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The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2012

    A Must Read

    I was glued to this book. It covers the wonderful refugees of Hungary, the great minds...Koestler, Capa, Teller, Oppenheimer, etc. It covers the time when Hitler was making his move in Europe to invade Hungary, Poland, etc. These men we learn about helped shape our world, they helped develope the Manhattan Project. I want to next read "Darkness at Noon" by Arthur Koestler. Please, do yourself a favor and read this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2011

    Highly recommended, as a non-fiction, biographical and historical reference to some of the greatest brains Hungary has ever produced.

    Even as a Hungarian, I have not known many of the details Kati Marton shares with the reader in the book. I have learnt not only of the lives and the achievements of these illustrious fellow citizens of mine , but of the life and ambiance in general in this era.
    I think the book is of interest of anyone who has ever have heard of these brave men who received the highest award for their knowledge, their art, their efforts in opening paths for the future generations, facing dangers and difficulties on their road to fame. is For Hungarians,in or out of the country at present, of any religion, I think this is a MUST, to connect them with their own past. A very enjoyable read also, due to Kati Marton's excellent and easy style.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2009

    Fabulous Gift

    I purchased this book for my Dad, the man who has everything and buys everything for himself. Mostly, gifts I give him do not excite him, but this book did. His background is pure Hungarian, so he found everything about the writing and research interesting and engaging. Yet, a reader doesn't have to be Hungarian to find this book a good read. My Dad shared stories from the book and they held my attention. What the people went through in this book is amazing, especially because they lived through so much, and not only succeeded in their lives, but had an impact on the world. Now that my Dad is done with the book, I want to read it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2008

    Marton's Inferno

    It is easy for readers to misinterpret why Kati Marton titled her book The Great Escape. It is assumed that she gave her book the aforementioned title because nine Hungarian Jews successfully escaped the biggest tyrant the world has ever seen. Although this supposition is formidable, it is inaccurate. In order to understand why Marton characterized the Hungarians¿ feat as a great escape, readers must look past the physical act of escaping (fleeing Budapest to live in the United States) and analyze the metaphysical aspect of each character¿s motivation. All of the men in this book, while living in Budapest, were subject to their own personal hell, which revolved around the pursuit of their passions. Each man wanted to do something or to be something, but due, unfortunately, due to their country¿s bigotry and fascism, their chances of finding jobs in their respective careers were minimal if not impossible. Marton defines the combined journey of these individuals as The Great Escape, not because each man survives and escapes from his own private torment, but because each person does it through the very goals that were once not feasible to pursue. It was not reasonable for Andre Kertesz to be a photographer. His family was poor and photojournalism was neither a lucrative nor existing career. To make matters worse, Budapest was becoming highly anti-semitic. Dignity had become a scarce resource. Trickles of it that were lucky enough to seep through racism¿s tough blockade were soon wiped away by the continuing onslaughts of hate. Hopelessness consumed the once culturally-enriched town. One can only imagine how a man is able to keep his sanity under such harsh and discouraging conditions. It is said that the only pre-remedy for lunacy is for a person not to see the object which causes the psychological distortion. Marton concurs by saying, ¿Through the camera¿s lens, Kertesz saw a different Budapest. He saw lights and shadows, ancient streets, and, beyond the city limits, a countryside of meandering rivers, and he saw them not as others saw them.¿ The very tool that used to bring the photographer neither money nor sustenance, was now freeing him from his country¿s misery. No longer was Kertesz bound to the agonies of man. The author voices, ¿His camera became his tool against the madness. In the midst of a slaughter, through his lens, Kertesz could isolate a moment of beauty.¿ With his camera, Andre resembled Zeus and the rest of the Greek gods able to ascend the steps of Mount Olympus at will, drinking sweet ambrosia, and watching the mortals as they toil and reap the Earth. His camera had indeed given him power over his dark, depressing world, but it had also given him another gift: the drive and the determination to seek out other worlds and see what beauty he could extract from them. Kertesz¿s utilization of this gift can be seen in any respectable photo art gallery around the world. His pictures are truly awe-inspiring, but most importantly they represent his triumph over life¿s challenging obstacles. Andre Kertesz is just one of the several other characters mentioned in The Great Escape who used their talents to overcome hardships. This book should be recognized and commended for its poeticism. The author brilliantly patterns the book much like Dante¿s Inferno each Hungarian leasing a pit of Hell characterized by the level of adversity that he faced in Budapest. By pursuing their passions, the men were able to manifest a key to Satan¿s fiery gates and escape to the open air of paradise.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2008

