Customer Reviews for

Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare Library Series)

Average Rating 4.5
( 606 )
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(419)

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(76)

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(48)

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(28)

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(35)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

17 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

A reviewer

This review is not of Hamlet itself, but rather on this edition of Hamlet 'ISBN: 9781411400344', which was edited by Jeff Dolven and David Scott Kastan. I read a lot of heavily annotated books, and I have to say this is one of the best book designs I¿ve ever encountered...
This review is not of Hamlet itself, but rather on this edition of Hamlet 'ISBN: 9781411400344', which was edited by Jeff Dolven and David Scott Kastan. I read a lot of heavily annotated books, and I have to say this is one of the best book designs I¿ve ever encountered. The various reference materials (footnotes and definitions for archaic words) appear in a manner that makes the text very easy to follow. The scholarship is also top-notch. The annotations give you enough information to make things clear, without insulting your intelligence, or without overburdening you with unnecessary detail. The essays are also interesting and informative. I¿ve been avoiding Shakespeare ever since high school, which was many years ago. Now that I¿m reading him again, I¿m glad I¿m in such good hands. It is making the experience a joy, rather than a chore. My compliments to the editors and the book designer. They have done a superior job of making this difficult text accessible to the modern reader. I wish my editions of Dante and Milton had similar layouts. Highly recommended.

posted by Anonymous on November 9, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Pageperfect font too small/Footnotes on separate page awkward on Nook Color

The font size is the equivalent of the smallest size possible on a regular Nook Book. Since one can't adjust the font size on a Pageperfect Nook Book, that makes it difficult to read.

Also, the 2-page format (footnotes on left page, text on right page) is very awkwar...
The font size is the equivalent of the smallest size possible on a regular Nook Book. Since one can't adjust the font size on a Pageperfect Nook Book, that makes it difficult to read.

Also, the 2-page format (footnotes on left page, text on right page) is very awkward. Footnotes should have been done with popups initiated by touching the subscript number of the footnote. Much more elegant, and might be programmatically similar to the "Article View" pop-up window function for magazines.

Difficult words are translated in the left-hand margin of the text page itself, and line numbers are provided in the right-hand margin. Margins are too wide, which helps explain why the font has to be so small to fit everything on the line.

posted by RobinBaker on December 21, 2011

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  • Posted February 17, 2009

    Great Buy...

    A great way to really get into Shakespeare's world. Clean, clear print, excellent notes and articles, awesome story, and, of course, the one of the world's greatest playwrights.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2007

    Complexity cannot go without emotion..

    The complexity found in this play is a beauty of its own. For Hamlet, problems continually arise for him in the utmost unbearable of times. First, Hamlet is forced to come home due to a sorrowful cause, his father¿s death. But while he is home for his father¿s funeral and burial, he is presented with the news of his mother¿s untimely marriage to his unfavorable uncle. As if things couldn¿t get any worse, he then is confronted by what he believes, is his father¿s dead spirit, and is convinced that he was murdered by none other than the man his mother is about to wed. As the play continues, Hamlet is faced with more imperative issues, one of them being ¿love¿ with a young woman named Ophelia. With so many inauspicious happenings taking place, Hamlet¿s continuous difficulty of hiding his true emotions beneath his skin becomes more and more easily understood. Despite the fact that Shakespeare instills a variety of clichés and somewhat predictable scenarios throughout the play, the emotion depicted through his main character, Hamlet, is what ultimately keeps readers engaged. While Hamlet is presented with so many opportunities to kill his uncle in a means of avenging his father¿s death, Hamlet¿s deep emotions are what hold him back. In one instance, Hamlet finds his guilty uncle within a church praying to God that his plans for his future follow through, rather than asking for forgiveness of the sin he had committed with the murder of his brother, the previous king. Hamlet¿s emotions are then filled with so much hatred from merely watching and listening to his uncle¿s selfish prayer that he comes very close to killing the new king. However, he then remembers the events of his father¿s death, told to him by his father¿s spirit, where in which the uncle had killed him in his sleep without giving him the chance to repent with God. Hamlet then decides to wait longer, long enough for the perfect moment when his uncle will have no chance to repent to God. The complexity and emotion of Shakespeare¿s ¿Hamlet¿ are what captivated me the most while reading. I fell in love with Shakespeare¿s use of language throughout the play, and most of all with the emotionally torn protagonist, Hamlet. Hamlet¿s character is dragged through almost every emotion known to man. Sorrow, fear, madness, and love are only a few, but all were very well represented by Hamlet¿s character. I suggest this play to anyone looking for a suspenseful yet charismatic read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2004

