Customer Reviews for

Have a Little Faith: A True Story

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

59 out of 60 people found this review helpful.

It'll give you faith!

HAVE A LITTLE FAITH is REALLY a good read. Beyond the story and the characters (which in true Albom style, jump off of the page and into your heart), the message is deep. It's a book that will stay with you for quite awhile. I highlighted parts and dog-eared pages. In a...
HAVE A LITTLE FAITH is REALLY a good read. Beyond the story and the characters (which in true Albom style, jump off of the page and into your heart), the message is deep. It's a book that will stay with you for quite awhile. I highlighted parts and dog-eared pages. In a nutshell, Albom profiles two people: a rabbi who he has been asked to write a eulogy for, and an inner-city convict turned pastor. Two very different worlds, two very different religions, but one strongly shared similarity: faith. The change we see in one of the main characters in the book is something that we rarely see in this world. We only hear about the bad things in the media, but there are people that change their life everyday and this book is a testament to that change. Another book I read last week that I really think you should check out because it's a great fit for Albom fans: EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE 2.0. That book has done wonderful things for me personally.

posted by Oscar_Aguilar on October 4, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

11 out of 30 people found this review helpful.

did not like

I have loved all of Mitch Albom's books. This one dragged and dragged. I had to force myself to finish it. Kept waiting for the interesting part

posted by Jenoncrn on October 22, 2009

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  • Posted December 10, 2009

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    Right time, right book

    Nice hit out of the park. I like to call this a bedside book, because it is a great read when you are able to escape distractions and witness, through Mitch Albom, the phenomenal relationship between the rabbi and pastor. You know how to help the reader step in and be a part of their journey. Thank you! Amy Nymark

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 31, 2009

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    I Also Recommend:

    Mitch finds solid ground, and great writing, diving into his own head and heart

    Mitch Albom takes knocks from critics of various types. Sports nuts think he's too fancy, fancy folks think he's too rooted in sports mythology to be relevant.

    But he's built a giant fan base, and gathered a lot of dedicated readers, because he's able to find the heart of a story. Now honestly, sometimes in sports the heart of a story is pretty straightforward (and can be seen in the comical repetition of "We just tried to put the ball in play and we're glad to get the win") but here Mitch finds bedrock.

    The key is probably that he's not only writing about his home turf - his home town in New Jersey and his adopted town of Detroit - but that he's writing autobiographically. What could be more heartfelt than personal, long, and sometimes painful experience? The result is a tour of Mitch's own spiritual journey as seen through the lens of his relationship with two very special men.

    There's a military concept called Divide and Conquer. The idea is to break an opposing force up into smaller forces, then defeat each in detail. Writing mostly about the present day, Mitch shows how religions can keep us apart, keep us from working together, even scare us away from what has to be done. Talking about Detroit, Mitch shows that finding ways to be together instead of broken into ever-smaller forces is what keeps loneliness, heartbreak, and the "second death" of being forgotten at bay.

    It's in the service of this spirit of coming together, and staying together, that this book resonates. It not only brought me to tears, it had me up early the morning after I finished it, making a list of actions I would take to make the best of Mitch's lessons.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 18, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Mitch talks to my heart.

    We revisit Morrie a bit in this book as Mitch comes full circle back to real life with this non-fiction account of three men headng the same direct all on very different paths. A drug addict excon now Preacher, A life long Cleric Rabbii and Mitch himself interwind a story that ends in your heart and will stay for a long time. This book releases in late September put it on your shourt list. Quick Read. Life long Story.

    Dan

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 8, 2009

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    I Also Recommend:

    TRANSCENDING ALL FAITHS FOR HUMANITY

    This is a great book to start with. Has all the feel good effects and inspiring elements. I am happy and encouraged to see that this book has done well, but what happens after reading this book? Do we read this book just to feel good about life, or are we truly interested in gaining a deeper understanding of life, people and faith? Don't get me wrong, I like the book for what it is, but it does not teach me on how to break down my own prejudices and hidden biases. Our mind is a very complex place and can disguise itself very well in order for us to continue having the easy way out until there is no way out. The only book that I find truly enlightening and helpful in opening up my mind is "Gurus for Hire, Enlightenment for Sale" by Tsem Tulku Rinpoche. It does not attempt to hide or camouflage the ugliness or struggles and politics that exist in all faiths. More importantly, it goes beyond just Tibetan Buddhism. It sieves through the farce, fluff and folly to reveal the priceless truth. To gain understanding and give respect to all faiths, we must begin by tearing down our own wrong ideals and flawed habitual thinking. So much damage, death and destuction have taken place in this world in the name of religion alone. So much violence and hatred have continued because of the lack of understanding between the different faiths. Do we seriously need to perpetuate this cycle of war and chaos? And we continue to pass this down from one generation to another, like it is our prized heritage. Is this the culmination of our great human invention? If you firmly in peace and harmony, then you would start by arming yourself with the truth. The the only war you would engage in, would only lie in your mind - the complete annihilation of your wrong views. Happiness if not now, when?