    The Nine Heroes

    The Great Escape by Kati Marton describes nine Jews who were able to escape and make a difference in the outcome of World War II. These Budapest scientists such as Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, and Eugene Wigner all contributed in defeating Hitler and his Nazi regime. They felt it was in their utmost interest in deterring the Axis Powers from becoming victorious in this war. They did so by notifying Washington of the German¿s intention of creating an atomic bomb and wiping out the United States off the face of the Earth. However, the Germans were too slow in creating the atomic bomb because these Hungarian scientists were among the most skillful, in the Manhattan Project, to help build the hydrogen bombs, and put an end to this horrific war. It was because of these scientists why a person such as me, a Hispanic, is capable of writing this review today. If Szilard, Teller, and Wigner, would have never contributed to the Allies triumph in World War II, Hispanics, blacks, Jews, homosexuals, etc. may have been exterminated by the Nazi¿s genocide. Hence, the nine Jews who fled from anti-Semitism helped change the world. John von Neuman, developer of the electronic computer and the Game Theory, filmmakers Michael Curtiz and Alexander Korda, author Arthur Koestler, photographers Robert Capa and Andre Kertesz are the other commendable Hungarians described by Kati Marton. In their own unique way, they all helped warn the world of Hitler¿s malevolence. The one particular person who interested me the most was director Michael Curtiz. He grew up in Budapest where everyone had their own particular dreams and valued ¿learning, education, and culture¿ (p. 17). He owned a café called ¿New York.¿ A café with this name says it all. It gives people a sense of freedom and liberty to think, write, or do whatever they please. And all this was done in his café. When Germans started turning Europe into Nazism, he fled from home to America. This dream became reality as he directed arguably the best romantic film ever in Hollywood, ¿Casablanca.¿ This film symbolized the Americans isolationism with World War II as Lisbon tried remaining neutral throughout the film. Later he would say ¿that I am living ¿ not surrounded by American mansions ¿ but gazing at the hour hand of the clock at the New York Café, through the mist, at dawn¿ (p. 15). Even though the Germans had temporarily taken over his homeland, they cannot take over their dreams, beliefs, and their role in shaping the Nazi¿s defeat. Kati Marton did a fascinating job in praising these individuals for their efforts in making the difference during World War II. It makes me grateful to think God was on our side to bring these heroes with the power, intelligence, and determination to defeat the Germans and have their marks resting in history.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2008

    The Great Escape by Kati Marton - Luis

    The Great Escape is a very good book about nine Hungarian Jewish men who escaped from Hungary in order to be able to improve and impact the society with their actions. Each made a huge contribution in different fields, such as science, photography, film, and writing. So, they changed the world by escaping Hitler. All experienced World War II, and later they went to other countries for example, seven of them came to America, and the other two went to England. After they escaped, each of these nine Hungarian Jews had a big impact on different fields, making huge improvements. For example, physicists Eugene Wigner, Edward Teller, Leo Szilard, and John von Neumann 'computer' made big innovations in the field of science and they were so intelligent that they were able to start the nuclear science. The hydrogen bomb, for example, was created by Edward Teller. Film directors Michael Curtis and Alexander Korda made contributions in the field of theater, as Arthur Koestler made in the field of writing. Andre Kertez and Robert Capa made unbelievable changes in the field of photography. As you can see, all of them made innovations in different fields and they had a big impact on their home countries. They changed their lives and ours at the same time. It is not easy to do what these nine men did, because at that time of Nazism was so penetrating and control was so strict that the people did not even think of the possibility of escaping. Their determination to change the world made them mentally stronger, so they were able to achieve all of their dreams and achievements. Everybody can change the world, or at least contribute to that change, as these men did. But, there are two ways of changing the world, the good way and the bad way. These nine Hungarian Jews changed the world in a good way, because their actions were all positive. Consequently, if you have a positive mind, you will achieve positive results, as they achieved. They did not only change the world in their respective fields, but also, they changed it culturally and politically. Therefore, their accomplishments were very important for the actual world, and all of these accomplishments were reached because they were able to flee from Adolf Hitler. I really enjoyed reading this book, because it puts me in their situation, which was not easy at all. Also, this book brings me a lot of motivation to never give up in any situation, and this means that you should fight until you get the results or achievements that you want.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2008

