Customer Reviews for

Holy Blood, Holy Grail

Average Rating 3.5
( 98 )
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(38)

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(12)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

The original Da Vinci Code!

The amount of meticulous research that went into crafting Holy Blood, Holy Grail is simply breath-taking. This book uses a wealth of historical documents and ancient evidence to support its controversial theories on the Holy Grail and Mary Magdalene and I highly recomme...
The amount of meticulous research that went into crafting Holy Blood, Holy Grail is simply breath-taking. This book uses a wealth of historical documents and ancient evidence to support its controversial theories on the Holy Grail and Mary Magdalene and I highly recommend it. Also highly recommended are two other fine Grail books, one non-fiction and the other fiction, and both are by Michael Bradley, a renowned Grail expert who served as a researcher for the Da Vinci Code movie. Bradley's Swords at Sunset is a non-fiction work that traces the Grail to North America, while his fictional novel, The Magdalene Mandala is a wonderfully written thriller with a twisting plot that moves at break-neck speed. It also has well drawn characters and in the view of many is superior to the Da Vince Code. For anyone like me with a growing interest in the Grail, do yourself a favour and discover Holy Blood, Holy Grail; Swords at Sunset and The Magdalene Mandala and Love's Eclipse of the Heart. You'll be very glad you did.

posted by Maria_of_amor on August 23, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

Blood/Grail is a hard to read text book

If you are considering buying this book you probably already know what it says. The main premise of the book is not even discussed until page 313 in the paper back edition. Presented as a 450 page research paper it has little entertainment value and is not an easy rea...
If you are considering buying this book you probably already know what it says. The main premise of the book is not even discussed until page 313 in the paper back edition. Presented as a 450 page research paper it has little entertainment value and is not an easy read. There is no conclusion or proof offered to any of the theories the authors present. Holy Blood, Holy Grail may provoke thought but it is not worth the effort that it takes to read. You can make your own judgment on the content, if you can force yourself to finish reading the text.

posted by Anonymous on April 22, 2005

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  • Posted January 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Entertaining, Interesting, but Spins Wildly Out of Control

    The premise is simple enough: a group of young researchers out to solve the mystery of a mythical treasure discovered by a parish priest about 100 years earlier. Like many folk legends, the tale had a grain of truth, but was ridden with endless interpretations, fantastic theories, and conspiratorial conclusions: that certain statuary and structures had double-meanings, that this treasure, whatever it was, was used to blackmail the Vatican, which, in turn, colluded in keeping the whole story under wraps. As with many rumours, it is difficult to know how these things get started and how it will all end.<BR/><BR/>While the authors' premise and subsequent quest is interesting and entertaining, the last 1/3 of the book spins widely out of control as the authors seem bent on explaining everything and painting every blank area of the canvas regardless of what color, texture, or style they employ. Thus, research into this mystery treasure ends in theories about how Jesus may have survived crucifixion. The book shows us how it got there, but one is left to wonder why it is necessary to go there. The authors claim to be seeking a simple explanation in the beginning, but end up with anything but as they strain to make everything fit.<BR/><BR/>This book is entertaining and interesting - definitely not boring! It is important to approach this book with a critical eye. Yes, I agree one must come to one's own conclusions, and I admit there are some things (coincidences if you will) that continue to perplex me. Nevertheless, when attempting to solve such "puzzles", one must not forget that some mysteries are man-made (and thus may have been placed before you for no other reason than to confound you), while others are divine (and thus unsolvable). <BR/><BR/>Somewhere in between lies the appeal of this book and others like it: whether fiction or non-fiction. There are people who cannot fathom chaos in the midst of the divine, so they rely instead on conspiracy theories of world domination. There are still others who long for a king to set things right... a royal and holy blood line that has been so important to our history up until now. Our own enlightenment leaves room for rationality only, thus denying the divine revelation potential in us all. Therefore, there is no such thing as an accident, or that our own reason can lead us down an absurd path.<BR/><BR/>Please keep this in mind while reading this book. Yes, everything has a purpose, but that purpose cannot always be deduced by human effort. For some context and a foil to the ideas presented in this book, I recommend the works below, particularly "Circular Ruins" by Borges found in the "Labyrinths" collection.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2007

    Wow...Bias is Ridiculous

    This book reads like a text often times but if this kind of material interests you, then you will like the reading. Keep in mind that folks come on here to spout their beliefs about faith and Christianity, not the work itself. Like any other research, your bias will often lead your approach to the research and your conclusions. Thus, take each bit of information with a grain of salt. Many people won't accept other truths if it is shot in the face of what they believe. Thus, even if a small minority accepts the research, that alone is not enough to discredit its merits or prove a lack there of.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2007

    difficult

    There are interesting parts, but reading is difficult.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2004

