BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

The House on Mango Street

Average Rating 3.5
( 548 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(147)

4 Star

(189)

3 Star

(105)

2 Star

(49)

1 Star

(58)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Love this book

This book was first introduced to me in college. I loved it then and I love it now. The style that Cisneros uses in this book is amazing. I would recommend this book for anyone. I also plan on teaching this book in my classroom in the coming years.

posted by KDW679 on May 23, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

12 out of 41 people found this review helpful.

Creepy for 9th grade required reading

I read this book because my it was required for my 13 year old's summer reading program. It is completely inappropriate for a child entering 9th grade. I question its value for ANY high school grade. As an adult, I found it offensive, and poorly written, The book had in...
I read this book because my it was required for my 13 year old's summer reading program. It is completely inappropriate for a child entering 9th grade. I question its value for ANY high school grade. As an adult, I found it offensive, and poorly written, The book had inappropriate subject matter, and should have come with a warning. Why any school would choose this book, when there are so many excellent books out there, is beyond my comprehension. No 13 year old child should have to read a book that discusses sexual abuse. I plan to complain to my child's school district.

posted by Mom62 on August 8, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 548 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 28
  • Posted October 9, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Good

    Had forgotten about this, until I saw someone reading this for school. Then I started remembering a little bit of this, mostly for the cover. Had read this for school and sort of remember what it was about. Sort of.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2013

    I hated this book. It was awful. I would not suggest this book t

    I hated this book. It was awful. I would not suggest this book to anyone. It didn't make sense and it was NOT written well. I would suggest books like Life of Pi or Star Girl. This was one of the worst books I've ever read and unfortunately I've read Twilight.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2013

    Terrible

    This is quite possibly one of the worst books that i have ever read. There is no linear thought in this horrible novel. I would not reccomend this book to anyone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2013

    Great book

    I have not finished this book yet but so far it is amazing! I am one of those people who are not a big fan of reading but this book is hitting the spot!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2013

    Comment

    Love her straight forward approach. Also I can relate to her experiences

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 21, 2012

    The House on Mango street, in my opinion, gave a very personal a

    The House on Mango street, in my opinion, gave a very personal and accurate depiction of what young, coming-of-age girls worried about in the 80s. Esperanza notices a lot of oppressed women, not necessarily because there were no abusive women but because in that time, domestic abuse and fighting was usually kept at home and not handled by authorities nearly as well as it is today (things like rape are also initiated by men 99% of the time). Neighbors would not report abuse that they over-heard or witnessed nearly as much because it wasn't emphasized as a big problem back then on a political scale until the 80's, and they didn't trust the authorities to help the families correctly. Not only that, but the yoke of gender roles placed upon many female's backs were considered commonplace, and first-wave feminists were still considered extremists. Not only that, but white and black first-wave feminists (the main ethnicities who participated politically in promoting feminism) were separate because of racism, and hispanics like Esperanza would have to support the black feminists because racism from whites was extended towards them also. Lots of first-wave and even some second and third-wave white feminists were and are racists and biased towards blacks and hispanic women, not extending their support of female success and equality to men to these ethnicities.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2012