    The Nine

    The Great escape by Kati Marton shows what passion, will, and determination did for nine brave souls who dared to defy evil and begin a life away from the home that gave them all their talents, Budapest. The biography of these men and how they survived to become pillars of science, entertainment, and art is truly a blinding light of hope and what we as a society can expect in the future. The readers follow the lives of Alexander Korda, Micheal Curtiz, Andre Kertesz, Robert Capa, Arthur Koestler, John Von Neumann, Eugene Wigner, Edward Teller and Leo Szilard those are names of real people who were lucky enough to survive the catastrophe of war and anti-Semitism. Theses men knew nothing of survival during wartime they were not soldiers and were in any way prepared to go through the ordeal of losing their homeland to Nazis and traveling virtually half way around the world to be safe. Some may think that it was an easy task, but it must be considered that these are the same men that made it an easy task to enjoy some of the comforts we have today such as nuclear power and computer just to name a few. The readers can find a hero in any of these gentlemen. Koestler and his bravery to speak his mind in the face of imprisonment, Capa being courageous enough to be in the middle of warzones photographing knowing that death lurks behind every street corner some may enjoy Kertesz and his ability to capture beauty and peace in every shot of his camera. There are many reasons to feel for any of these men, but the most potent being the loss of their hometown of Budapest. All of them decided what they wanted to be in the bars and cafes that populate this Hungarian hub. The reader can truly understand and feel their heart fill with sorrow when these men came to the realization that they may not be able to return home. In modern times, many cultures have experienced similar situations ranging from communist Cuba, war torn Iraq, or fleeing Haiti¿s poverty and civil war. No person should have to face persecution on the ground they were born on, but none ever leave their ¿Budapest¿ behind. Curtiz for example showed what a Hungarian café was like in his most famous of films Casablanca. World War two will still live in infamy as the time we lost the most, but in return we have gain these nine men and much more. Any person can enjoy this book just from the time line it is based upon, any person who has experienced any type of homesickness, persecution, loss or just being down on your luck will smile with glee knowing that these men faced the greatest threat the world has seen and escaped it¿s claws to find home and new beginnings in America.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2008

    A reviewer

    Throughout Marton¿s book, Michael Curtiz was the character that appealed to me the most because he pursued something that he loved, felt passionate about, and even against all odds, was able to live his dream: to make it in the film industry. He never gave up he experienced war, persecution, and the hardships of leaving everything he knew behind, all in the hopes of just being able to survive without fearing for his life because he was a Jewish Hungarian. I love the way Curtiz took his feelings and memories and poured all his emotion into two hours of film on screen. He used his experiences to influence the settings of his movies and directed one of the most memorable American classics of all time, Casablanca, which is still well known today. Curtiz overcame many obstacles in his lifetime and I still have no idea as to how he became so successful. He had to learn English, tried to communicate his innovative ideas to Hollywood producers, got funding for his films, and directed them in a signature fashion that could only be categorized as 'Curtiz'. Although I do not remember every detail about his life that I read from The Great Escape, I connected with Curtiz because I love the premise of movies and how one great film can change your life or help you escape from reality. I never knew about Michael Curtiz before I read this book, but now I am grateful for Marton's insight because I was able to get a glimpse of the life of a true artist, someone who will risk everything on the chance to become something. I really enjoyed reading Kati Marton's book and learning about nine different men and how they influenced the world I live in today. This book provided me with many pieces of history that I had missed I had never heard of any of these nine Hungarian Jews in my life, which shocked me since they all accomplished so much. At times I was confused between the characters, since most of them changed their names to lesser sounding Jewish ones, and because Marton has a tendency to jump from one man to the next without warning. I had to concentrate to make sure that I would not mix up each of the nine men's life stories because even though they all fled Hungary to escape Hitler, each of them had different paths to his eventual success. Marton does a wonderful job throughout her book, describing vividly how Hungary looked and felt during its Golden Age before war loomed and caused its prosperous growth to end. The way she intertwines the lives of nine different people through their actions within the same year is incredible, showing how one person is living on the street, while another is in a hotel her contrasting as well as her paralleling between nine lives is very impressive. She succeeds in creating a cohesive story about how nine Hungarian Jews, all of whom were not in each other's company until later on in life, fled Hitler and changed the world. From scientists to photographers, movie directors, and a writer, this group drastically influenced the world, yet somehow the world does not seem to know who these men were or what they helped to accomplish. Through Marton's book, names like Curtiz, Von Neumann, and Szilard will always be remembered and the lives of nine ordinary men with their extraordinary world impact will leave an impression of wonder as to how they all became so successful, despite their hardships, which no one should hope to experience in their lifetime.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2008

