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How Tia Lola Came to (Visit) Stay

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Good

Its a pretty good book, even though its not the best book in the world.......

posted by Anonymous on April 4, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

How Tia Lola was Mediocore

How Tía Lola came to ¿Visit¿ Stay by Julia Alvarez is not one of my favorite novels off the Hispanic author shelf, but it was a very fun read and, in my own opinion, had some symbolism throughout as well as a connection back to the Spanish language through the array of ...
How Tía Lola came to ¿Visit¿ Stay by Julia Alvarez is not one of my favorite novels off the Hispanic author shelf, but it was a very fun read and, in my own opinion, had some symbolism throughout as well as a connection back to the Spanish language through the array of characters in Alvarez¿s novel. The novel is about a boy named Miguel whose parents have recently filed to be divorced, and his mother has invited his very colorful aunt to stay in their home. Miguel has to be the shallowest character written about in literature. His aunt is a little odd and a bit fiery and flavorful than most people, but he worries more about what his new classmates would think than staying on the side of family. Alvarez wrote, ¿This is how Tía Lola becomes top secret.¿ '28' Miguel decides to keep his aunt a secret because all his friends think she is a ghost anyway. He¿d rather be liked than actually stick by his own family, as stated. Even though he slowly admits he likes some things about his aunt, he keeps her under wraps practically the whole visit. Now, Miguel¿s mother, Mami as they call her, has a very, shall I say, more developed storyline. She is new to being a single mother just in the midst a terrible divorce, and is now living on her own with her two kids. Mami is also the one who invited Tía Lola to visit. Something interesting about her character is the narrator makes many references to `the blue bowl¿. Alvarez wrote, ¿But he keeps his mouth shut. He knows why his mother is staring at the blue bowl, and he doesn¿t want to upset her memory.¿ '2' The infamous `blue bowl¿ is a symbol of the broken relationship between Miguel¿s parents, being the bowl they spoon fed cake to each other from on their wedding day, and a symbol of Mami¿s torture that her marriage is over. Now, Miguel¿s younger sister, Juanita, seemed to be the most underdeveloped character. She offered a symbol of innocence in the novel. Juanita is very young, roughly four or five, and, as I noticed, doesn¿t really harness what is going on with her parents yet. Juanita offers some basics of the Spanish language to the novel. Juanita says, ¿`Tía is the word for aunt in Spanish, right, Mami?¿¿ '1' And finally, for the main roles throughout the novel, is Tía Lola, the family¿s colorful aunt from the Dominican Republic. She is very loud, boisterous, and can only speak Spanish which offers more than just the basics, like Juanita¿s character offers. I believe Tía Lola symbolizes the idea of prejudice in America. Especially with Miguel keeping her top secret from his friends he is rejecting something different just because it is different. I also believe Tía Lola represents some of the problems in America vs. Cultural Changes because Miguel most likely feels that Tía Lola could mess up his Latin-American lifestyle, like a large majority of bigoted Americans feel that letting people jump our borders is going to ruin our country. Tía Lola has to be my favorite character over all because I, personally, would love a wacky and crazy aunt like her. Another thing I loved about this novel is the Spanish integration into the English text like using simple Spanish words as way to show younger readers that other languages are out there other than just English. Overall, I give this novel three stars as a book and two thumbs up if they ever made it a movie. It is good for rainy day fun or for some analysis into what each little piece means.

posted by Anonymous on April 15, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2012

    Good

    Its a pretty good book, even though its not the best book in the world.......

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 1, 2011

    Review

    Great book

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 19, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great book

    Great short read, fun for this Dominicana to read. Situations are a little too easy to predict and cliche (the curmudgeon who finds his heart, etc.) but it was still fun and great to introduce my son to some of his Dominican culture and heritage. Great for ages 10+, although some of the spanish might trip up younger kids.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2010

    What i think?

