Customer Reviews for

Gravity

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Great CD!

    I loved this CD. The deep, catchy lyrics are thoughtful and fun to sing along to, and unlike some CD's, all of the songs are distinct and unique. Overall a great buy, well worth the money!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The Pros and Cons of Gravity

    As a long-time fan of Our Lady Peace, it was quite a surprise to pick up my copy of Gravity and find that the band's style of music had changed drastically during the recording of the new album. Not only are the lyrics noticeably simplified, but also, the vocals are much deeper and huskier to the point that the rock star's trademark 'nasal' voice is now almost unrecognizable. The change is not necessarily for the worst, however; I enjoyed the smoother vocals and strong bass lines that define Gravity. Steve Mazur has proven a competent replacement for former guitarist Mike Turner. Producer Bob Rock has taken Raine Maida's lyrics and removed much of its cryptic quality, and as a result the songs are generally straightforward and rely less on metaphors to get their meaning across. Our Lady Peace has lost some of the uniqueness that originally made them stand out as one of the leaders in the world of rock music. Regardless of the new style, I grew to appreciate Gravity and found myself listening to it frequently. Fans will enjoy the fast-paced ''All For You'' and the anthemic ''Do You Like It'', the two opening tracks. The majority of Gravity¿s songs are easy to listen to and radio-friendly, perhaps a result of the band¿s becoming more mainstream. ''Sell My Soul'' is the odd one out. It has a slow, eerie quality that one grows to appreciate after a few repetitions of the CD. ''Innocent'', the new single and one of my personal favourites, is an uplifting song about facing personal fears and overcoming weakness. No matter who the audience, listeners will likely find themselves identifying with the story behind the lyrics and singing along. ''A Story About A Girl'' is an enigmatic song with a catchy, stuck-in-your-head melody interspersed with strong guitar riffs by Mike Turner (who makes three cameo appearances on the album). Lyricwise, ''Not Enough'' stands out as one of the calmer songs, yet is far from being dull. Raine's soulful vocals give a rugged quality to the song in what may be the one track most resembling Our Lady Peace's older works. Overall, I recommend Gravity to those who enjoy decent rock music that is just a tad unconventional. While critics will undoubtedly be pleased with Raine's new style of singing, it is likely that hardcore fans will miss the old sound they have become accustomed to. It is clear that Our Lady Peace is going through the process of rediscovering themselves as a band, of evolving and experimenting with new styles. Evolving... but into what?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Gravity offers something for everyone

    ''Gravity'', the newest release from the Canadien group Our Lady Peace, takes the band in a different direction from thier last release ''Spiritual Machines'' -- and it is a good direction. Gravity contains a good mix of heavy guitar riffs and calm, soothing, melancholy music. The change is noticed right away in the intro to the first track, ''All for you.'' The heavy guitar sound at the beginning of the song starts you on a musical journey through time. Looking at the title for track two, ''Do you like it?'' makes it seem as if the band is asking for the listener's opinion of the music. Many of the songs in the middle of the CD are easy to relate to for anyone who has ever been in a relationship ... good or bad. The smash hit ''Somewhere out there'' is track three on the CD and offers hope that a gone lover will return soon. Track four, ''Innocent'' has a good melody and offers some inspiration to people having a tough time with things in life. Two of the best tracks on the CD are also ones that offer hope and apologies for lost loves. On ''Sell my soul'', track seven, lead singer Raine Maida pleads for a lover to stay singing ''I hold on/I hold on/I'd sell my soul for you.'' The track has a very mellow sound and is probably the most moving one on the record. Along the same lines, is ''Bring back the sun,'' track nine. On this track, Madia proclaims that if you ''bring back the sun/we'll bury this hate/and build it with love.'' This is another moving song with a great melody. However, Madia wants you to know that he is far from a wimp when it comes to women. On tracks six and eight, ''Not enough'' and ''Sorry'' respectivley, the singer calls out his lover. On ''sorry'', he has finally had enough and can't take it anymore singing ''Sorry I can't lie/So I'll just say goodbye.'' All and all, this CD is just as great as all of the other CD's by this quartet -- which, along with Madia includes guitarist Steve Mazur, bass player Duncan Coutts and drummer Jeremy Taggart. The only complaint that I have is the lenghth of this CD. At just over 41 minutes, it leaves the listener wanting more.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Gravity Will Not Affect The Altitude Of This Album

