Customer Reviews for

The Heart Of The Matter

Average Rating 4.5
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2008

    Scobie Must Choose

    Graham Greene is my favorite author and this book just adds to my esteem of him. Scobie is a police officer who cannot resist saving and comforting the pitiable aspects of people and life. His wife's 'ugliness' 'more than just the physical' and his pity of that keeps him only interested in making her happy...until he is granted freedom when she decides to travel to the south of Africa with a friend. Then, he is drawn by pity to a recently married and more recently widowed survivor of a sinking ship. His feelings of love, guilt, and responsibility for both women come to a head when his wife returns. The religious inner dialogue of this novel and all of Greene's works that I've read provide insights into my life and my world that are timeless. This book was published in 1948 and it speaks to me more than fiction that I've read published this year. I recommend Greene's writing, not just this novel, because once you begin reading you can trust that he will deliver a thought-provoking and awakening piece of writing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2000

    The confusion of pity and love

    I stumbled onto Graham Greene in a roundabout way, so I failed to anticipate his stature as an Important Novelist; I thought he was a man who wrote books that were turned into excellent films, and then I read a short story by him called 'The Basement Room' that happened to be posted online. What a revelation. The previous reviewer griped about the religiosity of this book, but novels as complex and careful about their characters as this one--and Greene is one of the most acid and assiduous chroniclers of the indecisions of the heart as any I have encountered--are not so easily pigeonholed into decisions about morality. His Major Scobie is torn between conflicting senses of duty--to his church, and to his two women--and in the end it is uncertain after all whether he was a weak man or a strong man, and whether he was a good man or bad. The dialogues are crisp and exact; characters revolve in their own constricting passions; and the colonial life is drawn unsentimentally and candidly. Greene is a master craftsman, and his moralizations evolve from character; not, I believe, vice versa.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2000

    I NEED A PRIEST!

    After reading three other works by Greene I have come to the conclusion that his works belong under the category religious fiction. In this novel, once again the main action is driven by questions of faith. Scobie, a police officer in Africa during WWII, finds himself dangling between adultery and faith, corruption and justice, punishment and understanding. Two thirds of the book is excellent but Greene seems to use the loss of faith to tidy up the ends of his books because he can see no other way for characters to get out of their situations unless they fall prostrate before the Roman Catholic Church. While the characterization is good most of the novel, they turn into caricatures by the end and lose their identity. This book is very similar to his other novel, The End of the Affair, and is similarly disappointing. I am beginning to agree with some other critics that maybe Greene will not be as important as a novelist in the future and will be seen as merely average or mediocre in generations to come.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2000

    Excellent

    Probably one of the best written English novels I have ever read. The fall of a man's soul, debated in a destructive conflict between ancient principles and cultural restraints, and discovered needs and emotions. As a background, a back-door view of the 'glories' of colonization: a little hell for expatriots and Africans alike. Don't expect a lot of suspense, but a short, keen, immensely introspective search for truth and human dignity.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1