BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

Hunger (Riders of the Apocalypse Series)

Average Rating 4
( 38 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Reviewed by LadyJay for Teens Read Too

Lisa can never escape the thin voice. It screeches and tears at her - telling her how fat she is; counting the calories in one chocolate chip cookie; calculating the number of minutes on the exercise bike. No matter how thin she is, it's never enough. Lisa's anorexia sp...
Lisa can never escape the thin voice. It screeches and tears at her - telling her how fat she is; counting the calories in one chocolate chip cookie; calculating the number of minutes on the exercise bike. No matter how thin she is, it's never enough. Lisa's anorexia spirals out of control; she swallows a handful of her mother's antidepressants. That's when Death comes for her. He doesn't want her soul - not just yet. Instead, he bequeaths a gift. Lisa will now embody one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse - she will become Famine. Midnight, her black steed, whisks her away to lands that are ravaged by hunger. She is witness to great suffering and pain. Through all of this, Lisa discovers that possessing Famine can do incredible harm as well as good. She learns how to sustain life, and in return, that inspires her own will to live. I was amazed by the premise of HUNGER. What a creative and thought-provoking way of looking at eating disorders. Kessler handles the subject matter with incredible care, without preaching or lecturing to the reader. I believe that this novel will truly resonate with some teens. I know it did with me.

posted by TeensReadToo on November 7, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Hunger by Jackie Morse Kessler Review

The best way I can describe this book is by saying that this was a very difficult and tough read. I enjoyed the spin Jackie Morse Kessler used in Hunger, giving Lisa the job responsibilities of Famine, but underneath this, no reader will be able to forget that there is...
The best way I can describe this book is by saying that this was a very difficult and tough read. I enjoyed the spin Jackie Morse Kessler used in Hunger, giving Lisa the job responsibilities of Famine, but underneath this, no reader will be able to forget that there is a very serious issue at stake. Kessler allowed readers to be passengers along for the ride during Lisa's struggle with her eating disorder and the consequences that have been the result of her actions.

I'm not sure what I was expecting from this novel, but I enjoyed reading it (or at least as much as one can) with a topic as heartbreaking as this one. I found myself feeling extremely naive and ignorant when presented with some of the information presented to me in Hunger. I know this is a work of fiction, but Kessler does say in her acknowledgments at the end of the book that although this is a work of fiction, she makes it clear that this situation and many like it are not make believe. Many people out there suffer from these diseases and so many need help and assistance from people they can trust. I will say that as informative as this was for me, there was one point about half-way through that after reading I was not sure I'd be able to make it to the end. It was an incredibly vivid and emotional scene and it was devastating to witness/read. So I took a break but then decided that I couldn't let myself put this book aside forever, so I kept reading.

I think Kessler has a wonderful writing technique and is doing a great and very brave thing by not only writing this novel and putting it out there, but for trying to reach people through Hunger, in order to help educate everyone with this story. There is help out there for those individuals with eating disorders and hopefully they'll be able to see there is light at the end of the tunnel, and help for those who want and need it. For people like me, I was humbled after reading this book because of my ignorance on these issues and problems, and I'm thankful to have had the chance to read Kessler's work. I look forward to reading more of her work and can only hope that her voice reaches far and wide with Hunger.

posted by Burg on June 28, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Posted November 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by LadyJay for Teens Read Too

    Lisa can never escape the thin voice. It screeches and tears at her - telling her how fat she is; counting the calories in one chocolate chip cookie; calculating the number of minutes on the exercise bike. No matter how thin she is, it's never enough. Lisa's anorexia spirals out of control; she swallows a handful of her mother's antidepressants. That's when Death comes for her. He doesn't want her soul - not just yet. Instead, he bequeaths a gift. Lisa will now embody one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse - she will become Famine. Midnight, her black steed, whisks her away to lands that are ravaged by hunger. She is witness to great suffering and pain. Through all of this, Lisa discovers that possessing Famine can do incredible harm as well as good. She learns how to sustain life, and in return, that inspires her own will to live. I was amazed by the premise of HUNGER. What a creative and thought-provoking way of looking at eating disorders. Kessler handles the subject matter with incredible care, without preaching or lecturing to the reader. I believe that this novel will truly resonate with some teens. I know it did with me.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 13, 2010

    How Hungry are you?

    I had never read a book about the four horsemen before, so I was really excited to start this one. It's a fresh face in the paranormal monster world (at least for me), and I'm always on the look-out for something new. I really liked the premise of it. I think Death was definitely my favorite horsemen. He was funny and really put a fun spin on the concept of death.