    The Great Escape

    Enthralling, insightful and hard to put down describes the plot of The Great Escape. Not a fan of biographical writing, I find myself in shock after reading over 200 pages of a biographical text and discovering I wanted to continue. Impressive, indeed, is the story of these ¿nine Jews who fled Hitler and changed the world.¿ From scientists to photographers, Kati Marton tells the story of several individuals who impacted the world in enormous ways, yet not much recognition was given to them. Everyone remembers Albert Einstein for the Manhattan Project, but what about those great minds which were even more involved than Einstein himself? We all remember The Great Dictator, but would it have been made, if it was not for Alexander Korda¿s telling Chaplin that he should make a movie satirical to Hitler¿s persona since they were similar in appearance? Although dull at moments, Marton executes an ingenious performance in depicting a pulsating pre-War ambiance of Europe and the United States. Yet, she does not diverge from the great minds: Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, John von Neumann, and Eugene Wigner, four scientists whose desire to see an oppression-free society led to their involvement in the creation of the nuclear bomb for the United states: Arthur Koestler, author of Darkness at Noon Robert Capa and Andre Kertesz, war photographers etc. With Marton¿s insights of these individuals, the plot manifests itself as an academy-winning picture. Once Marton finishes the introduction of the characters¿quantum physics being a bit boring at times¿drinking a glass of warm milk is the only rest you want to have. The plot reflects the plot of your weekly TV shows: every sentence a scene and every ending period an annoying commercial. As you flow through the book, attaching to any one character becomes most difficult. All the characters have influenced humanity enormously: Szilard¿s eureka von Neumann¿s elegant calculations Capa¿s daring pictures. Even though the Manhattan Project is the most awaited part of the story, ruling out the other characters would be committing a sin. Capa¿s last scene, taking pictures during the battle at the beaches, shakes the floor in which the reader stands. As Ernest Hemingway said, 'all you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence you know.' With The Great Escape, Marton found her true sentence, which includes even more face-lifting sentences like Arthur Koestler¿s journey in writing Darkness at Noon. The Great Escape, although not your usual book, will give you a new perspective in history and a different point of view in what could have been the greatest discovery in history up to now. Coming from a non-enthusiast in the realm of biographical writings, The Great Escape is an excellent read. The content is superb, knowledge enriching, and summarily apt at changing our perspective of history. William Faulkner once said ¿you must always know the past, for there is no real Was, there is only Is.¿ If these men¿s tales would not be told, hearts would ¿beat on with a muffled sound.¿

