Customer Reviews for

How to Teach Physics to Your Dog

Average Rating 4
( 30 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2010

    More Books Should Be Wrtten for Our Dogs

    Non mathematical treatments of quantum mechanics are exceedingly difficult to to well. Most talk about the subject in vague ways that, unfortunately, misrepresent some of its concepts and nearly all make it difficult to create a mental framework of how individual aspects fit together and lead from one concept to another.

    Wonderfully, this book does not. The choice of key concepts to present and their order of presentation are superb. The first chapter sets the background with a good presentation of the particle-wave duality. This is important as it is key to understanding of later phenomena and why the theory emerges in the way it does. The order of topics provides needed stepping stones to grasp the theory.

    Special credit should be given for the list of "Central Principles of Quantum Mechanics." Listing them and presenting them in detail provides the groundwork for later topics, what's important about those topics and where and how do they fit together.

    The author has unusally good (and lucid) presentations on the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, Schrodinger's 'Dog', interpretations of quantum mechanics, entanglement and teleportation. His grounding key concepts and conclusions by presenting empirical evidence from key experiments provides anchors for understanding the subject.

    I applaud the chapter on misuses of quantum mechanics.

    Now, about this dog business ... the author's approach of teaching his dog, Emmy, is both astute and excellently done. This device is charming and disarming in that it takes the edge off the weight of the intellectual content while introducing some breathing room in the presentation. It allows the author to pose (and answer) natural questions that arise from the material and to restate explanations and insights in a natural way that doesn't make the reader feel inundated.

    The author, like a good author should, presents a well done glossary of terms and concepts. There is a very good further reading list. The understanding of these books will be greatly facilitated by reading the author's book first.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    Srart here to learn about quanru The place to start on this amazing topic

    I have read severl books on advanced physic. THIS IS THE BEST I HAVE READ.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Light-hearted introduction to quantum mechanics

    There is perhaps no area of Physics that has garnered as much fascination as quantum mechanics, save perhaps the theory of relativity. Yet in a sense the weirdness associated with quantum mechanics is even more profound than that associated with relativity. Relativity deals with physics of very fast objects, and even though it challenges our normal way of thinking, it still preserves some of the basic intuitions of what does it mean to be a physical object, how we measure properties of those objects, and what those objects can and cannot do. Quantum mechanics, on the other hand, puts all those basic notion to a test. We are forced to reconsider even our basic understanding of what reality is. There have been many popular accounts of Quantum Mechanics over the years, and this book is yet another attempt of bringing this arcane field to the general readership. So despite what the title may say, this is not a book about Physics in general, but just about quantum mechanics. The dog from the title is author's German shepherd, and she is used as a stand-in for all the naïve, "Newtonian" ways of thinking about the world. Each chapter in the book covers a different aspect of quantum theory, and all the discussions are motivated in a light-hearted way by author's "dialogues" with his dog. These "dialogues" are meant to provide some comic relief from the otherwise technical subject matter. As such they work fine, although I am not the biggest fan of author's attempts at humor. The explanations provided in the book are actually very good - they are very well written, accessible to the general audience, and absolutely conceptually correct. This last point should not be taken for granted, as I have seen many attempts at making Physics accessible to the general audience that don't actually do justice to the actual Physics. One thing that I in particular like about this book is that it mentions several more recent experiments that have shed important light at the foundational aspects of quantum mechanics. In that respect this popular treatment is as up-to-date as they come. As a college Physics professor myself, I appreciate all the effort that the author has put into making this material accessible. As far as introductory, non-technical books on quantum mechanics go, this one clearly hits its targeted audience.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 30, 2011

    If you want to learn more about physics, this is for you!

    I just graduated from high school, and am going to college next year to double major in mathematics and physics. Lately, I have been debating on dropping my physics major, because I haven't been able to identify a modern use for physics that I would actually be able to do work with in a career. This book, however, told me something extremely different. Not only did it broaden my knowledge of physics, it showed me all the practical uses for quantum physics. I now know that I want to major in physics, without a doubt. I am not going to deny it; I felt extremely nerdy for reading this book over my summer vacation, but I couldn't put the thing down. I think I was practically drooling over the physics in it, and I definitely want to do more reading on the subject. The conversations with Emmy, Chad Orzel's dog, were all charming and really helped the book in making the difficult concepts understandable. I loved all of the "critter" references and I liked that microscopic ideas were turned into macroscopic examples. I would highly suggest this book for anyone who is remotely interested in physics. I will be reading it again very soon!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 7, 2010

    Fantastic read!

    I'll keep this brief. I've been reading physics/astrophysics, quantum theory books and the like for a few years now and this one was truly a fresh approach. I would suggest than anyone interested in learning more about quantum theory read this book, as it comes at you in a way that is playful yet in-depth. I would tell anyone to sample the book in the very least however I am very happy to have it in my collection.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 20, 2010

    Yesterday I didn't even know how to spell it, now I are one...

    This is really a great book, it provides easy to understand descriptions of the various and peculiar ways the phenomenal world manifests at the level of particle physics. Although I was attracted to the book by its funny name, I found the aside dialogs with his dog a little unnecessary and even distracting (maybe condescending). I recommend the book to those wanting to appreciate quantum physics without the somewhat brain-twisting approach often provided many authors. Mr. Orzel demonstrates a significant amount of empathy with those who wish to understand but lack formal training, but he should keep his great love for his dog to himself.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Hooray For Physics and Dogs

    I liked How to Teach Physics to Your Dog because I love dogs and I learned much information about physics. Chad Orzel explains physics in such a way that general readers can understand it and he makes physics entertaining. I loved the chapter about Schrodinger's Dog. This chapter is a take off of Schrodinger's Cat, which is a classic physics thought experiment. I also liked leaning that Schrodinger thought up this experiment while on a ski holiday with many women. He was married. This proves that scientists are sexual beings too. It was interesting to learn why Ozel belives that dogs can understand physics easier than humans. This book gave me an appreciation of physics that I didn't have before reading this book. I highly recommend that both humans and dogs read this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2