Customer Reviews for

How Perfect Is That

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2010

    Insipid!

    If this was an attempt to write as Carl Hiaasen, the book falls far short. Character development is next to non-existent even for the main character. Definitely not a redeemed character as proclaimed by the review.

    We were hoping the personalities would be better examined than in even previous books by the author but found this even less. Being a local writer, we were "pulling" for her but were sorely disappointed,

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2010

    How perfect is that?

    Blythe Young is recently divorced, broke, and running from the IRS. When she finds herself at Seneca House, the tenement house she lived in while at college, she turns to the only friend she knows she still has left. But although Millie Ott is still the sweet woman Blythe remembers, Blythe has changed, and Millie isn't quite as trusting of Blythe's conniving ways as she used to be.

    Blythe has come a long way since her trailer park upbringing, and she's determined to stay in the Austin society she married into, even though she no longer bears the right last name. If that means lying, cheating, and playing one socialite against the other, she's willing to do it. But her game comes to a halt at Seneca House.

    Suddenly, Blythe finds herself making visits to homeless men in the park and street teens who are desperate for direction. And in the process of helping these people, she finds herself, albeit reluctantly. Although she never quite reforms, Blythe learns to use her scheming ways to everyone's best advantage.

    In How Perfect Is That, Sarah Bird shows us the other side of high society. Blythe is a difficult woman to relate to, if you've always lived on the right side of the law, yet she's endearing in her own way. While we may not relate to her struggles to fit into the right circles, most women experience desperation at some point in their lives, and we never know what sacrifices we'd be willing to make to survive. Ultimately, Blythe faces her debt to society and attempts to repay it with some good. Now, how perfect is that?

    Reviewer: Alice Berger

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 22, 2009

    Definitely read this entertaining story!!

    Sarah Bird has very cleverly written an engaging and humorous depiction of Austin, Texas.from the homeless to the haute couture. Social climber Blythe Young has hustled her way to the top of Austin's elite society. But a nasty split from her patrician husband leaves her penniless and worst of all, a social outcast! To make matters worse, her catering company is failing and she is wanted by the IRS. With her life in a shambles, she is taken in by her old college roommate, whom she had disdained during her ascent into high society. Absolutely hilarious antics ensue when Blythe vows to regain her prominent social standing.

    Ms. Bird has brilliantly crafted a creative, witty storyline with a delectable cast of unique, complex characters. Her writing is very imaginative, descriptive and laugh-out-loud funny. Through this compelling story, Ms. Bird makes an indirect comment about Austin's high society.their lifestyles and politics. She also teaches a wonderful lesson on the value of female friendships. I thoroughly enjoyed this truly entertaining novel and I highly recommend it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Too wordy

    By "too wordy" I mean that every sentence of this book seems to be filled with way too many adjectives or cultural metaphors...so much so that I found myself having to read some of the page twice to be sure I knew who was talking or what was being discussed. Unorganized and hard to follow for sure. Honestly, I lost interest before chapter 5 and have not read the entire book. I probably won't read it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Messed up logic makes for a very entertaining story.

    This book was hilarious. I laughed almost from the first word all the way through. And while I couldn't connect with Blythe on a personal level it was entertaining to try and find reason in her messed up logic. She's been cast aside from her once glamorous life and is trying to wide a wave that has long left shore. While she can't seem to realize it, all of her problems are her fault, not her ex-husband or his "evil" mother.

    Her look on life is a bit disheartening and I can't say I want to trade places with her, however seeing what she comes up with is hilarious. From the Ruffies to the tandem recumbent bike to the "off label" spa clinic this book just kept me laughing. There are so many moments when I was thinking she's screwed now, but somehow she comes up with something.

    I know I keep mentioning how funny this book was, but I couldn't stop laughing. Even when I was talking to my bf about what was happening in the book he would chuckle. It's a great pick me up, cause if you feel like you have nothing well Blythe has even less, and she's making due (kind of). It's good chick lit and it was a pretty quick read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2008

    A hilarious riches to rags story

    'How Perfect Is That' is a guided tour to the anthrophology of high and low Austin society as a wannabe socialite takes an hysterically funny tumble from up to downstairs. It is so much fun to laugh at the arrogant, opulent lifestyles of the Bushesque world the heroine, Blythe Young, falls from. The perfect antidote to the evening news! Laughter IS the best medicine.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1