Customer Reviews for

Grand Pursuit: The Story of Economic Genius

Average Rating 3.5
( 10 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    A very enjoyable read. Author has a very good grasp of the growt

    A very enjoyable read. Author has a very good grasp of the growth of economic knowledge and ideas. She has a gift for describing the lives, loves and motivations of the various characters who made significant contributions to the world's understanding of the "dismal science". Very rewarding to follow her unraveling of the insights and growth of some of the great geniuses in this most critical field.

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  • Posted June 1, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Economists are people, too, as journalism professor Sylvia Nasar

    Economists are people, too, as journalism professor Sylvia Nasar proves in her revealing book on the lives of the men and women who demonstrated “economic genius.” Starting with the 19th century and ending in modern times, she relates how writers, journalists, social activists and academicians turned the concepts of economics into practice. She delves into their personal lives to find the human aspects that informed their theories, while also weaving in the vivid historical settings that gave their lives context. From the tragedies of illness and death to the pangs of unrequited love, and even the scandals – one famous economist kept a “sex diary” – Nasar presents engaging, sometimes quirky portraits of the people behind the pronouncements. getAbstract highly recommends Nasar’s tracing of the history of modern human economic development – with its circling-back loops that mimic the booms and busts of the economies and societies her protagonists lived in – to those who love history, economics and a rousing good tale.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2012

    How Ideas Develop

    The book does much more than explain how thought about economics developed. It puts the development in a historical context and traces ties between changes in science and politics suggesting that the rules of economics are not eternal truths but reflections of other aspects of society. It is compelling yet can be digested in chunks. Thank you Sylvia Nasser.

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  • Posted January 19, 2012

    IIt's interesting but not well organized; you'd better know something about economics before you read it.

    This book rambles. It does not appear to have clear direction. It's generally sort of chronological, but sometimes wanders off that path. Economic concepts are referenced, but not explained, so if you're not versed in economics to some degree, you may have a problem.
    Nevertheless, it is interesting, and provides valuable historical perspectives on economic outlooks of key developers of economic theory. I enjoyed the book because I knew very little about economics and now have a little bit of a feel for it.
    If you know something about the subject and want historical perspectives, this is a readable and appropriate book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2011

    A Study In How Economics Evolved From Issues Of Scarcity

    This is a lively study of how economics evolved from issues of food scarcity, famine, during hard times in a more agrarian era, and how the issues of corporate finance, mass unemployment, and government policy complicate scarcity issues in more advanced industry-based and technology-based economies. Sylvia Nasar shows how each economist from Malthus to Keynes confronted issues in their own eras and developed concepts for analysis and measurement of economics questions. She makes each era come alive with documentary detail, giving us a "you are there" feel for the prevailing conditions of the time, and that is helpful in bringing practical urgency to the study of why certain concepts were developed in the sometimes "dismal science." -Mike Mooney

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    Posted March 13, 2012

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    Posted September 25, 2011

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    Posted June 9, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2011

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