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2007

    A reviewer

    The Great Escape, by Hungarian author, Kati Marton, illustrates the impact of nine Hungarian men who used their knowledge and talents to change the world forever. Not only were these men Hungarian, but they were Jewish as well. Living in central Europe as a Hungarian and Jewish person was not easy. Luckily, however, all nine men were able to flee Hungary before World War II broke out. Of the nine who escaped Hungary, four of the men were very intelligent men, who changed the field science eternally. John von Neumann, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner, and Leo Szilard were the four scientists. These men were able to advance the field of nuclear science, as well as introduce the era of computers. Kati Marton does a great job of detailing the lives of these four influential figures and how they interacted with one another during their lives. Aside from the scientists, there were also two film makers, two photographers, and one writer discussed in the book. The film makers were Alexander Korda and Michael Curtiz, both very influential people in the film industry. Curtiz¿s ¿Casablanca¿, was a ground breaking phenomenon which changed the movie industry forever. ¿The Third Man¿, was a movie produced by Alexander Korda, which was one of his breakthrough films that helped establish his place as one of the great film makers of his time. The two photographers mentioned in The Great Escape are Robert Capa and Andre Kertesz. Robert Capa is most famously remembered for his first pictures of D-Day as well as being the first photographer killed in Vietnam. Lastly, Arthur Koestler, was the writer whose main pieces of work concentrated on Zionism and Communism. His work, Darkness at Noon, is perhaps his most important and it discusses communism. All in all, it is a wonderful historical book which gives the reader a glimpse back to the past of post World War I all the way up to post World War II. It also depicts the strong bond Hungarians have with one another, whether living in the United States, Western Europe, or Central Europe, their language and origin unite them.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2007

    Unexpected

    Honestly, as a freshman in college, I thought that this would be yet another boring war history book full of facts and pointless information that would be uninteresting. However, after having the privilege to read it, I believe that The Great Escape illustrates an important, untold standpoint of the lives of Jews during WWII. I found it interesting that Kati Marton didn¿t just focus on the life of a Hungarian, but she was ultimately able to tell her readers the story of nine men who eventually became part of the American lifestyle and culture, even to present day. By portraying the life of all of these men, she showed us the struggle and sacrifices that were made by them and others like them to escape. She does it in a very episodic way making it more interesting and making it more attractive to younger readers. In addition, the book also includes useful information of the history of each man such as charts, maps, and photos which show the reliability of the research that was completed. The only factor that was a little difficult was the fact that even though the plot of each man¿s life is told periodically, sometimes jumps and cuts take place that are somewhat confusing. Besides the cuts, I believe that this book is very readable, and interesting. Not only did this book include factual information, but it also inspired me. If these men who lost so much were able to become great, it made me think that no matter what circumstances one may encounter, they can still reach their ultimate goals. These men where mere Hungarian Jews who probably never thought anything of themselves, yet they became famous scientists, filmmakers, photographers and writers. This book tells their lives and shows their determination for greatness. Kati Marton provided me with an insight to WWII that I have never received before.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2007

    A reviewer

    The Great Escape is an incredible story that really sheds light on an important piece of World War history. Author Kati Marton, who is Hungarian herself, uses her passion to display the significance of the ¿nine men who changed the world¿. In the story the nine men are not only Hungarian, but also Jewish, both not very popular crowds at the time. The novel tells of them fleeing Budapest to break away from persecution. The group was extremely gifted and intelligent. John Von Neumann, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner and Leo Szilard all became renowned scientists who impacted the entire world. Alexander Korda, Micheal Curtiz, Robert Capa and Andre Kertesz took a large role in film and photography. Products of these men were things such as `The Manhattan Project¿, the H-Bomb, the first computer, and some of the world¿s most celebrated films and photos. The fact that these men played such an important role at their time and in history is obviously remarkable, but after reading this book I noticed more. At the time, Jewish men like them were being killed by the masses. Instead of being thrown into concentration camps they chose to take the chance, escape, and go above and beyond surviving. Their story is one of courage, struggle, and hope. They are the case in point that proves to us all that if we have the will, anything can be achieved. This story truly inspired me personally and will always affect my outlook on and challenge or bad situation. This book is a definite ¿must read¿, a story that you should not miss out on.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2007

