Customer Reviews for

The Hunt for Zero Point: Inside the Classified World of Antigravity Technology

Average Rating 4
( 17 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2005

    Intelligent and well writing, you wont want to put it down.

    A wonderfully written book that delivers continued excitement and intrigue. Cook's facts are astounding. A great read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2004

    A maddening search for a maddening truth

    Nick Cook, aviation editor for Janes Defence Weekly, investigates a technology that seems to have vanished with startling but only partial results. The book traces his search for the remnants of gravity experiments conducted in the US before WWII and in Germany during WWII, experiments that continued publicly until the fifties. The book is frustrating, the answer apppears to be around the next corner or the one beyond that. That is the nature of his search. For most of us the original claim, the fox that begins his hunt, is as preposterous as Hogwarts but his cautious hunt will lead you to conclusions that your friends will call preposterous also. An amazing book on many levels.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 29, 2011

    military innovation must read

    Cook does an excellent job of describing how the need for an edge in defense pushes innovation. Should be part of every innovation practioners library.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2003

    a space between myth and reality

    Using his position as editor of the prestigious Jane's Defense Weekly as a platform of credibility, Cook plumbs the fascinating space between hazy myth and hard reality in an attempt to unravel the threads of the UFO mystery running through history from WWII to the present. Like a blind man describing the elephant, Cook gropes and blunders his way from clue to clue, talking to industry and government insiders, who spice the mystery (on purpose?) as much by what they don't quite say as by what they do. The foundation for Cook's journey is a well researched history of technological intrigue, starting with an interest by the U.S. in post WWII Nazi science that seems dogged to the point of unnatural. Cook's final picture of the elephant is as fascinating as it it fuzzy. I was left with the distint impression that there is a "there" there. A darn good read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2002

    This book didn't quite make it

    I wanted to wait for a reponse from Nick Cook via Jane's in response to the numerous questions I had after reading his book before writing this review. This book is a gigantic effort and it is obvious he put in lots of work, but he fails to ask the obvious questions or come up with conclusions that his own evidence requires. The book asserts that captured experimental Nazi disks are the likely explanation for the flying saucer sightings of the 1940's but he doesn't question how craft in their infancy of development went from zero to extremely advanced in sixty seconds. The book contains far too much nomenclature on aircraft, and is in parts, tedious and contradictory. Mr. Cook apologizes in his e-mail and states he should have perhaps a little more clear on some points. He is a gentleman in my book because he took the time to respond to my queries. This is the second review I have done and I have raised this book a star to 4. It is worth reading and exposes a side to Nazi science experiments which were up to now unknown.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2013

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    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2012

    NICK

    I love this book, I have been studying nazi ufos and I Am also reading the ss brotherhood of the bell so if ur interested in conspiracy and ufo
    this is a good book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2003

    The Hunt for Zero Point is a hit!

    I enjoyed the balanced and focused approach to investigating the cold trail left over from the Cold War in determining whether a real antigravity device was created. Avoiding intergalactic aliens, pod people and big foot, the author remains fosued on the target. Interesting viewpoint about the AG device being akin to a resistor. (I myself think that when we discover it, it will be a solid state device, not need cryogenics to run it, have no moving parts, and yet we still will not know what makes up gravity -- similar to our lack of knowledge of the true nature of electricity, yet that lack of understanding not hampering our ability to make a better television.) Two errors I detected, which I feel even a nonscientist like Nick should have captured, were found in the first few pages of the book. One: he states that electromagnetic/gravitational phenomena requires the solving of 'nonlinear differential equations.' Later on a touch of dyslexia hits him and he states the study involves the solving of 'linear nondifferential equations.' Hmmm, I never heard of those before... The second item was that he states that Newton identified the nature of gravity. That is incorrect; Newton codified the behavior of gravity. Because no one yet knows what gravity is. Not even Einstein.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2002

