Customer Reviews for

How God Changes Your Brain: Breakthrough Findings from a Leading Neuroscientist

Average Rating 4
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    PROFOUNDLY STIMULATING, CONTROVERSIAL, AND CONVINCING

    This book convinced me to devote myself to the spiritual practice of meditation, because the benefits to my health seem overwhelming. With over a 1000 references in the endnotes, the authors, who are neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania, demonstrate how contemplating on any spiritual, moral, or materialistic goal improves the health of your body and mind. The book has exercises to eliminate stress, anxiety, and depression, and meditations that they have proven to fight off age-related disorders. Perhaps the most controversial and intriguing idea they propose is that any form of contemplation of God-even if you're an atheist-causes the brain to grow new connections in areas responsible for cognition, social awareness, and emotional regulation. A spectacular book that also shows how Americans are changing their religious values and becoming more tolerant of others. Optimistic and radical. I'm giving this book as a Christmas present to all my friends and co-workers.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 16, 2010

    Excellent motivator

    I purchased this text when it came out in 2009, and read it cover-to-cover upon purchase. The book is well written, through, and inspirational/motivational for practices that are practical and beneficial for living a healthy way of life. It also provides the research that backs the benefits of long-term spiritual practices; especially meditation. These finds are in black-and-white, which is good for the skeptic towards following/cultivating a spiritual/religious tradition. There are certain elements of the book, when applied, show quick results, and others take a bit longer, but still the research shows, if one sticks with it, results will happen for one's benefit and the others. As a twenty-first century mediator, the information within the pages, intuitively are sound, and it is rewarding to read it in black-and-white--an affirmation so to speak. Presently, I am working on a second read, and finding more gems I missed from the first pass. This book is a treasure for anyone's library who values a spiritual way of life and the lasting benefits living such a life has on the brain.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 23, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    God Imagined

    In seminary (a real seminary, not the Christianist indoctrination academy that pass for seminaries) theology is often taught in context of imagination. Theology is a creative phenomena and is accessible to everyone. As such, empowering inspiration, codes of behavior, devotional impulses, and attention to conscience are inductive rather than deductive and, too often, coercive. Much of what passes for religion is no more than a projection of a person's fears and insecurities dressed in a specific language, imagery, and story.
    This book is another in a series of liberating texts. It does not liberate one from the god so much as it demonstrates that there is a specific synaptic and structural benefit to belief and that benefit can be had without putting one's attention on any object. The idea is as old as many religions if one removes symbol and culture, metaphor remains. It is not what you believe but that you believe. This book opens the door to possibilities of spiritual liberty never before made so clear. This book should be required reading for anyone brave enough to enter the spiritual quest and ready to find answers that might not agree with his or her preconceptions.
    Thank you Dr. Newberg and Mr. Waldman. Thank you for helping us understand that it is possible to have devotion, spiritual practice, and a healthy life without the confines of superstition and fear.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 25, 2012

    strongly recommend

    Very enlightening book to read. I will use this book as a reference and guide many times over. Was looking for a place to start with meditation practice and this was the right place to begin. If you are looking for a place of serenity and personal growth I recommend you read this book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2010

    Bland and Uncompelling

    I'm a grad student doing my thesis on Neurotheology and was told to read Newberg's works by my professor. So I went and bought his trilogy of nothingness: Why we Believe, Why God Won't Go Away and now this one. How many times can this guy write the same book? He put a monk in an MRI years ago and now keeps rehashing the same exact things over and over again. Not only are all three books boring and poorly written, but this alleged scientist doesn't even have the wherewithal (i.e. spine) to take a position on the matter as to whether or not he believes in a God. I give it one star as a waste of time.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2014

    This book should not be in the science section.

    Not science.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2