    A reviewer

    Kati Marton¿s The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World is a remarkably entertaining multifunctional book that manages to be a novel, historical work, and a biography simultaneously, and whose main purpose is to document the achievements of some of the greatest geniuses of the 20th century: scientists Eugene Wigner, Leo Szilard, and Edward Teller mathematician John von Neumann motion picture directors Michael Curtiz and Alexander Korda photographers Robert Capa and Andre Kertesz and writer Arthur Koestler. Set during the beginning of the 1900s, the book spans 100 years, and chronicles the lives of nine Hungarian Jews who fled their country because of war. The experiences that these men lived through, their childhoods and teenage years during Budapest¿s Golden Era 'before the Great Wars' and their adulthoods as exiles, proved to be the fuel that propelled their desire to make their mark on the world. And they all did: three helped create the atomic bomb one changed the world by inventing the modern computer another two directed some of the most important pop-culture American and British films yet two more captured the atrocities of war in photographs and developed modern photography and the last man brought to light the brutality of the Soviet Union through his writings. Marton¿s fantastic narrative allows us to effortlessly read through the book as if it were merely a novel about war, survival, and success: an outbreak of anti-Semitism in Hungary 'and then Germany and France' forces these men to flee their country, only to have to flee again with the rise of Nazism in Germany nonetheless, each strives to and ultimately accomplishes lifetime achievements that profoundly change the world. As a biography, Marton documents in detail the lives of these men from childhood to adulthood, and in the process analyzes their personalities and the external and internal motivations that drove these men to their successes. These two functions, novel and biography, mesh into a seamless work that keeps you turning page after page. Personally, my favorite part of Marton¿s books is its function as a historical work. The book manages to involve the reader completely and it immerses them into early 20th century Europe. Budapest is wonderfully described in the beginning of the book and Marton manages to make the reader feel the passion, creativity, and energy that enlightened the city at that time. With the same detail that Budapest is described, Marton continues to illustrate each stage of her nine Hungarian men's lives within the wonderfully portrayed context of time and place and occurrence. She does this, not only for entertainment value, but because those external influences were so important in the development of these men and the eventual outcome of their lives. All in all, the lives and achievements of these nine Hungarian not only changed the whole world but also changed my view on the linguistically isolated country, Hungary. I highly recommend Marton¿s The Great Escape. Marton¿s skill with the written word created a book that is not only exciting and entertaining but instructive and inspirational, too.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2007

    A reviewer

    Kati Marton is a great writer and did a great job in writing The Great escape. The Great Escape is about nine outcast whom which were both Hungarian and Jews who fled there homeland due to the country¿s hate against there religion and beliefs. They eventually went on to contribute to there individual fields and actually have a big impact on mankind. I highly recommend this book to anyone. It is well written and very interesting. Marton did a terrific job in shadowing the environment of WWII while still focusing heavily on the lives and journey of the nine Hungarian Jews. I truly was touched by this book in many ways. I to am Jewish and have been inspired by the nine Hungarian Jews focused on in this book. Seven of the nine made there homes in America and took part in the Manhattan Project, the H Bomb and the first computer Eniac. While the remaining two made there homes in England and are responsible for some of the most famous photographs ever to be published. Marton did a great job in bringing these nine men and there journey and escape to life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2007

    An Inspirational Must Read

    I new this was going to be a great novel after the introduction. The author Katie Marton begins the introduction be giving background information of our characters while also mentioning many important Jews of the era that were not included in the book. The most appealing part of the introduction is the passion that is felt in Marton's writing. She is a Hungarian Jew herself therefore making the book more meaningful and emotional for her. She speaks about her own families struggles through the World War I and describes the persecution that Jews were subjected to. The body of the novel follows the journey of 9 Hungarian Jews. The underlying message of the book attempts to convey how there were many great Jews who came out of Hungary during its short Golden Era, and if it were allowed to flourish, who knows how many more great Jews would have been produced? I don't want to make the novel sound like it is solely glorifying Jews. It is a tale of a handful of great Jews who also managed to accomplish commendable feats. From developing the Hydrogen Bomb to writing one of the best films ever made, these Jews went above and beyond their mortal calling to leave their mark on the world. The most amazing thing about the whole journey was the adversity, persecution, trials and tribulations that thes Jews had to endure and overcome in order to reach their given destiny. The novel makes for a great read and reads rather smoothly and quickly. It is very entertaining and extremely touching. No matter what your ethnic background is, you will feel a sense of empowerment after you read this novel. Success and happiness is obtainable for anyone after seeing what these Jews did to accomplish their dreams.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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