Customer Reviews for

How Should We Then Live?: The Rise and Decline of Western Thought and Culture

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2008

    Join a worldview cafe discussion forum at your nearby Barnes & Noble...

    Dr. Schaeffer's Cultural analysis of Western Civilization is a profound and worldview shaking study! It engages our postmodern society and culture, integrating the 'Great Thinkers' within the various academic disciplines such as Philosophy, Science, Theology, History, Sociology, Art, Music, Literature, and Films. A MUST READ!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 9, 2013

    Check this out

    Excellent! A Christian perspective of world history.

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  • Posted December 8, 2011

    not for the faint of mind -- a life-changer

    There are maybe 5 books that I come back to on a regular basis. This is one of them. It forever challenged me to think deeper and more intentionally. Western culture and society now make sense. The vocabulary is intense yet the warm gentle spirit of this bright mind rings clear and true.

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  • Posted March 16, 2010

    great resource for studying the philosophy of modern Western culture

    This book had long been recommended to me, so when our son Mark (now graduated from high school) studied world history in tenth grade, we combined it with a study of Western culture and philosophy using Schaeffer's material. It was much later when I got around to reading it myself, and it is one of the most enlightening books that I have ever studied. Schaeffer, who died in 1984, gives the best explanations that I have seen as to the differences between the freedom of the Western world following the introduction of Christianity and the "Dark Ages" when much of the Christian message had actually been corrupted by the Roman Catholic hierarchy through its synthesis with pagan philosophy; between the Renaissance/Enlightenment that led to license and the Reformation that led to freedom, which were going on about the same time; between the English "Bloodless" and American Revolutions, with their Biblical bases, and the French and Russian Bolshevik Revolutions, with their atheistic origins; and the difference between the origins of science in trying to search for God's order in the universe and modern science which simply eliminates the supernatural.
    Some of the specifics of the book are a little dated today, but the overall thought of its message is just as true now as it was when written, and it is a bit eerie to see how some of Schaeffer's predictions based on trends that he saw in the early 1970s have come true in our time. Here is an example from Chapter 12, "Manipulation and the New Elite" in which Schaeffer points to the development of an authoritarian state to fill the vacuum left by the loss of Christian principles. "In Walden Two Skinner's utopia was a totally conditioned society. The director, T. E. Frazier, manipulated everyone to control all the details of the society. He made the people think that they wanted what he had decided they and society itself should be." This reminds me of Barak Obama and the health care debate. Schaeffer then goes on to describe the role of the media in all this. How Should We Then Live? is not easy to read, but no study of Western Civilization is really complete without it.

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    Posted July 4, 2009

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