Customer Reviews for

The House at Tyneford

Average Rating 4
( 79 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(36)

4 Star

(26)

3 Star

(11)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 79 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 4
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2013

    Wonderful!

    Wonderful!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2012

    Beautifully written

    A novel rich in detail and beautifully written. Highly recommend.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 1, 2012

    The House at Tyneford is set against the backdrop of a world pre

    The House at Tyneford is set against the backdrop of a world preparing for war. Word War II fiction is not particularly hard to find, but this novel is particularly lovely. It involves a protagonist (not strikingly beautiful), a city (not showing its best face) and a storyline which progresses casually, not at breakneck speed (a regrettable trend these days). So, this is a good, old-fashioned novel which luxuriates in thoughtful plot, fine dialogue and provocative characters.
    For all I know, Ms. Solomon anguished over every word, every punctuation mark in her narrative of 1930s Europe; but I doubt it. Her storytelling seems as natural as my grandmother charming me with tales of her native Ireland. The House at Tyneford is that kind of story. It's personalized, atmospheric, satisfying, unforgettable. I would like to see a sequel.
    FOr al

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Nice read...

    This could actually serve as an introductory novel for those hoping to one day tackle a Jane Austen or one of the Bronte sisters. Although the setting is WWII England, you almost forget it is war time...until you can not forget any longer.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 20, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    There are so many individual stories from the war andd this is a

    There are so many individual stories from the war andd this is a very good one. Ms. Solomons provides insight to many aspects of life during WWII in England--the prejudices of class, religion, and nationality. But there were also insights to how the people outside London made adjustments in their lives. And above all, this is a love story from so many dimensions. Very good book and I'm glad I took a chance on a bargain!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2012

    Enjoyable read

    This was an interesting story, a historical fiction set in Great Britain. I liked the writing style and would read more by this author.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    It is a good read and build up but very unfulfiling end.

    It is a good read and build up but very unfulfiling end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 9, 2012

    A very enjoyable read, that puts you into the life of the charac

    A very enjoyable read, that puts you into the life of the characters, the author did amazing research for the book, that builds a beautiful, elegant, but homely world that just makes you wish you were there!! An absolute must read for anyone!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2012

    Good read

    Lovely story. Easy read and great character development.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2012

    Okay read

    Nothing to write home about - but something to pass the time.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2012

    Highly Recommended World War II Historical Fiction

    This is a beautifully written historical fiction that I enjoyed reading so much. I recommend it for everyone but especially lovers of World War II history. I congratulate the author for creating such a beautiful story based on real history!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 19, 2012

    Highly Recommend - great reading

    I read this book as a selection from one of the two book clubs I am part of. I would absolutely recommend it to the book club that hasn't read it yet. I loved the characters, found them to be very real and the story was so heartbreaking for the young Elise to be torn away from her family at such a young age to escape Vienna. I found it so interesting that I had trouble putting it down. I have it on my Nook Color and had the Nook with me at all times, grocery shopping lines, waiting for water to boil when cooking, in the car when I was waiting for someone to come out that I was taking somewhere, doctors offices, etc. Natasha Solomons writes vividly, and you can picture the petals on the roses, the white caps on the waves, etc.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2012

    Good read

    I liked this book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2012

    It was an okay story with average writing but 2 thumbs down for

    It was an okay story with average writing but 2 thumbs down for the multiple "f" bomb used. Not impressed with lack of language skills in this book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 27, 2012

    Written with the feel of the Victorian novel, this book is much

    Written with the feel of the Victorian novel, this book is much more. The tone is sometimes light, sometimes romantic and sometimes tragic, but it is never overbearing. This book is about the memories of a house and the lives of the people who dwelled within it, during a time of terrible turmoil. All of them are well defined and interesting characters who come to life on the page.

    It begins in Austria, during the early years of Hitler’s onslaught. The dangers facing the Jews are just beginning. Their plight and possible escape routes are explored and painted realistically so that the menacing situation is truly experienced. The Jewish question is dealt with as a theme, and it, along with the coming war, moves the story along.

    The time is 1938 and Vienna is no longer a safe haven for Jews. Although they formerly thought of themselves as Viennese Jews, they soon discovered that they were simply Jews to the third Reich and nothing more. Humiliations and deprivations were heaped upon them, and those that could began to leave and go to other countries. Elise Landau's parents were waiting for their visa to America, her sister Margo had married and was leaving for California, but she, unable to secure a visa, was to become a servant in a manor home in England.