    I think it was great that Jackie Kessler managed to take a fun paranormal read and center it around the very important issue of eating disorders. I think it's so important that teens find books that they can relate to, that help them through tough situations in their lives. Eating Disorders are everywhere these days, and yet you still don't hear people talking about them much.

    I liked Lisabeth's character. I found her hard to relate to sometimes, but I think that was because she was struggling with herself so much in the book. She had a hard time relating to herself. The eating disorder was eating her.

    Overall, this was a great new addition to the YA world and the paranormal world and I'm really looking forward to reading Rage, the next Horseman book!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Different

    http://scholarberry.blogspot.com/

    "But the Thin voice saved her.
    Hershey's Kisses, it whispered. Twenty-five calories each."

    Jackie Morse Kessler's debut novel is spectacular.

    Lisabeth Lewis, the main character of Hunger has a boyfriend. Maybe it's something about being a couple; all of a sudden you care more about other people's opinions on appearance.

    Lisa loved food--she used to go with James (her current boyfriend) and Suzanne (her ex-best friend) into Joe's Diner and eat normally like everybody else.

    Then the Thin voice appeared, telling her that she's fat fat fat and that she needs to lose weight. As if her perfect and insanely critical mother hasn't stop complaining yet.

    When she lost 10 pounds just like her mother wished, her mom complained about her skin complexion or et cetera.

    Then she had a dream. Maybe a nightmare, because the sexy Death came for her. She was appointed to be Famine, because Lisa tried to kill herself. Death was merciful. Death was kind. Death was sexy.

    She was anorexic herself, and she's trying to help people to counter famine. She encountered War, who really wants to get rid of her. But despite the fear she has for War, her betraying friends who doesn't understand, her strange boyfriend and her uncaring parents, she got to ride Midnight, her black horse.

    Hunger is about life and death, supporting family and friends, finding yourself and losing yourself.

    What I like about the book: It was funny and sophisticated, realistic and also different. Lisa's mind was filled with conflict, hence, interesting. Death's characteristic was also hilarious, switching back and forth from old English to rocker style. :D I definitely enjoy this book.

    What I dislike about the book: The beginning was a bit slow and dragged to me, but I kept reading and I loved it!

    http://scholarberry.blogspot.com/

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 28, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Hunger by Jackie Morse Kessler Review

    The best way I can describe this book is by saying that this was a very difficult and tough read. I enjoyed the spin Jackie Morse Kessler used in Hunger, giving Lisa the job responsibilities of Famine, but underneath this, no reader will be able to forget that there is a very serious issue at stake. Kessler allowed readers to be passengers along for the ride during Lisa's struggle with her eating disorder and the consequences that have been the result of her actions.

    I'm not sure what I was expecting from this novel, but I enjoyed reading it (or at least as much as one can) with a topic as heartbreaking as this one. I found myself feeling extremely naive and ignorant when presented with some of the information presented to me in Hunger. I know this is a work of fiction, but Kessler does say in her acknowledgments at the end of the book that although this is a work of fiction, she makes it clear that this situation and many like it are not make believe. Many people out there suffer from these diseases and so many need help and assistance from people they can trust. I will say that as informative as this was for me, there was one point about half-way through that after reading I was not sure I'd be able to make it to the end. It was an incredibly vivid and emotional scene and it was devastating to witness/read. So I took a break but then decided that I couldn't let myself put this book aside forever, so I kept reading.

    I think Kessler has a wonderful writing technique and is doing a great and very brave thing by not only writing this novel and putting it out there, but for trying to reach people through Hunger, in order to help educate everyone with this story. There is help out there for those individuals with eating disorders and hopefully they'll be able to see there is light at the end of the tunnel, and help for those who want and need it. For people like me, I was humbled after reading this book because of my ignorance on these issues and problems, and I'm thankful to have had the chance to read Kessler's work. I look forward to reading more of her work and can only hope that her voice reaches far and wide with Hunger.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 3, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Loved it!