    Upon the first listen of the latest Our Lady Peace album entitled, ''Gravity'', it is evident that it has been the most vigorous and energetic album to date. Much of this can be attributed to the addition of new guitarist, Steve Mazur. This album features more aggressive guitar playing, that former guitarist Mike Turner seemed to lack. Turner's absence from this album is conspicuous. Songs such as ''All For You'' and ''Made of Steel'', epitomize this aggression. The hardest vocal effort that I have heard from singer, Raine Maida, appears in the bridge of ''Not Enough'', where he turbulently shouts ''it's not enough'' repeatedly. Unfortunately, the band seems to lose some of their aesthetic qualities that were abundant in their previous, ''Spiritual Machines'' and ''Happiness Is Not A Fish That You Can Catch''. The name and inspiration from the preceding and most alluring album, ''Spiritual Machines'', was taken from Ray Kurzweil's ''The Age of Spiritual Machines(When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence)''. I feel that Raine best inhabits his artistic niche when he releases his high-pitched ululations on songs such as ''All My Friends'' and ''Are You Sad''. The only song on ''Gravity'' that reveals a vestige of this is ''Innocent'', when he states, ''I remember...''. Any true Our Lady Peace fan would realize that ''Gravity'' is a good album, but I do believe that they need to relapse into a pattern delineated in ''Spiritual Machines''.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Another Product of Bob Rock

    After hearing the first few tracks off of <i>Gravity</i>, the latest effort from Canadian quartet Our Lady Peace, it becomes obvious that Bob Rock was the driving force behind the follow up to their 2001 release <i>Spiritual Machines</i>. This record has a more corporate sound, which is characteristic of Bob Rock, but quite a change for OLP. The band is definitely at an advantage in this respect, though, as their new single ''Somewhere Out There'' remains in high rotation on radio stations around the U.S. <br> <br> Our Lady Peace has a very unique sound, which can be heard on any of their previous albums, but with the introduction of a new guitarist and producer comes a completely new sound. Raine Maida (lead vocals) has traded in his trademark falsettos for richer, darker vocals giving the band and even more generic sound. The song ''Somewhere Out There'' sounds eerily like Course of Nature's ''Caught In the Sun.'' And songs like ''Made of Steel'' and ''All For You'' lack depth and meaning, which is surprising coming from the intellectual Raine Maida, someone who's always been known for writing very contemplative lyrics. <br> <br> The new album has its high points with songs like ''Bring Back the Sun'' and ''Sorry,'' reminiscent of 1999's <i>Happiness...Is Not a Fish That You Can Catch</i>. This similarity is probably due to the presence of former guitarist Mike Turner on the tracks. Another song worth recognition is ''Innocent,'' the second single to spin off the record. Its positive and uplifting lyrics are a much needed break from the more recent wave of negative singles to pollute the airwaves, putting forth a message that no matter how bad things get ''we are all innocent.'' <br> <br> In the end, some fans might say that Our Lady Peace ''sold out.'' They left long-time producer and friend Arnold Lanni to work with the legendary Bob Rock, who produced a very commercial sounding album that was an immediate hit, getting them the most air play they've ever seen in the U.S. However, other fans might say that the band's success was long over due, and that Our Lady Peace is finally seeing the same success in the U.S. that they've enjoyed in Canada for the past ten years.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Show us your maple leaf!

    Fans of Our Lady Peace will gladly tell you that ''Gravity'', the Canadian rock group's 5th album, is a welcome addition to their collections. Adding a touch of aggression to their music, OLP (as they are often called for short) continues to evolve with each new offering. The band's recent separation with guitarist Mike Turner had only a slight impact on their work, much to the relief of worried fans. The band's new guitarist, Steve Mazur, was chosen because he ''fit like a glove''. His playing remains congruent with the bright, quirky style of music OLP fans have become accustomed to over the years. Longtime fans will no doubt enjoy the album and new listeners may find Gravity's aggressive undertones, catchy lyrics, and more traditional alternative-rock style appealing. The band¿s new single ¿Somewhere Out There¿, although somewhat of a hit, is a horrible example of what can be found on the CD. Clichéd and repetitive, the song adds little to the creative lyrics and sound the rest of the disc has to offer. Its only attribute is that it¿s catchy. The song¿s video, which shows the band playing the song and a girl climbing some staging, is also very disappointing. Both song and video are terrible examples of OLP¿s creative style and enthralling live performances. It¿s hard to compare Our Lady Peace to any other band. Fans of all genres of music have warmed to their energetic music. While OLP falls into a category that encompasses a huge number of bands, they manage to maintain their uniqueness and leave you feeling like you¿ve been treated to something special. Gravity may not be the best example of their unique flavor but it is far from generic. The tone of the album is more dark than usual, but is far from depressing. OLP hints at frustration born of materialism, forgotten ideals, and social pressures. With a little something for every alternative rocker, Gravity should please Our Lady Peace fans both old and new. It is definitely worth a listen.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Our Lady Peace does it again

