Customer Reviews for

I Don't Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

16 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

Philosophy & Forensics

I have read the objections to this book. As with most debates, they have valid points, but they miss the point. Christian apologetic thought is about getting you to the point of realizing truth beyond all reasonable doubt. Faith will fill the gap. The thesis of this boo...
I have read the objections to this book. As with most debates, they have valid points, but they miss the point. Christian apologetic thought is about getting you to the point of realizing truth beyond all reasonable doubt. Faith will fill the gap. The thesis of this book is in the title. You can quibble about the details and pick apart minor parts of the puzzle, but in the end, the overwhelming evidence is........OK, read the the book.

As I read the book, I came to realize how I determine truth in life is no different than how we need to view Christianity. I work in the criminal justice system and we determine truth the old fashion way. I've seen rapist, domestic violence perpetrators, drunk drivers convicted beyond all reasonable doubt when we applied the use of classical philosophy, forensics and the scientific evidence (mostly circumstantial). In fact, our closing statements in court follow this logic, "In light of X, and X, and X, and X, what would a reasonable person conclude?" Are there holes in our arguments? Yes. Are there gaps that require faith? Yes. Will we ever reach 100% proof for Christ? No. Jesus Christ praised those that have true faith and trust without seeing first hand.

I view these types of books as tools for training Christians-young and old in developing their faith--adding depth sort of speak. If we can save a few atheists through debates-great, but in the end, Christians have to unequivocally have faith and trust in the Holy Spirit to do His work.

posted by ewias on October 12, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

6 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

Ok...Where do I begin

"I Don't Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist" was little more than a book of Christian apologetics. To begin with, the book started off with a faulty philosophical basis. It was filled with logical fallacies. One of which was the Law of Non-Contradiction, which the autho...
"I Don't Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist" was little more than a book of Christian apologetics. To begin with, the book started off with a faulty philosophical basis. It was filled with logical fallacies. One of which was the Law of Non-Contradiction, which the authors accused many others of violating. The authors also lump together Atheists and Darwinists as if they were one in the same,which was not necessarily true. The authors also misrepresented evolutionary processes and grossly omited evidence not their liking. I was also left unconvinced by their design arguments and their emphasis on the anthropic principle. Moreover, their arguments verifying the historical "truth" of the bible was clearly an attempt to validate the assumption that Christianity is the one and only truth as opposed to any other religion or system of thought. I could go on with other examples. In essence, this book will certainly appeal to those who want to validate their beliefs. It's arguments were not well founded as whole, though I must say some did get me to think. However, because of the nature of the writing and the clear agenda of the authors, I cannot call this book scholarly. I would more highly recommend books by John Shelby Spong and by Scotty McLennan which focus on the good Christians can do in society and the inner dimensions of the Christian faith--all without coming off as pontificial and haughty.

posted by random_skeptic on February 10, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2006

    A Funny Read

    Having faith is one thing, but believing that Christianity is truthful is just pure idiocy. This book repeats the same mindless propaganda that the church has regurgitated since the days of being a cult (yes Christianity was considered a cult when the Romans were still in power). You can't consider yourself a faith of love when you systematically and brutally convert or kill believers of other faiths while at the same time spewing that the others faiths are wrong and evil, having no morals. The eradication of the Gnostics, the crusades, the Spanish inquisition, non-involvement in the holocaust, these are the teachings of Christianity

    2 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted April 2, 2010

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    Posted October 20, 2013

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