    The House on Mango Street is a book that will have you intereste

    The House on Mango Street is a book that will have you interested throughout the story. The book is about a girl named Esperanza, she tells multiple stories of people she meets on Mango Street. The stories she tells are mostly stories about her experiences on Mango Street and this is the only place she would like to tell stories about. Of all the people she meets she finds a story to tell about each and every person she sees or lives around. The neighborhood of Mango Street is a Latino environment that suits Esperanza’s heritage and community. Everyone that she meets throughout Mango Street is Latinos and they all are struggling with reality as well. Esperanza’s house on Mango Street is her family’s first house they have ever owned since she was little but she always thought her first house would always be better and much bigger. She starts to get her hopes and dreams up about having a house of her own and throughout the book she will remind you constantly of her dreams. She never gives up in the book even through the worst experiences; she just writes and writes to feel free.
    There are a couple of stories in the book that caught my attention like on page 28, “Those Who Don’t.” This short story gives you a little about the neighborhood she is living in on Mango Street. She tells the readers about the people who come into our neighborhood who is scared to even have noticed they have gotten lost in the Latino part of Chicago. She states that she knows everyone very well in her neighborhood but the people who are lost don’t know anyone and they think ‘were going to attack them with shiny knives.’ She says ‘were all brown all around, we are safe’ stating that everyone in her neighborhood are the same color and don’t have to worry about any one coming into their neighborhood making them feel uncomfortable. It’s funny how she is using a vice versa statement saying that if she were to go into a neighborhood full of other nationalities she would be scared also because she would be the only brown person in their neighborhood.
    One short story I absolutely love is on page 74 and it is called ‘Four Skinny Trees.’ The reason why I love this short story is because she compares herself to the four skinny trees outside. She believe they are the only ones in the story who understand, she says this because these are trees that were planted there by the city but do not want to be there. In her comparison she believes she’s only here because she has to be here but in the back of her mind she doesn’t want to be on Mango Street at all. She compares the trees are holding onto Mango Street with their ‘ferocious roots’ and she feels the same way, she feels like she’s just been planted onto Mango Street and can’t grow or live because she’s stuck there and even if she left she will always remember Mango Street. She will always remember where she got stuck and planted and she will always have to return because that’s where she grew up and she felt as if the four skinny trees were just like her.
    The House on Mango Street is a book I really enjoyed; I can’t deny that it’s not a good book because it caught my attention all around. The book itself has a lot of culture and creativity to it, it has a bit of excitement and stories that will just make you smile. I believe this is one of my favorite books because it relates to real people in the world, I can imagine at least one or two people in the book who remind me of someone in real life. In my opinion this book is a keeper and a book to pass on to your kids when they are old enough to understand what is going on in the real world. A lot could have been taught with this one book, being a teen, poverty, sexual assault, admirers, and growing up. It teaches you the difference of people all around the world and that is one thing that is so stunning about the book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 7, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    "The House on Mango Street" Review There is nothing w

    "The House on Mango Street" Review

    There is nothing wrong with this book. It is well developed, as interesting characters and you it is a very small book (which can be good or bad). This story has very short chapters, some even a page long. But because the chapters are so short the story is always introducing you to new characters and keeping you pretty well entertained. This book is definitely not an action filled book. Actually most of the time you are just reading about friends a certain character in the book makes. This book does however show you what life is like for some people (that is if you have never lived in a very poor and Hispanic filled neighborhood). After reading this book you do feel like you learned something new about a part of peoples lives that you might not have particularly known about. If you are looking for something different to read, something maybe informative, and something that’s not exactly too exciting that I would recommend this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2012

    Definitely a good read.

    I was required to read this book in eighth grade. Some content might have been slightly inappropriate for that age; however, the writing style the author used, along with the plot of this novella, are unforgettable. I absolutely love this book. Hopefully, I will be buying my own copy soon.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2011

    You Can't Keep Up - I Don't Recommend

    I understand dissecting a book, but unless you have some kind of reader's guide to this, you'll have a difficult time. I didn't like it at all. I had to read this for 9th grade required reading and at the end, it was all pointless. The vignettes can talk about one thing and mean something totally irrelevant to the story, something extremely off-topic. I know good reads have important symbolism, but Mango Street speaks in a language known to martians. I don't care for the characters, the author gives me no reason to care for the characters, and I can't relate to any of their motives and feelings. I would give it zero stars if I could.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 29, 2010

    DON'T WASTE YOUR TIME OR MONEY!

    I read this book for my English class this term because I was required to read a text on the AP reading level. I have heard that this book is very well written and a good read. But after reading it for myself, I think otherwise. I think what Sandra Cisneros, the author, is trying to portray in this novel is the struggles of life; but more in depth, the challenges of a girl from a poor family that knows that later in life, she can be in a better economic position than where she is now. The chapters in this book are very short, and so is the book itself. This book was very hard to understand for me personally so it is a more difficult book to read. Some of the chapters in this book are not even needed in the story. They are just there and make no sense and aren't even relevant to the message that I believe the story is trying to portray. The main character in this story, named Esperanza, is a young girl from a large Latino family living in a rundown part of Chicago, Illinois. The family has moved around for some time and has now moved to Mango Street. Many different things happen on Mango Street, but it's not to Esperanza's liking. She wants a big house of her own on a hillside. Because rich people, in her vision, live on large hillsides. She reminds me of those people that grow up in horrible conditions or predicaments but defy all the odds placed against them and they succeed when everyone thought it was impossible for them. Esperanza shows incredible amounts of human potential and is most definitely going to use it to better her life. But the way Sandra Cisneros uses her words to write the story is extremely difficult to understand. One of the reasons the text is so hard to understand is because she has different parts of the story all in different places in the book so the story doesn't flow very well as far as a timeline would go. I was also reading this book with my friend that is the same age as I and he thought the same way about the book as I did. If you don't have a large amount of time for reading and you are looking for a good little book to read, I do not recommend this book to you (or anyone else). This book has no exciting parts to it at all! The ending to this book does not sum up the story very well and just like the whole story, the ending is vague and hard to understand, not to mention boring as well. Honestly, I have no idea why this book would be on the AP reading level or how this book even gets sold! This book reminds me of abstract art. Some of that style of art sells for millions of dollars even though it looks like a baby created it, or it was a mistake. The book is unorganized, slow, and difficult to comprehend and read. If you're considering reading or buying this book it would not be the wisest decision you've ever made no matter who you are.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2009

