Customer Reviews for

I Am the Chosen King

Average Rating 4
( 33 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(16)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 12 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted March 25, 2011

    Well written

    In the 11th Century, the celibate and highly religious Saxon King Edward sat on the throne of England. The only surviving son of Queen Emma "Ælgifu", Edward came to the throne he never wanted harboring resentment against the mother that forced him to grow up abandoned in exile and baring a fierce loyalty to the Norman nobles and clerics who raised and protected him in his mother's stead. Edward played a wicked game of politics to force his mother out of power and to cow her supporters among the Earls of England. But was he too much in bed with Normandy for the comfort of the Saxon Earls? Did he really promise the Saxon throne to the Norman bastard Duke William?

    King Edward's choices and decisions set the stage for one of the shortest reigns in English history: the last Saxon King Harold. Son of Earl Godwin, Harold devoted himself to England as his father had done before him. When King Edward died without an heir, the council of Earls elected Harold to the throne of England in the hopes that he could defend her from the growing Norman threat. His anointment, though, had quite the opposite effect. Duke William "the bastard" launched a military campaign so immense against England that it changed the history of English royalty forever.

    Helen Hollick does a superb job of continuing her story of the final years of Saxon ruled England. In the first book of this series, The Forever Queen, Helen brings to life the reign of the Queen Emma, the only queen to keep her crown through 5 kings. In I Am the Chosen King, Helen picks up where she left off and follows the sons of Emma and her champion, Godwin as they lead England to the seat of the last Saxon King.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 9, 2013

    I picked up this book not long after finishing Hollick's "F

    I picked up this book not long after finishing Hollick's "Forever Queen," the first in this Saxon Series. Having read very little about England's pre-Conquest history, I did enjoy learning about this time period, and the portions that I looked up to delve deeper into did show that the book is written about as accurately as anything about that time can be at this point.

    As with the first book, I felt that too much time was spent on details and events that did not seem to add to much to moving the story along. Though I enjoy epic novels, I do not so much like drudging through unnecessary side plots. I assume that Hollick was attempting to give a broad picture of the political maneuvering and historical backstory, but sometimes there was just too much. For example, the descriptions of Godwine's exile, Harold's time in Normandy, and Edward the Exile's decision to come to England all seemed to have little to add to the overall story.

    That being said, I did greatly enjoy this book. Having only basic knowledge of the events of 1066, I was enthralled with the people and events that led to the Battle of Hastings. All of the what-if's and if-only's are expertly taken advantage of in Hollick's writing to keep the reader on the edge of their seat, even knowing that Harold's demise is eminent. Since I did not previously know much about Harold, I do not know if his characterization is accurate, but it seems unlikely that he was as smart, caring, personable, and all-around wonderful as he is painted in this narrative. About the only dislikable thing about him is his apparent love for two women at the same time which is explained away as being necessary for his status (explained a few too many times as we are constantly reminded that he will eventually have to take a "real" wife).

    William of Normandy, on the other hand, is the evil, selfish, ambitious man that is loved only by his wife, and only by her because her other choice is a miserable life and marriage. The stereotypical good versus evil of Harold and William was a little over the top, which was a shame since the historical facts were so well presented, a more balanced and realistic personification of these two men would have been nice.

    The way this was written and the turn of events reminded me of the many Ricardian slanted novels that I have read about Richard III. Both the last Saxon king and last Plantagenet king were killed by usurpers with little claim to the throne, and many authors would have us believe that these doomed kings would have been England's greatest blessing had they reigned for more time. Whether it was actually true of either Harold or Richard, I suppose we can only conjecture.

    Overall, I found this a very worthwhile read that has opened me to another very interesting part of history. I would definitely recommend this and "Forever Queen" to any fan of English historical fiction.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 12 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1