    really hard-sad-happy-tear-filled story...
    I started this book not so sure if I would be able to enjoy it let alone finish it. But ended up so captured in the story of Lisa that I couldn't decide wether to laugh or be mad at her.
    She struggles definitely completely fights with herself to be THIN!!ugh!!
    the way Kessler put this story into words left me wondering if there could be an answer to all of our problems that could be that simple and yet because of its simpleness we don't see it 'cause we're always thinking that the answer to all of our problems have to be BY FACT difficult and hard to reach.
    So seeing this girl fighting with anorexia thinking that it's her againts the world, that she alone has the BIGGEST problem of the universe, realize that when she is neglecting herself to EAT to be HEALTHY there are people all around the world dying for that pice of lettuce she just threw up...
    A really down-to-earth yet magic-filled story of anorexia and the hardships that it brings when settled on a person's daily life.
    Kessler not just approaches anorexia but hunger at the same time...completely filling and giving meaning to the tittle of the book!!
    A MOST READ IF YOU ARE NOT OUT OF YOUR MIND!
    5/5

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 28, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Read this!

    "Thou art famine, yo." With a line like that who could not like this book? This book was awesome. Had me hooked from the very beginning. The only things that disappointed me was the fact the it was short. I wished the story had a little bit more for me to bite on. But bite me it did!

    Lisa is a teenage girl suffering from anorexia. She struggles with a voice in her head all the time telling her she is fat, weak and ugly. Lisa is on the verge of death if she does not stop what she is doing. One day feeling depressed Lisa begin taking pills and has a strange dream. A man in a robe came to her and told her she was famine. She thought it was a dream until the scales of famine appeared in front of her.

    Lisa meets Death. A wildly handsome boy who tells her that she is indeed famine and she needs to "go thee out unto the world" doing her duty as famine. Famine meets War and war it is. Famine and War do not get along. War nicknames her mouse for being something to so week and bony. Finally in the end, Lisa finds her strength as Famine and fights with War.

    Jackie did an magnificent job writing this book. The plot was something out of this world. Her writing... the way she wrote those hard scenes was amazing. She did a great job giving the reader a great insight to the world of famine, hunger, disease. I love how she was able to bring paranormal with something real together and create something exciting. Her story is a amazing read. This is a story that I can read over and over again. and that I would recommend you read. When I was reading this, I was so excited and enticed that I could not put this down. I felt for Lisa in every struggle that she had.


    You need to read this book. When you read this, it will submerged you into the world of anorexia in a way you never saw. You will see the hardships, the lies, the pain, the voices, that the person goes through. Even though this book is paranormal, it was very informative in anorexia.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 5, 2013

    I really liked this book. In fact, I think it should be added to

    I really liked this book. In fact, I think it should be added to the required reading list for high schools across the country.
    It's not a preachy book by any means, but it does very well at showing the awful downsides that accompany anorexia.Interwoven with this very real look at a serious disorder is a moving tale of a troubled young girl recruited to become Hunger - one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. 
    I found the characters to be very relatable and the prose to be both simple and yet powerful in getting its point across.
    I highly recommend this book to everyone, it's a quick read and totally worth it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2013

    Absolutely riveting

    This book was very well written and spoke to the soul. Going straight to the heart of eating disorders. Just graphic enough. Highly recommend this anf the rest of the books in the series.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    I really enjoyed this book. It took a serious subject and brough

    I really enjoyed this book. It took a serious subject and brought it to your attention while it also sprinkled in some sci-fi entertainment. You get to see and experience the life of someone struggling with an eating disorder, which, unless you have ever gone through this or had a family member suffer with this, you would really never know what goes on in their minds. I love the way Ms. Kessler spins the tale of the Four Horsemen into this story. This is how our main character battles her eating disorder and becomes at peace with herself. I highly recommend this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2013

    I really loved this book. It is completely different from anythi

    I really loved this book. It is completely different from anything I had ever read before and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I would highly recommend this book to YA and adult readers alike!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2012

    Is it good

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 13, 2012

    Substandard ending but still recommended

    This book started off pretty strong. I’ve never really given much thought to the inner thoughts of individuals with eating disorders. Hunger brought a new awareness to me and in many ways touched home. Despite being surrounded by individuals who loved her, she still felt unworthy because of her appearance. I’ve stood in the mirror many times prodding my growing, squishy belly, wondering if my husband still finds me attractive… loves me as much as when we first met. High scores for the beginning. Not sure how spoiler-like the rest of this review is, so I’ll give you the warning now. Toward the middle of the book, Lisa stepped into her horseman role–Famine. I think this aspect of the book missed the mark. When I think of famine, a shortage of food in an area comes to mind. In Hunger, the meaning of famine was blurred to resemble greed more than anything as she turned her anger toward individuals who ate freely or in excess–punishing them because they didn’t have the hangups about food like she did. I’m really into paranormal, but the further I progressed into the book, the less realistic it became. The mystical aspects reached a point where I stopped believing a supernatural world like the one described existing. Then I reached the ending–a chance to bring it full circle to Lisa’s issues of anorexia–and the author blew it. This work was a novella, but it really needed a bit more on the back end to have nailed it. For an issue as deep as anorexia, I really would have liked it to be worked out on paper rather than brushed under the rug with the idea she got the help she needed. Recommendation: Despite the ending being substandard, I’d still recommend this work to anyone who has looked in the mirror and wished the reflection hosted an image other than what’s there.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 4, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I struggle with what to rate this because although I did like it