    OLP has done it again with their new release, Gravity. Occasionally recalling hits from their previous 4 releases (most notably Happiness¿Is Not a Fish That You Can Catch), the Canadian group breaks new ground musically on this album. Songs such as the opener, All for You, and the increasingly gritty Not Enough bring back the edge seen on the band¿s earlier CDs, while the soaring Sell My Soul, Bring Back the Sun, and the debut single Somewhere Out There scream ¿radio-friendly¿. Raine Maida¿s lyrics still retain the dark optimism that led the band to their previous success, yet somehow seem more straightforward. This album seems destined to propel these rockers to the top of the charts.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Gravity, an OMA's Perspective

    Our Lady Peace has recently released their latest of 5 albums, Gravity. This album is their best since Happiness.... It starts off strong with ''All For You'', a seemingly angry song with a lot of edge and a hardness to their style that I haven't felt in their music since their first album. It is extremely refreshing. However edge and harshness are not the sounds that prevail on this album. Where Spiritual Machines was gritty and sometimes difficult to listen to, Gravity has, as the name implies, a very down to earth feel. Where complicated sounds and concepts laced Spiritual Machines, Gravity is very simple and laid back, and that is where the shine lays. One thing that sets Our Lady Peace apart from other rock bands of the same style (Matthew Good Band, for example) is Raine Maida's voice. Not only does he have a strong voice, but he utilizes his falsetto, which makes for a very interesting combination with the bass line on his songs. Something I have always loved about Our Lady Peace is their ability to take a very dark theme and make it melodic and somewhat pleasant. ''Do You Like It?'' speaks to me as a person in a very emotionally abusive, codependant relationship...yet beyond that they are breaking free. In life itself, this would be a very scary and nerve-racking event. The song, however, is very uplifting and encouraging, and I have always loved their ability to do that. Unfortunately this is not Our Lady Peace's best album. They still have not, in my mind, bested Happiness...but this album is a close second. I was disappointed right off the bat by ''Bringing Back the Sun''. The song is so ridden with deep bass that it is hard to hear the rest of the track. Not only the fact that the song is on the album, but that it is followed by a fairly good song, ''A Story About A Girl''. But there is always a silver lining around every storm cloud. I have never been able to dislike a song by Our Lady Peace for too long, so I'm sure in the future that I will grow to love ''Bringing Back the Sun.'' Honorary mention should be made about some of the less respected songs on their album. ''Innocent'', ''Made of Steel'', and ''Not Enough'' are all extremely good songs with the ability to be very good singles to release to the public. All in all, I think Our Lady Peace has put out a very very good album with a lot of public appeal. It is a very nice follow up to Spiritual Machines, which seemed more geared to the hardcore OLP fans who would understand the music a little more than the casual listener. They have taken their style and once again, adapted it to fit the ears of the casual listener but haven't forgotten everyone who loved Spiritual Machines. Thank You, Our Lady Peace, for releasing a gem such as Gravity.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The sleeping giant that is Gravity

