Customer Reviews for

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Great Text, Wonderful Guide

Oberon Zell Ravenheart is indeed a master. He has taken his years of study and experimentation and arranged it in a complete course to offer everyone. His methods are tried and true. He has worked with many people in the magickal community to make this book of instructi...
Oberon Zell Ravenheart is indeed a master. He has taken his years of study and experimentation and arranged it in a complete course to offer everyone. His methods are tried and true. He has worked with many people in the magickal community to make this book of instruction possible. He helped design a magickal living community in California where his lessons are put to use in the ¿real¿ world. He also raises unicorns as a part of his life. He also sculptures statues that are used in ritual or for decoration. This book is formatted in easy to use and understand lessons. The book describes each color level, out of the 12 listed in the book, and gives lessons to learn in each section. This is the basic level of learning, or the apprentice level, for those interested in pursuing true wizardry at it¿s finest. This book is geared towards the 11-18 year age group but adults will not be disappointed by what is inside. Some lessons are very basic while others are more advanced which will appeal to the adult. If this book is interesting enough to where you want to learn more, check out the Grey School of Wizardry where these lessons are taught. The lessons here are offered online in each corresponding color and class. The Grey School Faculty expand on some of these classes as well. If interested in this book and the Companion volume, check out the FAQ and other sections at greyschool.com. You will not be disappointed in what you find and you may find that the way of the wizard is for you.

posted by Anonymous on March 9, 2006

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Missing the Magic

I have just finished reading the book GRIMOIRE FOR THE APPRENTICE WIZARD by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart and would like to share some of what I found. The book is marketed to the Harry Potter fan. It¿s cover design, title, and references to Harry Potter both on the cover ...
I have just finished reading the book GRIMOIRE FOR THE APPRENTICE WIZARD by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart and would like to share some of what I found. The book is marketed to the Harry Potter fan. It¿s cover design, title, and references to Harry Potter both on the cover and throughout the entire book clearly indicate this. For example, the on the back cover is ¿Out of the millions of Harry Potter fans worldwide, there are tens of thousands who want to really do the magical things J. K. Rowling writes about. But would-be wizards must rely on information passed down from wizard elders. Is there a Hogwarts anywhere in the real world? A real Albus Dumbledore? Where is the book these aspiring wizards need? Luckily for all these fans, male and female, Oberon Zell-Ravenheart, today¿s foremost genuine wizard, has written this essential handbook.¿ The book is designed to look like a book from the library of Hogwarts too. To me, this is misleading and shameless! Children will want the book thinking they will be flying around on brooms, changing friends into toads, causing books to float around their class- rooms, and this will not occur. The parents will purchase the book thinking that it is somehow related to the Potter series, never realizing that it is teaching the children things that they may not wished their children exposed to for a myriad of different reasons. The material within the book is, well interesting. It covers everything from science, to woodsmanship, from astrology to topology. It tries to be the ¿all-in-one¿ source for just about everything. Some things fit, others just don¿t. In a way, this book reminded me of my Boy Scout Manual. This book is more a guide for Oberon Zell-Ravenheart¿s own eclectic brand of ¿Wizardcraft¿ than anything else. He melds Wicca, Ceremonial Magic, Shamanism, and pieces of other disciplines into one hodgepodge of ritual. (In my opinion, each of these different systems should have been recognized, and given their own sections.) This was done throughout the book, and when he did devote a chapter to a specific system, he mixed pieces of other systems with it. I do not agree with the section on ¿Conjury.¿ Jeff McBride, who wrote much of this section, encourages the ¿student wizard¿ to mix conjury with ritual magick. The student is taught several different effects, including the use of invisible thread, flash paper, dragon¿s breath, and more to accomplish this. To me, this practice tends to blur the line. The author also expresses opinions as fact, and many of these opinions are at odds with modern science. An example of this is his views on ¿dragons.¿ He mixes the term dragons with dinosaurs. And he states that dragons had poor night vision and only hunted during the day, and that they did not climb trees. A child using this ¿information¿ in school might find himself ridiculed. The book is inconsistent in its style as well. The reading level varies anywhere from 4th grade to 12th grade, it makes analogies that would not be understood by today¿s child (i.e. Dick Grayson and Wayne Manor) and the author passes of quotes from fantasy novels as authoritive quotes on the subject. He also takes bits and pieces of religious writing and scripture, form various religions, out of context to support his statements. There is a lot I take issue with in this book, but there are some good points. Zell-Ravenheart has included many tables, charts, and other pieces of information that one would have to look-up in many different books, in this book. He even includes a bestiary, although it looks like an abbreviated version of TSR¿s ¿MONSTER MANUAL¿ for AD&D. One could almost use this as a single sourcebook for information on Magick, provided the person was educated enough to identify the elements for what they really are, and ignore the misinformation that may accompany them.

posted by Anonymous on March 21, 2004

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2005

    Helpful for reference

    The book did include helpful charts and such, tidbits of information here and there, however much of the text is very targeted towards younger readers. If you are experienced in magic, this book will most likely not help you, and if you are new to it, I would not reccomend it to you either, for reason that it does not provide enough direction for an aspiring magician. If you have surpassed the beginners level, and are just looking for an extra book, pick this one up. But other than that, I dont reccomend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2004

    AWSOME BOOK

    This book is great for well the apprentice wizard. It has great everyday spells and tons of of different types of wizards you can be. I really recomend this book.

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