    I struggle with what to rate this because although I did like it, I also had a few problems with it. For starters I found Lisa to be an extremely hard character to like, until about half way through the book. I understand that Lisa suffers from a very serious disease, and I did feel sympathetic towards her but also a bit angry, as she kept pushing people away. I also couldn't understand how Lisa's dad never realized that she was sick and needed help.

    I did enjoyed the relationship between Lisa and her steed though and I liked how her affection for the horse brought out a strength in her that she hadn't possessed before. I also really liked how we got to see things from the Black Horse's POV. It certainly added a very unique perspective to the story.

    Death was by far my favorite character, he's funny yet stoic. He's also the best of the horseman, but then again, I don't think enough time was spent with the other horseman. I did appreciate that War was portrayed as a women, since so often War is blamed on men. The novel was very short and often moved to quickly. I felt like I had just started to dig into it and then it was over.

    At no time during the novel are eating disorders ever glamorized. Jackie Morse Kessler uses her own past experience with bulimia to help tell the story of Lisa and what she's physically and mentally going through. I find it extremely brave to share such a personal thing about yourself with complete strangers, and although Lisa is not based on Jackie, she is very loosely based on one of Jackie's friends.

    I commend Kessler on her originality, but I think I expected more to the supernatural side of the story. I do think the novel's worth checking out though, especially if you've ever suffered from or know someone struggling with an eating disorder.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 30, 2011

    Blah

    This book was a little shy of ok. It was very short which doesn't automatically make it bad, but there was little substance to it. I still have huge questions, but I don't know if I would be willing to read more

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 5, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Powerful & Honest Without Being Overwhelming

    4.5

    Lisabeth Lewis' life as an anorexic girl in denial, slowly killing herself, could have easily made Hunger and issues book, but it's so much more than that. Kessler's writing is haunting and terrifying in its blunt telling, yet entertaining at the same time. Although short in length, the book packs quite a punch. Kessler makes the reader think, feel, and hurt with Lisa. We know the depths of her hunger and how that little voice inside her head is beating her down.

    And it is so sad that anyone ever feels that way. Because they shouldn't. We shouldn't. Yet we do.

    Lisa's role as Famine leads her to learn more about that voice in her head, about the hunger that plagues the world, and about how to fight for life. All this can be heavy and some of the descriptions even made me nauseas, but I loved the book nonetheless. Kessler writing is raw, but beautiful at the same time. She grabs you by the shoulders and shakes you until you wake up and pay attention - that's how jarring some scenes are.

    Heavier moments are broken by the other Horsemen, War, Pestilence, and Death. War brings attitude, Death brings such morbid humor, and Pestilence becomes quite the teacher. I've read many reviews that gush about Death, but it was Pestilence who glued me to the page. His scene, while not funny like many of Death's appearances, made me think.

    Hunger is a great book, no doubt about that. Difficult to read at times? Yes. Entertaining? Yes. But more than anything else, it's the message behind the story of Famine that got to me. I implore you to read this book, but don't stop there. Devour it, soak it in, and read the author's note because even though the 174 pages of fiction got to me, it was the author's note that tied it all up and hit me the hardest.

    Opening line: Lisabeth Lewis didn't mean to become Famine. ~ pg. 1

    Favorite lines: "Thou art Famine, yo," Death said. "Time to make with the starvation." ~pg. 49

    And another one:

    This wasn't incessant appetite or some internal appeal to be fed that she could ignore. This was a tortured beast bellowing, scrabbling toward either survival or surrender.
    This was unbearable. ~ pg. 97

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 27, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent Read

    Having heard about this book starting this summer at Romantic Times, I was very interested in reading it. Being a comic book fan from way back, I had seen an anorexic girl as Famine before, but in a novel format I was expecting it to be a lot more involved. Any of you who read back into the X-Men vault for their use of Famine would agree that it was nearly possible to not even catch the girl in question was anorexic.