    Afraid and alone, unsure of her next move, she departs by train for her new life. Instead of being served and waited upon, as she was used to, she would now be the servant in Tyneford House for the Rivers family, simply because she was a Jew, unable to remain safely in her own country. She was hoping that her parents would soon be able to secure a visa for her and bring her to America too, but for now, she was to work there for a year. She was 19 and ill prepared for the future that faced her. However, she was accepted into the Rivers household, and although life was hard, it was a bit better than she expected it to be. Mr. Rivers, the master of Tyneford treated her kindly, and she soon met his very charming, eligible bachelor son, Kit. They were from different worlds, of different religions and different stations in life, but still, an easy relationship developed. There were some times, when Elise’s behavior, and the way she interacted with the other characters, left the reader wondering if it was plausible. Overall, though, the story depicted the history of events, fairly accurately.

    The class divisions, between the gentry and the servants, was very clearly defined. The upper classes were waited upon and the lower classes served. However, they looked upon their profession with respect and everyone had a place and knew and respected it. Elise must now learn hers.
    The book really illuminated the deprivation caused by war, the degradation of the normal rhythm of life, until finally, false hopes mixed with the realization that there was no escape from the reality of the war with its hardships amd suffering. The false hopes that lingered were just that, false hopes; the war would not end quickly, lives would be lost. As one group complained of its suffering, another suffered far worse. Only at the end would the true measure of the destruction be calculated.

    All of the characters were well drawn, from the highly professional Mrs. Ellsworth and proper Mr. Wrexham to the friendly and sweet Poppy and petty and haughty Diana, from Elise and her talented family, sister Margo, and parents Julian and Anna, to carefree, rambunctious Kit and his highly respected and gentlemanly father, Christopher Rivers, the squire of Tyneford; they all came alive with the authors apt descriptions.

    I loved the book. It was historic fiction, a war story and a romance novel. Every sentence was crafted carefully to provide a beautiful visual image. I walked on the sandy beach at Tyneford with Elise, I felt her trepidation on the train to England, I felt her fear for her parents’ safety as she waited in her attic room for letters, and I felt her happiness as she fell in love. I listened to the book in an audio version and found the reader to be so expressive and able to change her voice to match each character so well, that I was never confused and I felt all of their emotions, their joy, their sadness, their pain.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 19, 2012

    A Must Read

    I didnt want this book to end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 15, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Elise Landau, a 19 year-old Viennese-born young lady, is forced

    Elise Landau, a 19 year-old Viennese-born young lady, is forced to leave Austria due to the Nazi occupation. A life of luxury, with a famous writer father and opera singer mother, is transformed into a world where Elise is now a servant in an upper class English country family. Tyneford is a magical, fairy-tale land of beauty on land and the sea. Grievously homesick and missing the rest of her family, she waits for word from them while adapting to this new, difficult change in social status!

    It turns out her sister and husband have made it to America but Julian and Anna have been unable to obtain a visa to leave Austria, but Elise doesn't know that. So at least Elise can hold onto hope while learning to adapt to the life of a maidservant. The novel fluctuates between her struggles to fit into this very different life and her finding peace as she gradually explores the beautiful land around her new home. Little by little, a normalcy develops until the son of her employer, Kit Rivers. They become friends who love the land and also love an occasional bout of unacceptable behavior that is quite harmless but shocks the daylights of both Mr. Rivers and Mr. Wrexham and Mrs. Ellsworth, the two who trained her in her hob duties. Wild and fun, these actions become the tie that draws them into a deeper closeness.

    War changes everything and it's no different for Kit, Else, Mr. Rivers, the rest of the household staff, and the remaining fishers, farmers, and shepherds of Tyneford. The Germans begin to bomb Britain and the residents of Tyneford have their own secret defense force, helpless in a way to prevent the carnage of war but strong in a belief in their power to protect, a belief that ennobles all of Tyneford. Kit joins the military but quickly returns in a wounded state. Soon he will recover and leave, and from here the unbelievable happens. Relationships change in a way never anticipated by the reader and keep him or her rapidly turning pages to determine the possible, anticipated outcome.

    The House of Tyneford is a lovely book, soft and fierce in all the right places, and a tale that tells the wartime tale in so many different points of view, adding several subplots of care and love to warm the heart and elicit intrigue in all involved. Nicely done, Ms. Solomons!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 9, 2012

    Atmosphere

    It portrayed the English atmosphere and setting that I like so much. Nicely written. After the intensity of watching Downton Abbey, it was pale in comparison

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2012

    Liked it.

    Well written. Good characters. Good story. It kept me interested in the story with unexpected twists and turns. Sorry to read the last page.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2012

    I loved this book! I wanted to read really fast, to find out wh

    I loved this book! I wanted to read really fast, to find out what happened, but I made myself read slowly to savor each page!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 79 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 4