    This is a good book. Anyone in the age range of 9 and 12 should read this book. I recommend this book to everyone who reads it, trust me you will see what i'm talking about. This book is very interesting to the kids minds!!!! i know because i am one !!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2008

    How Tia Lola was Mediocore

    How Tía Lola came to ¿Visit¿ Stay by Julia Alvarez is not one of my favorite novels off the Hispanic author shelf, but it was a very fun read and, in my own opinion, had some symbolism throughout as well as a connection back to the Spanish language through the array of characters in Alvarez¿s novel. The novel is about a boy named Miguel whose parents have recently filed to be divorced, and his mother has invited his very colorful aunt to stay in their home. Miguel has to be the shallowest character written about in literature. His aunt is a little odd and a bit fiery and flavorful than most people, but he worries more about what his new classmates would think than staying on the side of family. Alvarez wrote, ¿This is how Tía Lola becomes top secret.¿ '28' Miguel decides to keep his aunt a secret because all his friends think she is a ghost anyway. He¿d rather be liked than actually stick by his own family, as stated. Even though he slowly admits he likes some things about his aunt, he keeps her under wraps practically the whole visit. Now, Miguel¿s mother, Mami as they call her, has a very, shall I say, more developed storyline. She is new to being a single mother just in the midst a terrible divorce, and is now living on her own with her two kids. Mami is also the one who invited Tía Lola to visit. Something interesting about her character is the narrator makes many references to `the blue bowl¿. Alvarez wrote, ¿But he keeps his mouth shut. He knows why his mother is staring at the blue bowl, and he doesn¿t want to upset her memory.¿ '2' The infamous `blue bowl¿ is a symbol of the broken relationship between Miguel¿s parents, being the bowl they spoon fed cake to each other from on their wedding day, and a symbol of Mami¿s torture that her marriage is over. Now, Miguel¿s younger sister, Juanita, seemed to be the most underdeveloped character. She offered a symbol of innocence in the novel. Juanita is very young, roughly four or five, and, as I noticed, doesn¿t really harness what is going on with her parents yet. Juanita offers some basics of the Spanish language to the novel. Juanita says, ¿`Tía is the word for aunt in Spanish, right, Mami?¿¿ '1' And finally, for the main roles throughout the novel, is Tía Lola, the family¿s colorful aunt from the Dominican Republic. She is very loud, boisterous, and can only speak Spanish which offers more than just the basics, like Juanita¿s character offers. I believe Tía Lola symbolizes the idea of prejudice in America. Especially with Miguel keeping her top secret from his friends he is rejecting something different just because it is different. I also believe Tía Lola represents some of the problems in America vs. Cultural Changes because Miguel most likely feels that Tía Lola could mess up his Latin-American lifestyle, like a large majority of bigoted Americans feel that letting people jump our borders is going to ruin our country. Tía Lola has to be my favorite character over all because I, personally, would love a wacky and crazy aunt like her. Another thing I loved about this novel is the Spanish integration into the English text like using simple Spanish words as way to show younger readers that other languages are out there other than just English. Overall, I give this novel three stars as a book and two thumbs up if they ever made it a movie. It is good for rainy day fun or for some analysis into what each little piece means.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2012

    Read

    I read this in fourth grade it is pretty good. Now i am in seventh and still like it

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2012

    !!

    Julia alverez is my nieghbor!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2012

    Hey

    Have you seen the cover!!!!!!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 9, 2011

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    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2003

    Tia Lola is the Bomb!

    I loved this book, it made me not want to sleep at night. The way the author expressed the way the characters were feeling was great. This was the first time that i read a book by this author but, i can tell you that i will be reading a another one her. I suggest that chioldren and adults should read it to.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2013

    Tia lola

    This was a very good book that had my full attention.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2012

    Love

    I need to read it for battle of th book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 14, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Cute.....

    I read his to be able to discuss with my daughter. I liked it but not loved it! Could of been a lttle better but kept me reading.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2010

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