    Bits are interesting

    I enjoyed this book, especially the parts about the Cathars & Templars; but unfortunately the premise is mostly based on the validity of the Priory of Sion, created by Pierre Plantard in 1954, a bit of a crackpot, who in 1993 confirmed it was all a hoax. A great parody of that book is Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco; which is an amusing oddessy into legendary esoterica, but emphasises the folly of making too many connections to unrelated things.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2003

    interesting if not taken too seriously

    As a reviewer above, I also read this book after reading the DaVinci Code. It only takes one about 50 pages to determine that this book is highly speculative and lacks the concrete sources for anything other than a hypothetical discussion. But I dont think that is a reason to put it down. I found the hypothesis very interesting, consider it at least possible,and even if every word is true, I am happy to report that it in no way diminished my Christian religious beliefs. I thought the author's last chapter summed up the work for exactly what it was and why Christians should not be threatened..and most wouldnt be if they read this book. That said, do yourself a favor..save yourself a lot of boring background reading. Start the book at Part 3..or the chapter immediately prior 'Lost Tribe'. You will recieive 95% of the satisfaction of the book if you just read from here on.And remember, this is not, and is not represented as, factual history..so enjoy

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2000

    Gripping Story - Flawed Research

    Summary: Baigent completed an interesting review of Europe's Royal Bloodlines (Merovingian). His writing style makes the subject come to life and appear to be accurate. However, his ultimate hypothesis rests on very weak and inaccurate biblical quotes demonstrating a cursory research and knowledge of the bible. This issue renders his final hypothesis highly doubtful and his base genealogical research of the Merovingian bloodlines fully under question. Recommendation: I would recommend Baigent's book as interesting and thought provoking reading, while encouraging self-research and skepticism by the reader. While I found Baigent's book useful in understanding what family the anti-Christ derives from (that is, the lineage of the serpent/dragon that dwells in the 'sea'), the average person can be deceived into believing biased suppositions and allegations lacking appropriate research. Overall, it seems as if Baigent is a dupe who has been supported to spout whatever stories the Merovingians need to support their own questionable objectives. Review: Although, highly offensive to Christians, the book can be relevant to biblically knowledgeable people IF his genealogical research of the royal families from 400 BC forward is accurate. The bizarre myth of the origination of the Merovingians (a pregnant woman being re-impregnated by a serpent/dragon while swimming in the ocean) can be re-interpreted from the bible and its symbolism found in the books of Genesis (Gen 3 - the Serpent) and Revelation (Rev 12 - the dragon). This is the myth that the Merovingian Dynasty relies on in order to re-acquire the throne of Europe leads Christian's to interpret the Merovingians to be the ancestors of the still prophetic world leader (commonly known as the anti-Christ). Further, Baigent touts that this royal family heir should be able to solve the religious problems and bring together the Jews, Christians, Moslems - another Christian prophesy specifically regarding the anti-Christ. Examples of Feeble Research: 1 Re-interpretation of Catholic Church History Baigent seems to enjoy re-interpreting the Catholic Church's actions into supporting the tenants of the Merovingian Blood line. But, offers no proof. Numerous times Baigent notes that the Catholic Church 'backs' down when 'presented' with the Prior de Sion 'secret information. However, Baigent never confirms the information presented to the Church, and never provides supporting material to explain the Church's actions and decisions. His only explanation is theory based on conjecture based on assumption based on supposition. The Catholic Church may have many reasons to (correctly, or incorrectly) to make a decision on. The least of the factors affecting the Church's decisions would be information that is not demonstrable, not confirmable, with no sound basis to support a change in Church Doctrine and specifically supports the Church's own prophesies of the Anti-Christ. This feeble research weakens 'Baigent's' base genealogical research. NOTE: This review is not to be interpreted as a defense of the Catholic Church - it stands in its own beliefs, blessings, blood and sins. Nor, is this review a blind defense to Christianity - it is based on valid study of the bible and its text that is verifiable to all readers. 2 Two Genealogies of Christ Baigent accounts for the differences between the 2 genealogies in Matthew and Luke as demonstrating 'mistakes' in the bible. However, the issue is readily understandable: Matthew and Luke present Christ's genealogy for different purposes, and from different perspectives. Matthew communicates the gospel from viewpoint of Jew - Christ is presented as the Lion of Tribe of Judah. For this, Matthew starts Christ's lineage with Abraham progressing through David and Solomon, then progressing through Christ's legal father, Joseph, and finishing by presenting Christ as

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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