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Classic Mitch Albom

    Although a return to non-fiction book, his first since Tuesdays With Morrie, Albom continues the theme of evaluating priorities while facing mortality.

    After a speech, Albom's lifelong rabi ("Reb") asks a favor, "Will you do my euology?" Unable to refuse "Reb" Albom agrees and feels the only way to do this task justice is to get to know the rabi as a man rather than the enigma from his youth. With the intent of assigning a few weeks or months to the interviews Albom finds himeself making the trek from Detroit to New Jersey for almost two years as the relationship grows.

    At the same time, Albom's path crosses that of an ex-con turned evangelical preacher in Detroit who is busy providing food and shelter to as many hard-on-their luck residents as he can out of a deteriorating building. As Albom tries to discern the man's heart before offering assistance, he makes repeated visits to the congregation. As a result Albom learns much about the heart of the preacher through the stories of the congregation.

    The book is classic Albom: simple writing, consistent themes, pause for thougtht, the influence one person can exert. One bonus in this book is that you learn a little about Albom's background, particularly his religious upbringing. Because my life is so hectic, I enjoy reading a quick book like this to put things in perspective. Not my favorite Albom book but definitely worth the read.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 9, 2010

    A Little Faith Goes a Long Way

    Have A Little Faith by Mitch Albom is a moving, true story about how the author rediscovers faith by learning about and meeting two special people: the wise, high-spirited Albert Lewis, his childhood rabbi and later friend, and Henry Covington, the selfless miracle worker who turned to God in his time of need.
    The main purpose of this non-fiction novel was to give readers an insight to how influential faith is, not to convert readers to a certain religion. I liked the way the author described the characters - it helped increase the impact of the moving events. I also liked how he split the book into seasons because it helped the reader put together the events in chronological order. I disliked the authors writing style though - the author's dialogue isn't in quotes, and the events have gaps in between and don't flow successfully from one to the next.
    The public should read Have a Little Faith because it will make you think about your own personal faith, your charity to the community, and life in general. It will change your point of view on topics like family, poverty, and death. Another non-fiction book I recommend is Two Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2010

    A skillful weaving together of cultures and themes--middle class Jewish family life and economically depressed Black urban conflict--Have a Little Faith surprises, provokes, and inspires. Leading inevitably to death, it turns continuously to joy.

    The story is short, best not reduced to precis, except to say it elaborates the fateful plea of an elderly rabbi to the author to conduct his eulogy. The time frame is anybody's guess. The circular inclusion of a young black drug offender, his trials and tribulations, spinning toward ultimate redemption and transformation, can seem disjointed. In fact, except in the ranging life of the author, they never intersect. Points are crafted with humor, tragic bleakness, and hope.
    This is the kind of book you immediately want to give away and trust the recipient to do the same. That's exactly what I did.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 26, 2010

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    I Also Recommend:

    Have a Little Faith

    I do like Mitch Albom. I've read two other books of his, The Five People You Meet in Heaven and For One More Day, and they are both so different from other books I read. Going into this one, I was expecting some serious reflection on my life.

    This book follows Albom in his interaction with two "Men of God". His childhood Rabbi who has asked him to do his eulogy, and Pastor Covington, a reformed drug dealer who is struggling to keep his decaying church afloat. Both men teach him profound things about life, love, and faith.

    This book claimed it would inspire me, and it did. It is a quick read, but it has a lot to say. Some of the writing was downright beautiful, and there are quite a few memorable quotes. My favorite was this: "The story of my recent life. I like that phrase. It makes more sense than the story of my life, because we get so many lives between birth and death. A life to be a child. A life to come of age. A life to wander, to settle, to fall in love, to parent, to test our promise, to realize our mortality- and in some lucky cases, to do something after that realization." This book was just filled with little moments that shine, and the characters are so exuberant, I wish I could meet them.