    Hispanic Connection

    The House on Mango Street I beleive was a good story if people can actually relate to what has happend in the charecters life. In the story Sandra tried talking about her past when she was a child and how she kept going from house to house and street to street. as she kept moving she really didnt make friends and if she did it was for a short time period. I think the author did a pretty good job explain the story but I think that she tried to exaggerate a little bit on what happend to her in the past so that the reader can be more excited about the book. I wouldnt really recommend this book to anybody because it really was not exciting to read it, but if i did have to recommend it to anybody i would most likeley recommend it to young kids, or somebody that can really relate to what happend in the charecters life secifically a hispanic woman.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The House On Mango Street

    "The House on Mango Street" was a book about a young girl named Esperanza who constantly moved around. "We didn't always live on Mango Street...Before that we lived on Keeler...Before Keeler it was Paulina, and before that I can't remember...But what i remember most is moving a lot". The story took place when her and her family moved too a Latino area in Chicago. This book is written as if it were the diary of Esperanza because each chapter was just a quick story of something that happend, and it never really went into that much detail. The the story is about Esperanza wanting to make a good life for herself, better than the people who lived near by her in Chicago. Esperanza's mother told her, "I could've been somebody, you know? ... Esperanza, you go to school. Study hard". She wants to listen to her mother and learn from her mistake of not finishing school and make a good life for herself. The book consists of many events that happend told threw the eyes of Esperanza. It was hard to follow because it was jumpy at times. I did not like the way that the author wrote the book. The punctuation and wording of the book made it difficult to understand at some points. It was a slow read at first but once you get past the begining its an ok book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2008

    The House on Mango Street Book Review

    This book was a requirement to read for my English class at school. In my opinion, I didn¿t like the book too much and it disappointed me thinking that it would be better. The book takes place in a small neighborhood in Chicago filled with poverty, where a young girl (Esperanza Cordero) desperately wants to leave. Esperanza had moved around a lot and Mango Street is where their latest house was located. As Esperanza continues her life on Mango Street things seem to get slightly better. She starts to make friends and finds fun things to do on Mango Street. She gets a job, goes through puberty and starts to mature a little more from her childhood. She starts to understand things a little more and eventually finds an answer to her problems.<BR/>Through out the book Esperanza numerously mentions about her plans for the future. She fantasizes about leave Mango Street and having a house of her own where there will be no one else that she has to pick up after and decorate her house the way she wants to, etc. She says that she will let people who don¿t have house stay in the attic because she knows what it feels like not to have a house. She wants a house where everything in this is hers, her porch, her pillows, her books, her things.<BR/>She also mentions how she wants to be like everyone else, like having nice clothes, a nice house, and a boyfriend. She wants to be able to do what she wants to do when she wants to do it and to be able to eat in the canteen at school with all the special kids. She is told many times that she is different then everyone else, but she still dreams about these things.<BR/>Over all I didn¿t like the book that much, but that doesn¿t mean that other people don¿t. I would recommend this book to people who want something short to read who like books about a little girls experiences living in this very run down town. It¿s the type of book where you could grab it out of your bookshelf on a rainy day with nothing else to do. I would not recommend it to people who likes books that are exciting, who can¿t wait to find out what happens, this book is not for that group of people.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 8, 2008

