Customer Reviews for

I Am a Strange Loop

Average Rating 4
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2008

    Brilliant explanation of the mind

    This book was a compelling read for me since: it is very new at this time it investigates the origin of consciousness and it seemed to have less scientific or religious fervor behind it. Plus the author has won a Pulitzer and seems to be a well respected professor teaching this topic. Having read it, I find Hofstadter to be a master at using analogy to elicit deep insight into every topic he presents. And he writes from his heart. You will learn much about the man behind the words. Which shows he is fully accountable for any bias or personal perspectives he may have. Although he clearly expresses his hope that you will share in his perceptions. I surely do. Is the mind a separate entity from the body? If not, then where does it come from? These questions are not immediately apparent but ultimately they are the questions he has written this book to address. The entire first half is spent introducing the reader to some background information that is presented in seemingly random fashion. But expressed in an entertaining, beautifully descriptive and informative way. There are many examples he uses to show the occurance of loops in everyday life. He starts with simple ones, like the toilet flush valve loop. Then more identifiable ones like looking into parallel mirrors which create what seems to be a corridor of forever repeating images. Or a microphone's feedback squeal when placed too close to the speaker. My favorite was his experiments with a camcorder pointed at the monitor. The crux of this background knowledge is his presentation of the work of Gödel - the only part of the book I found difficult to fathom. But this example shows how even mathematics creates loops, and has the incredible consequence of rendering logic inconclusive. This background information provides a perspective of thought that serves to show that the mind actually creates itself! He proposes that the mind does not exist until it becomes self aware. Before that, we are just unconscious beings on the level of base animals. His ideas about the levels of mindfullness of animals and even insects is also quite interesting to me, since it is something that most of us have considered but rarely speak about. His compassion has prompted him to become a vegetarian, yet interestingly, he has absolutely no respect for mosquitos! But then he goes on to explain how our consciousness evolves as it experiences itself, and the selfs of others. Adding another wrinkle to his theory to shows that there is cross-talk between 'souls' and that seeing others is key to seeing ourselves. He brings up quite a few other interesting topics and perspectives that explain his reasoning, all of which he presents with great skill. As you read this, without the tremendous insight of Hofstader, I don't expect you to take my word for it. And of course, I wouldn't have either, before reading this book. But perhaps, if you read it, you will learn something about yourself that right now, seems absolutely impossible.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2008

    A reviewer

    How often do we classify intelligent, scientific, reductionistic-determinists as non-human? Too often. After reading Hofstadter's 'I Am a Strange Loop' I am convinced that he is much more human than me and walks this world with a larger soul. Hofstadter reveals himself when he innocently suggests that people would not kill mosquitoes if they firmly believed the insects to be conscious creatures. I don't know about you, but I would kill a blood-sucking mosquito regardless of its level of consciousness. Why? Because it's taking my blood, can't defend itself, and I am a whole lot bigger. Hofstadter's description of consciousness is brilliant, yet, the convincing logic inherent in it doesn't move me. I am moved by the willingness of this book's author to open himself up to me. He tells of his wife's death and that his concern was not so much what he had lost, but rather, what she had lost. I'm sorry. I've lost loved ones and have never considered what they lost by dying. I've always been too busy worrying about myself. Hofstadter talks about the noncentralizedness of consciousness, that 'I' can be present in another's brain and another in mine. What openness to an expansion of consciousness! I tend to act as a miser with who I am. I'm not apt to share my soul with another or take another soul within my individual brain. It is not surprising that Hofstadter considers empathy the most valuable of human traits, and Albert Schweitzer as one of humanity's best examples of its manifestation in the world. Read this book to understand who you are. Read this book to engage in great philosophical debate. But most of all, read this book to spend time with a thinker who never discounts his feelings, a non-religious philosopher who nevertheless has pushed this reader's spirituality to new heights.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2012

    The short description of this book is: Nonsense about nonsense.

    The short description of this book is: Nonsense about nonsense. My short review of the book is bad nonsense about wonderful nonsense.

    Let me start with the subject of the book, nonsense which I find wonderful. Gödel and Turing demonstrated that the airtight Principia Mathematica of Russell is not as airtight as previously believed. This is a fantastic insight into thinking itself. In a sense ironically, the insight is that self reference, and in particular, thinking about thinking, will get you in trouble and turn everything into nonsense, albeit very useful and intriguing nonsense. But, there go absolute truths. It is indeed a fascinating subject worthy of a lot of pondering.

    So, any treatise of the subject will necessarily be nonsense also. But the book, which to me was bad nonsense, does not do justice to the subject. It is ten times longer than it needs to be. While some of Hofstadter’s concoctions have value, stating each one multiple times in extremely lengthy ways left me trying to figure out how to skip most of his boring verbiage to find the next significant point. Also, his condescending approach constantly telling you that you have to agree with him, particularly when there are plenty of reasonably nonsensical ways to disagree, is way too annoying. For example, souls come in different sizes and although there is a unit of measurement no soul can ever be measured, but souls can be ranked by size and we HAVE to agree with this and his rankings. Really? That’s what I call bad nonsense.

    So, If you have a lot of patience and don’t mind putting up with bad nonsense, go ahead; you’ll likely get something out of this book. Otherwise, unless you are extremely stubborn, chances are you’ll throw the thing into the “will never be finished” book pile.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2008

    Cleverest book you'll ever read

    This book will take you on a wonderful (and 'loopy') journey through the time, the brain, mathematics, and the concept of self. Hofstadter has an excellent command of language and presents numerous complex topics in a very understandable and readable way. You will 3 this book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2007

    A reviewer

    When he was 27, Douglas Hofstadter wrote Gödel, Escher, Bach, a bestselling book loved by precocious teenagers and computer hackers. Its mixture of logic, music and visual art blended the richness of the humanities and the rigor of the sciences in an altogether unforgettable confection that won a Pulitzer Prize. But GEB, as it is affectionately known, was widely misunderstood. Now, at age 62, Hofstadter tries to get his message across more forcefully. Using invented dialogues, fanciful metaphors, mathematical analogies and light-hearted stories, he limns again and again his central point: The self is an illusion or, as he says, 'a hallucination hallucinated by a hallucination.' While this may seem a depressing or, at least, odd conclusion (If the self is unreal, then who is reading this?), it's not. In fact, Hofstadter¿s conclusion has some surprisingly moving consequences about how human beings should regard themselves, other people and animals. This book is a punning, playful meditation on the logical, rather than neuro-biological, structure of the self. We highly recommend this gorgeous, rich, magical work to anyone who wants to see eye to eye with his or her 'I.'

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 2, 2012

    This is an excellent book.

    Hofstadter writes well, on the concept of "thought". Through the use of analogies and first account stories he is able to walk the reader through a series of discussions on human consciousness. He avoids overwhelming the reader on specific subjects but discusses in minor detail everything from cerebral development and physics to human behavior and basic psychology. The book feels more or less like a discussion between the reader and Hofstadter.

    Easy to pick up and hard to put down.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2009

    We are strange loops

    Wonder where our souls originate? Wonder why you inhabit the body you inhabit? Wonder why you are your I and other are theirs? Professor Hofstadter takes us on a wonderful journey and explains the sights as we go long. We travel through theoretical mathematics (not as dense and difficult using Hofstadter's explanations), the essence of metaphor, and how we as humans use symbols to define ourselves to our world, each other and most importantly to ourselves (hence the strange loop). I highly recommend this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1