    In Hunger we as readers ride along in Lisabeth's head. You hear her Thin Voice, you watch as she counts calories and equates them to time on the exercise bike. You watch as her friend goes through the very clinical steps to binging on food. This very raw view of the eating disorders makes it an uncomfortable book to read in spots. Not that this slowed me down, but it made characters in very fantastical situations very real.

    Additionally, the ending of it left you with a message of hope. It is hard to state the reasoning behind this without spoiling any of the story. Just know that it does not leave you with thinking there is anything that is good about having an eating disorder. The author makes that abundantly clear in her end notes at the back of the book which include contact information to get help if you are suffering from an eating disorder.

    While a being a bit raw and difficult of a story to watch unfold, it was also something I couldn't look away from. It takes a very hard lesson to learn and puts it out there plainly, something that could very well give thoughts to those in similar situations. Even if you have not gone through their trials, it is definitely a book that gets you thinking. One of the better books I have read recently.

    I would rank it around a 4 stars out of 5. It likely could be even higher, but I am still torn on the ending. Of course that just goes to show I am still thinking about it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 30, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Unique and interesting read!

    When I started reading Hunger by Jackie Morse Kessler I realized that I haven't read any stories written in the third-person point of view in a long time. Not that I don't like that particular point of view, its just that I haven't read from that POV in a while. I don't prefer a specific POV over the others, but it was nice for a change.

    The concept of the story was different too. Hunger, the first in a trilogy (I believe), focuses on anorexia. Although I don't know anyone with this issue, it is a big problem amongst teens. The book doesn't drag on with the main character, Lisa, dealing with her anorexic problems. Kessler weaves an interesting, though short, story about seventeen year old Lisa Lewis becoming Famine. She doesn't use her new power to destroy people's lives, however, she uses it to destroy hunger and help people in distant parts of the world. Overall, Hunger is a very unique and interesting read.

    I love the cover, its what drew me to read the book. The Scales on the cover represent Lisa's symbol of office as Famine. The ending was sweet, and in the author's note, Kessler tells us a little bit about her own experience with Bulimia years ago. She also mentions that if you happen to purchase a copy of Hunger, a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the NEDA (National Eating Disorders Association).

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 26, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Not as good as it could have been

    I wanted to like this book more than I did. The major complaint I had about it was its length because it felt extremely rushed. The good part about the book though is the message that it delivers, and I consider the way in which it does this to be completely original. I still feel that it could have been so much better, but this will not stop me from picking up the next in the series since I enjoyed it, no matter how rushed it felt.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    review taken from One Book At A Time http://onebooktime.blogspot.com

    I have to admit this book was completely original. I loved how the author has taken a biblical reference and made it into something modern. All 4 of the horseman are included in this book, but we only get a real look at Famine (although Death plays a pretty good role as well). By the end of the book I truly wondered if Death choose Lizabeth as Famine because she was anorexic. It was a way to help her see past her problem and see people who were really hunger. I think it helped put her eating disorder in perspective. I liked how the supernatural played into this story. Horses that no one can see, traveling huge distance in the blink of an eye, and the awesome power to create hunger. I thought it was impressive that Lizabeth managed to find away to use her power for good. In turn I thought this created an awesome showdown with War. I was impressed with how the author handled the delicate issue of an easting disorder. It showed Lizabeth vulnerable. I liked how the author was able to show that even those who you think are total control of themselves are likely putting on a show. And sometimes, the ones who care about you the most are saying something you don't want to hear.

    So, why the 3 butterflies? There's two main reasons. First, I really think the book could have been longer. At under 200 pages, I just wasn't satisfied. I know everything ties up nicely, but I wanted more. I think the author could have expanded on some things. Second, I hate nitpicking, but when something still stands out in my mind 2 weeks after I read the book, I have to mention it. I dislike talk about bodily functions. There's a passage describing Lizabeth's struggle to have bowel movement. Now maybe this is a real problem with eating disorders, but I just didn't like the way the author presented it. And, it didn't add to the story. There's also a part with a very detailed description of Lizabeth's friend and her bulimia. While, I do think this helped show something important to Lizabeth, it was just really hard to read (I think this might be partly due to my own aversion to throw-up).

    I will be continuing this series though. The author has something to offer her and I want to see were the series goes!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2