she just listened to what she thought.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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