    If you ever feel the need to be spiritual, to feel better about yourself, this book will give you the opportunity.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 29, 2009

    Must read message about faith, respect, and loving others

    Have a Little Faith by Mitch Albom is a true story about understanding what faith really means. When Albom's rabbi, nicknamed Reb, asks him to give the eulogy at his funeral, Albom determines to know this Man of God better so he can do the task well. Over the course of eight years, he spends time learning about the Reb's life and faith which in turn makes him re-evaluate his own. As part of a way of giving back to his adopted hometown of Detroit, he creates a fund to help out organizations that serve the homeless and poor, but only after he checks out each group. While investigating a new shelter, he meets Pastor Henry, a man with a dark past who struggles to serve his people. The Reb teaches Albom that a life truly lived is one in service to others. Henry shows him that we cannot be judged by our past alone, and that church has nothing to do with a building. While Albom gets a little squishy in saying that all faiths lead to God, there's a powerful message here about respecting others' faith. It's an enjoyable read with something for everyone.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 4, 2009

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    I Also Recommend:

    About Mitch

    Here is an author that takes his time writing what needs to be said from his heart, and not one that pumps out books for the sake of it. One would expect that this book will be as moving and as classic as Tuesdays with Morrie, but in a different way.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2014

    Recommend

    This is a nice little feel good read. Full of useful tips and ways to handle daily life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2014

    Good book!

    Keeps you guessing what will happen next. I recommend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2013

    Heartfelt and honest

    Loved it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2013

    Wonderful story. Of course I love all of Mitch Albom's books. I

    Wonderful story. Of course I love all of Mitch Albom's books. I read this book in one sitting, I couldn't put it down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    Highly Recommended

    I have read all of Mitch Albom's books. This particular book, "Have A Little Faith" I read last summer and loved it. It speaks to the heart and was a positive for all those who think that they are destined to live a life of despair and desolation. This particular copy I had ordered for my uncle who is serving time in prison. He loved this book and has passed it along to other inmates who also found comfort and enjoyment in this story. He was so excited to tell me how much he loved the book. It not only brought him comfort but brought me comfort to know that I was able to give him a few hours of reading pleasure in an otherwise very unpleasant place. So well written and so reflective. Because of the popularity among the inmates and the inspiring stories that Mr. Albom writes I also sent my uncle "Tuesday's with Morrie" and plan to send his other books as they finish each one. I believe stories like these could help change lives for the better. I pray that Mr. Albom will continue to touch our hearts with many more stories like this one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2013

    Worth reading

    Not my favorite book of his but like all of his books, worth reading. :)

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  • Posted July 3, 2012

    As someone who also lost sight of their religion, I really enjoy

    As someone who also lost sight of their religion, I really enjoyed this book. It reminded me that I'm not the only one and that you can always go back. I also think that this book had a lot of important lessons that people never learn or always forget. Such as respecting other people's religions- we live in a world with so much hate an animosity between races and religious groups that to see Albom visiting both a synagogue and a church, and also pointing out the similarities between the Pastor he is hesitant to trust, and the Rabbi he grew up with.


    Albom skillfully tells the story of both of these men, starting near the end for his Rabbi when "The Rab" as he is called asks Albom to be the one to write his eulogy, and starting at the beginning of the Pastor's, Henry's, life. The similarities are obvious the whole way through, and they come together nicely when Albom is told that Henry is also called "The Rab".


    Henry's story was one that was truly moving. The way that he worked his way out of a lower class neighborhood into drugs and prison and again into drugs then back to prison and finally into a church as a pastor. I think Henry proved that with the right amount of inspiration, dedication and divine intervention, you could do anything. It was amazing how he would go from having thousands of dollars to not even being able to pay the electric bill for the church.


    I think one of my favorite anecdote was about The Rab and the priest. After the priest made a comment (many years ago, no time period provided just long ago) to one of the Jewish worshipers (please correct me if there is a better term) saying "The Nazi's didn't get enough of you if you ask me." How crass, and of a priest no less! A Catholic priest. So to ease tensions between the two religions the men walked arm in arm in front of the Catholic school as the children were released for the day.


    The Rab's acceptance of other religions was inspiring and I wish all the other ignorant people could have just a tenth of the tolerance that he showed in this book. Although I was expecting it, I still cried when he died and Albom included the eulogy that he wrote. This book was very moving and a nice short book for someone who doesn't have a lot of time.

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  • Posted April 9, 2012

    CHECK IT OUT

    Purchased for my wife, she has read it twice and she loved it. A MUST READ for all faiths.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2012

    Great Book

    Have a Little Faith was a book that really did show the true meaning of faith. It is not just the story of Mitch and how he got to know his rabbi. It goes through his journey to find his faith that he lost when he was young. It really shows how much people truly care about each other and how much of an impact one person can have on an entire community of people who otherwise had no hope. I highly recommend this book to people who are interested in learning some valuable lessons that you will probably not hear anywhere else.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2011

    Really enjoyed...

    I thought this book gave me several things to think about. Touching story

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