    The True Depth of A House on Mango Street

    The House on Mango Street proved to be a tale of a young girl striving for a better life. Esperanza, a naïve Latino girl, lives with her family in a destitute community of people who have been held back by their lack of prosperity and background. She has never felt she belonged there and believes she can be something more. As she observes the lives those around her, examples of a prolonged, miserable existence, her caring heart goes out to them, wanting more not only for herself, but for the people of Mango Street.<BR/><BR/>Throughout the novel, the writer, Sandra Cisneros, conveys the entrapment of the people around Esperanza, particularly the women. The book points out certain characters who, each with their own obstacles to overcome, represent who Esperanza could become. A woman with children and a husband who left them penniless, a teenage girl who plans to run away and get married, just to get away from that place, a young wife locked indoors because of her husband¿s fears, all of which represent a life Esperanza could someday lead.<BR/> <BR/>Her true rival, Mango Street, and all that it represents has captured the people and they now become the voice of Mango; the voice of the enemy. But Esperanza deeply desires to go away, to excel in her writing career and provide for herself. Her immaturity does not shield her from the effects of Mango Street, but rather pulls her into situations where she experiences it far more personally.<BR/><BR/>As for the novel itself, it is a quick read and fairly easy to understand. Cisneros writes in an unusual form, and the true meaning of the book is not always clearly conveyed. Upon further pondering, the deeper intentions of the book are pretty apparent. It is written in first person, Esperanza being the one speaking, and if you focus on the fact that it is the voice of a silly young girl, the writing will seem less discounted. The novel is definitely not one meant to be read then forgotten, but thought about and carefully considered for the deeper implications. <BR/><BR/>The conclusion of the novel was quite strong, with just the right amount of closure as well as curiosity about how Esperanza¿s life turns out. While the reader hopes for the best for this young girl, the sad truth is that despite her dreams and aspirations, and regardless of the sense of disconnection she feels from the place, it may become more of a part of her than she had ever intended. All that said, I would not necessarily recommend the book, but reading it might prove as a necessary stretch of the mind if placed in the right hands.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 1, 2008

    This was an okay novel, but not my favorite.

    Hello, my name is Ciara Kondol. I am reviewing the novel, ¿The House on Mango Street¿. I have to say that this novel was a very interesting piece of literature. Throughout the whole book, there were times that I was really connected to the words on the page. However, most of the time that I read the book, I had a really hard time connecting with the story of the book. I felt that the moral of the story was very powerful, and important, but the way that the book was written, made it hard for me to keep my attention on that goal. I felt that the book did not have enough relation between the characters, through dialogue, and just physical interaction. The majority of the book was just recollection of how Esparanza felt about people. I did not feel that we received enough information about things that were happening in Mango Street, but we just got bombarded with opinions on other people who lived around this young girl. <BR/> <BR/> I do give an extensive amount of credit to the author, Sandra Cisneros, however. It takes a lot of work to make a book, and she must have worked really hard, and a long time to write this piece of work. It also took a large amount of courage to write a book that was so controversial, and touched upon some tough subject, so I really applaud her, for her dedication, time, and hard work!<BR/> <BR/> As well as the low connection throughout the book, I also felt that when I reached the ending pages of the book, many questions were left out in the open, unanswered. I felt that the ending was extremely unfulfilling, and actually a little bit rushed. By the Ending, Esparanza had gained a more optimistic perspective of the street, and was going to get out of the area, but we already knew that by the beginning of the book. She was saying that over and over on multiple pages. I had many questions left unanswered by the ending of the book, such as, ¿What happens to Sally?¿, ¿How does Nenny cope with Mango Street?¿, ¿Who were the sisters?¿, ¿Does Esparanza actually fulfill her dreams?¿ I would love to know the answers to these questions by the end of the book, but they were looked over. <BR/> <BR/> Even though I had some negative feelings about the book, I also had some positive emotions, as well. I felt that the way the book was wrote, really made you stop and think, and actually take a moment to analyze the text, even though the ending fell. I also felt that the message was very powerful, that you need to follow your dreams, even if there are road blocks.<BR/> <BR/> Overall I would say that this book was okay. It would not be a piece of literature that I would recommend to someone. This book just did not fulfill my literature taste, but I still appreciate the author for writing it!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2014

    Gray

    Whup, found a better book. 'Vanity fair' all res.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2014

    Swift

    Itay.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2014

    Very dull

    I read this as ab assignment in 8tth grade. It was a boring story of a poor girl's boring life. There was very luttle plot it was all told in vignettes. There was no significant ending. It wih ended with her life continuong forward. I do not reccomend.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2014

    A really good book

    The author had a good writing style and I thought this was a great book when I read it in high school and then again in college. It shows a time when things were different and a time of growing up.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 548 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 28