    Reading between the Lines = Anti-gravity Is Real

    After reading this book, then looking at others' reviews, i find it incredible that people exhibit the 'armchair' approach to subjects involving coverups and conspiracies. First and foremost, after reading the book, I actually researched more books into anti-gravity and found that the key names mentioned DO exist and that the themes ARE out there and exposed. The book mentions that several pieces of the puzzle have been found over 50 years, but a theory to explain this new strand of science is non-exstent. Remember, it took almost 50 years from Relativity Theory (ealry 1900's) to get to the Atom Bomb (1st exploded in 1945) I think the central aim of the book is NOT to answer conclusively, but to get YOU the public to not be so gullible in just sitting in your 'armchair' reading a 400 page book expecting EVERYTHING to be presented conclusively. Questions such as 'if they've spent 50 years on it why isn't in the public domain?' which is a common 'review' simply means the reader has NOT understood one of the messages of the book: The RESULTS from antigravity research is not in the vested interest of the western/corporate world and there is a defence against it becoming a commercial reality. A name not mentioned in the book is SEARL... and for those who don't read from the 'armchair' should research this name to find out what does happen when you make significant breakthroughs such as those men in Nick Cook's novel. Read this book, write your list of questions, then research more. This is a ground-breaking attempt by a layman. If more laymen (like me) are inspired to follow similar paths of inquiry then the truth is bound to come out in its proper reality.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2002

    I CAN'T STOP READING YOU

    This is one of the most exciting books I've recently read. A recent article about Boeings work on "anti-gravity" underscores this books theme. "Anti-gravity" is coming to a town near you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2002

    I want my money back

    This is one of the worst books I've read in a while. I can't decide if Nick Cook knows better and just produced this thing cynically as a way to make money, or if he really has joined the ranks of the believers who propose that the government has really made anti-gravity technology work and that's what explains the UFO phenomenon. From proposing that the 'foo fighters' of WWII were a Nazi secret project to a guy who supposedly built a space ray in his apartment, Cook has me genuinely confused about whether he can't sort out fact from (wild) speculation and self-dramatization or has just decided that there is an endless market for this kind of "non-fiction." My advice is: Save your money for books about real science.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2002

    A Starting Point

    The book has a tendency to innudate one with facts, but offers no real conclusions on those facts. Granted it is investigating black ops and hidden history, but it fails to ask logical questions that arise from the investigations. A good starting point for one investigating zero point technology and its possible history, but not really answering any questions what so ever.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2002

    The Hunt For Zero Point

    I agree, Nick Cook makes a good attempt to discuss some of the black-ops stuff. I thought it interesting how he takes events that occur in different time periods with different places and people in the world and tries to make a connection: Such as the Philadelphia Experiment and the Hutchinson Effect -- metal that bends and/or becomes translucent under high voltage. His description of how the B-2 Stealth Bomber's aerodymanics were being modified by high voltage was also an interesting concept. Only the design engineers would be able to answer that point, for sure. I think there's a lot in this world that is hard to explain. I agree with previous reviews that his constant jumping back and forth from 1945 to the present can be pretty confusing. Perhaps if he would of laid the book out chronologically, it may have been more helpful. I think it was interesting too how he only mentioned the work performed by Tesla, and how Tesla "shot" an beam of electricty that overshot his target and flattened a large area of trees in upper Siberia. This has been well documented and I think the book really underestimates the significance of this event, for only today are we just beginning to develop high-powered lasers and other weapons. The book contains a few facts surrounded by a lot of conjecture. Nick Cook should know this would make a great documentary movie.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2002

    Lost in Time...

    Author Nick Cook admits that he is not a scientist. Neither am I. And therefore, I can't possibly judge the validity of the scientific evidence he presents. However, he does write a great detective story, detailing his travels across the United States and Europe in search of proof that antigravity technology exists and is operable. One caveat I have about this book is that the chronology is badly muddled--the reader can't tell whether he/she is reading about something that occurred in 1995 or in 2000 or whenever. Considering his credentials as an award-winning journalist, Cook's omission of dates can't be due to carelessness. Rather, this lack of a clear timeline seems to be deliberate and purposeful--and I can't help wondering why. One other thought: if the US military does have antigravity capability and has been and still is keeping it secret for over 50 years, why was Cook allowed to publish this book?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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