    Over the past decade, Our Lady Peace has fought to impact the modern rock industry with their previous Arnold Lanni-produced efforts, which have gained them critical success from fans all across the globe. Ironically, what kept them from being held up to the likes of many other mainstream American artists was the very same thing that set them apart. Their songwriting approach on previous albums showed a more complex Our Lady Peace that devoted countless hours on the road and in the studio for perfecting the thundering bass, floating guitar riffs, raging vocals, and charismatic drumming that defined their polished yet distinctive sound. Now with the addition of guitarist Steve Mazur into the Maida-Coutts-Taggart core, Gravity has taken not so much a step back, but rather a step to the side from their previous work rhetoric. Tracks like ''Innocent'' and ''Story about a Girl'' reminisce in the shade of earlier woks, all the while telling a new story from the sounds heard within. ''All for You'' and ''Not Enough'' reveal a much darker and hard-edged side to group rarely seen on previous albums, but is also counteracted by the subtle intricacies of ''Bring Back the Sun'' and ''Sell my Soul.'' Overall, Gravity reveals a much more diverse Our Lady Peace that have stripped themselves of their standard songwriting approach and brought down their sound back to the bare essentials of rock. Producer Bob Rock's contributions provided the group with all the tools necessary for making Creed and other artists alike turn heads at the return of one of rock's best-kept secrets. So while the secret may be out, the talent of the group remains fixed. Much like 1999's Happiness¿Is Not A Fish That You Can Catch, Gravity is an experiment waiting to turn gold upon acceptance from fans of both old and new.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Our Lady Peace Brought Back By the Force of ''Gravity''

    Canadian rock heroes Our Lady Peace are back ¿ and in their purest rock and roll form since the release of their multi-million selling album ¿Clumsy¿ in 1997. The band¿s fifth effort, ¿Gravity,¿ (Sony Music Canada) gives their fans the chance to reminisce to the early days of Our Lady Peace past, with frontman Raine Maida¿s shadowy vocals and silhouetting callouts to listeners during tracks such as ¿Not Enough.¿ The eerie ¿Sell My Soul¿ shares an equally eerie musical parallel to the band¿s all-time biggest single ¿Superman¿s Dead.¿ Only this time, the subject matter is Maida¿s borderline love obsession and the associated risks he¿s willing to take to embrace this love. A reoccurring theme of ¿Gravity¿ is focusing on the present rather than the past or the future, as highlighted in the opening line to ¿Sorry,¿ in which Maida states ¿Today¿s a reason for living.¿ In addition, the album title is just one allusion to the space/celestial allegory visited throughout ¿Gravity,¿ most evident in the band¿s crossover pop single, ¿Somewhere Out There.¿ Although Maida¿s political and spiritual maturity has obviously led the band¿s efforts in a very new direction, the familiar musical layers so appealing to Our Lady Peace fans around the world linger conspicuously on the new album, including bassist Duncan Coutts¿ steady and menacing presence in numbers such as the opening track, ¿All For You.¿ And though the album lacks many of the instrumental solos that often garnish an Our Lady Peace tune, an occasional spotlight is devoted to the newest member of the Peace Patrol, guitarist Steve Mazur, and to talented drummer and longtime fan favorite, Jeremy Taggart. The grounds for a fifth release from any band are often relatively shaky, but with ¿Gravity,¿ Our Lady Peace has managed to grow enough both lyrically and musically to ¿make new fans but keep the old¿ by revisiting what made them famous in the first place. Overall, ¿Gravity¿ is uplifting, convincing and a bit motivational ¿ without coming off as cheesy or superficial, which could undoubtedly be the fastest way for a band to dig themselves a rock and roll grave. Instead, Maida uses the album to project his sincerity, share his insanity and attract new and old fans alike.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    review

    Our Lady Peace¿s newest album, Gravity, is their best one to date. The songs are altogether smoother and more flowing than their last album, Spiritual Machines, and are composed in a different style than OLP was seemingly going towards in their past albums. Part of Gravity¿s uniqueness from OLP¿s other albums may be contributed to their new guitarist, Steve Mazur, who helped bring a different sound to the album. It was also recorded and produced by Bob Rock, who certainly contributed in making Gravity work as well as it does. All ten songs of the album consist of interesting and charmingly simple lyrics written and sung by vocalist Raine Maida and backed up by bassist Duncan Coutts, drummer Jeremy Taggart, and guitarist Steve Mazur. Most of the songs are about love and the happiness/pain that it brings, and are written in a way that everybody who listens to them can in one way or another relate to. The tracks are full of heavy drum beats and bass, powerful guitar playing, and passionate vocals with occasional acoustical sections interwoven into a couple songs, such as the title track and first release Somewhere Out There. The album even consists of the track Innocent, which includes vocals by a children¿s choir. Gravity is catchy enough to interest teenager¿s, rocks enough to attract older fans, and true enough to their own style to satisfy the long-time fans. If you like bands similar to Pearl Jam and Incubus, you¿ll probably like this album. Gravity is one of the few albums this year that actually has intelligent lyrics, catchy music, and substance in every song.

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