    Hamlet: Much Amiss in Denmark

    I don't know if I would like this play any better if it didn't have the supernatural quality to its overall meaning. We can assume that had his father's ghost not appeared to him, Hamlet would have lived a normal life as Prince and heir to the throne. But the ghost of his dead father appears to set the tragedy in motion. Realism is violated with the device of a ghost. Hamlet's goal is to avenge his father's murder. When he starts meditating about that request, he is labelled 'mad' by the family and friends that surround him. Their initial concern is to alleviate the disquiet of his mind. Hamlet expresses the play's theme in his speeches. Something unnnatural has entered his environment, upsetting the sense of personal, social, and political normality, making the play thus apocalyptic, as tragedy can be, and because of which his rational position in life is nullified. What is natural is the principle of the Good. Or, has that problem preceded Hamlet's life and times, so that Hamlet can be called another sorry example of a diseased society? 'To be or not to be': in other words, why continue living if people will not think and behave sanely and rightly? Hamlet turns to philosophizing because of what has happened. After expressing his dissatisfaction, the friends and family who previously had wanted to help him have resolved to kill him. For they are content with the ways of the world and they do not need Hamlet inducing guilt in them. On the other hand, Hamlet still has to get around to the business of killing Claudius, the King, as he was bidden to do. The tragedy lies in the fact that Hamlet stops living as a man integrated within the Denmark society he was born into. And, in terms of fulfilling the theme's requirements, he does kill Claudius in the last scene. The King sends Hamlet to England to let someone kill him there. But because of a mishap on the ship, Hamlet sends for Horatio to come to bail him out. He will return to Denmark. As a fitting correlate to this tragic plot, Ophelia, who is Hamlet's woman, eventually goes mad and commits suicide. If the environment were functioning well, Hamlet and Ophelia could be married and live happily together. Instead Hamlet shuns her. It is a fascinating irony that Hamlet declares in the abstract that he does love Ophelia. However, there is no reason to love Hamlet because the natural course of human existence has been overturned by the present king's foul murder. A sick world is useless, and so is Hamlet's love for a woman, or for anything else, for that matter. Hamlet, moreover, is fully aware of his divine purpose. Conversely, he cannot handle his life as a prince anymore. Laertes, Polonius' son, after returning from France, wants to kill Hamlet because he murdered his father. The king and Laertes devise a specific plan, with a contingency plan, to kill Hamlet when they see him upon return. Osric, a courtier, delivers the news of the suggested duel to Hamlet. Hamlet is game and accepts the challenge, which is couched as a wager. At the end, Horatio, like a true friend, is by Hamlet's side to offer moral support and to tell the tale of noble Hamlet's 'woe and wonder.' The duel takes place rather quickly. Hamlet apologizes to Laertes that his madness was a force external to him, incited by unforeseen circumstances, and, therefore, being a good man, he was not truly responsible for Ophelia's and Polonius' deaths. Laertes responds that he is not listening to his self-proclaimed judgments. They fight with swords, one of which was dipped in poison, and both wind up killing each other. The Queen drinks a cup of wine that contains poison, meant for Hamlet's throat, and she dies. Hamlet also kills the king. In this elaborate death scene, the apocalyptic theme comes to fruition. A reader of 'Hamlet' has to understand from the get-go that any metaphysical framework, as the Elizabethan 'theory of corr

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2003

    Tragedy at its best

    Riddled with madness, backstabbing, and bitter love, Hamlet has been unwillingly exposed to the worst side of humanity. Everyone around him tries to hide their blemishes but it is Hamlet's gruesome job to bring light upon their dark. He is constantly harassed by inner and outer demons, and seems to be the only one noticing the fall of people around him. There are times in life when it seems that 'you are the only one' and that 'noone understands you', and so was the case with poor Hamlet.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2003

    A KNAVISH SPEECH SLEEPS IN A FOOLISH EAR....

    When I first discovered Hamlet, my only experience with Shakespeare was 'Romeo and Juliet' early in my english studies at high school. At that time, I despised it!!! But then I found first the movie, staring Kenneth Branagh and I was swept away with the passion, anger, love, hatred, and hopelessness of the script. Since then I've read the book numerous times, knowing many lines by heart. It is fantastic. Take your time when reading it and absorb as much as you can!! My opinion on Shakespeare now?? 'He was a man, take his for all in all, I shall not look upon his like again'.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2003

    The Man behind the Man

    Spectacular. This play is absolutely my favorite work of all of Shakespeares, at least out of the ones I've read. It's definitely a tragic, but I was hooked and attatched to all the characters that was in it. Horatio, although was my favorite. I highly suggest that you read this book/play. It's truly amazing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2003

    A twisted tragidy of a man gone mad.

    Hamlet is my favorite tale. Shakespeare may have droned on and one at parts in other plays but Hamlet was a marvel. Hamlet made us think of our own lives and how just at the drop of a pin we to can fall into maddnesses clutches. Hamlet began maddness as a ruse for vengence but how long did it really take for him to fall deeply into instanity. That question has been asked over and over and that's one reason you should read Hamlet. A truly magnificent tale of passion, betrayl, maddness and everything that makes us human.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2001

    Most excellent of all Shakespearean plays

    I have usually mildly enjoyed those plays I've read of Shakespeare (I have read and viewed about 5) So when I read 'Hamlet' I was expecting the same, however, I was pleasantly surprised that I found myself intensely enjoying the play, its theological and moral questions, as well as the interesting characters and their complex relationships. This is truly a masterpiece.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2000

    Hamlet by William Shakespeare

    It was a good book. I like how they go into detail about the interesting things. I also like how they have who is exiting and entering into the scene. That is what I thought was very good and you can act it out if you wanted to in a class. But the rest of my class Enjoyed the bool and they all give it 5 stars. Thank you for your time, A Reviewer

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2014

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    2

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2014

    Shatterclaw

    I'M BAAAAAAAACK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2014

    Robbie

    I see you

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2014

    Slick

    He ignores the swipes and takes him back to camp.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2014

    Bloodchain to tigerstrike

    No i rp umbreon

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2014

    Zane to viper

    " res 2 is the same as res 3"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2014

    To ash

    Idk

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2014

    Pika

    Lalalala....sooobored....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2014

    Ender

    She smiled at Wolf briefly, her eyes nervous. "Yeah. Okay Kewl Beans..." She gazed back at him with determination. "He had good reason to." She replied with a huff.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2014

    Ivy to all

    Chapter one is finished! 'Ronk' result two!

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