Customer Reviews for

The House of Morgan: An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance

Average Rating 4
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2001

    The Saga of a Many-faceted Powerhouse

    In ¿The House of Morgan¿, Ron Chernow gives a fascinating account of the rise to prominence of the Morgan, one of the world¿s most influential banking dynasties during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The author narrates, with much clarity, the metamorphosis of JP Morgan into a powerhouse during the Baronial Age, the taming and breakdown during the Diplomatic Age, and its comeback with a vengeance during the Casino Age. Furthermore, Chernow excels in giving life to the characters of the House of Morgan, their allies as well as foes, against the economic, political and social backdrop of their time. The reader progressively comes to the understanding of how much the US financial system is indebted to the domestic and overseas tribulations of a single bank. No other US bank has been able to emulate the power and influence that the House of Morgan has exercised under its various legal disguises since its birth in the City. The eventual repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act does not offer the guarantee that JP Morgan Chase & Co. and Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, the current incarnations of the House of Morgan, will one day be reunited again. Powerful public and private interests probably have too much to fear and lose from the rise of the Phoenix from its ashes.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2013

    Very Good Book, but Dated

    I found this book to be an excellent history of the American banking and finance industry. By using the House of Morgan as a vehicle for explaining the whole system and its evolution, it both personalized it and also made it eminently more readable by focusing on a smaller number of personalities which drove the change in the industry. I have only two issues with this book. First, I would have appreciated more treatment of J.P. Morgan himself. I realize that this book is not a biography of the man himself, but he is dead within the first quarter to a third of the book and the rest of the book follows the subsequent history of the bank after his death. My second issue with the book has nothing to do with the writing or quality of the book but rather with the date it was written. It covers the subject excellently up to the point it was published in the late 80's or early 90's. However, given the developments of the financial sector in the last 5-10 years, this is a book which is screaming for an update to address J.P. Morgan Chase's role in the financial crisis of 2008.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 10, 2012

    Ron Chernow is my favorite author. With all the financial turmo

    Ron Chernow is my favorite author. With all the financial turmoil today he really educates us about the importance of financial leadership.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 21, 2013

    Very interesting history

    Chernow does a very good job of placing the history of the House of Morgan in its historical context. He writes well and explains most in sufficient detail. For those, like me, who have limited economic knowledge the details can be overwhelming even if readable. He places the House generally in American history but concentrates on the history of banking. The strengths of the book are the detailed biographies of the leaders of the House of Morgan and similar details about how the House, or least some parts of it, adapted to the extreme changes in banking over 100 years or so.
    Must read for those who want to see how banks as institutions declined and became just another vehicle for profit. The transformation explains the tenuous nature of a global economy dominated by a search for profit rather than concentrating on the core business. Part of the core business was being a guardian of quality in all types of negotiable instruments and working with clients. With those attributes gone it is sad to see business become truly a dog-eat-dog world all done to maximize profit. Certainly makes a case for government regulation as the banks no longer do that institutionally.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1