Customer Reviews for

How Capitalism Saved America: The Untold History of Our Country, from the Pilgrims to the Present

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 5 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2004

    The Wealth of a Nation.

    This book is a seminal work about economics and the history of the United States of America. Its author, Thomas J. DiLorenzo, has done us all a major service in writing it--especially in a fashion so easy and fun to read. This is a first rate rendition in every way of how America became a great and wealthy nation primarily because of its adoption of a free market economic system. Although the author is an economist by training, this book is not a boring polemic about laissez-faire economics. DiLorenzo uses the history of the United States to make his points in a thoroughly enlightening and entertaining manner. He relates how capitalism saved the original settlers in both Virginia and Massachussets. He discusses the American Revolution in terms of it being a revolt against an economic system--British mercantalism--being imposed upon America from the outside at the time. This discussion is followed up with the history of the struggle between the Republicans (such as Thomas Jefferson) and the adherents (like Alexander Hamilton) of an 'American mercantalism' during the constitutional period up to the critical election of 1800. In chapter after chapter, DiLorenzo provides new perspectives on historical developments such as Clay's 'American Plan,' Lincoln's promotiion of government sponsored interal improvements, the real histroy of the Robber Barrons, the establishment of the Federal Reserve and so forth. The end result is a very readable economic treatise and a sound analysis of an important (but often neglected) aspect of American history.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2005

    Biting Off More Than Should Be Chewed

    Due to the large swath of history covered in the book (over two hundred years), How Capitalism Saved America is not nearly as hard hitting as the author¿s The Real Lincoln. Taking such broad strokes deprives Mr. DiLorenzo of his ability ¿ shown in The Real Lincoln ¿ to dig deeply into a subject and hammer home his point. Mr. DiLorenzo¿s style of writing is spirited and lively; his prose is a joy to read. To quote Florence King, his writing has ¿a good beat, you can dance to it¿. That being said, trying to cover such a large subject in a relatively small book causes it to fall flat. The book¿s best use is as a starter for someone looking to earn a deeper understanding, it can point the way towards books which cover the subject in greater depth. Mr. DiLorenzo kindly provides an excellent bibliography at the end to help the reader embark on such a task.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2004

    A must read this political 'season'

    dilorenzo returns with another great book to follow 'the real lincoln' the book is well written makes some great points and exposes fallacies and will educate on true history and capitalism.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 5 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1