Customer Reviews for

I, Robot

Average Rating 4
( 213 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(125)

4 Star

(46)

3 Star

(18)

2 Star

(13)

1 Star

(11)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

16 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

Great book, SF classic.

IMPORTANT: The book does not resemble the movie in any great detail. This is a must read for SF fans out there, packed in a very affordable package.

posted by 2744171 on May 5, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

'Robot' Runs Low On Power Batteris Not Included

You'll need to provide your own batteries to get 'I, Robot' up and running to speed. the famous three laws of robotics is the only groundbreaking contribution offered before the mechanics malfunction. Nothing of consequence happens that hasn't happened before or since...
You'll need to provide your own batteries to get 'I, Robot' up and running to speed. the famous three laws of robotics is the only groundbreaking contribution offered before the mechanics malfunction. Nothing of consequence happens that hasn't happened before or since. Questions of what defines selfawareness, what it is to be human and if such creations could eventually make humanity obsolete were explored in Fritz Lang's 1927 'Metropolis' and Karel Capek's 1921 'R.U.R. Rossum's Universal Robots.' Similar themes appeared in the 1970 release 'Colossus The Forbin Project' and again in 1984 with 'The Terminator' and following sequels. Considering the above mentioned works are far more eloquent than Asimov's entry it is no wonder the film adaption required required a major rework prior to reaching the big screen. Truth is, there's more talk than action. What is truly mindboggling is that Asimov, a holder of a PhD in biochemistry and author of over 400 books of diverse scientific and science fiction subjects, envisioned robots and computers as massive clunky creations. The total lack of inovative insight is shocking. Such harsh judgement is justified as great things are expected from those who are considered great, so when they fall so far short of these expectations there remains little to be said in their defense. Pass this one by.

posted by Anonymous on April 5, 2006

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

    Great book, SF classic.

    IMPORTANT: The book does not resemble the movie in any great detail.
    This is a must read for SF fans out there, packed in a very affordable package.

    16 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 8, 2008

    Very ahead of its time

    I, Robot by Isaac Asimov is made up of a series of nine science fiction short stories that all are connected through a robot psychologist named Dr. Susan Calvin. The stories are told as if Susan Calvin is relaying them to a reporter, the narrator. The first story, ¿Robbie¿ is about a young girl who has a robot friend, but her mother disapproves of the relationship. Her mother tries desperately to keep them away from each other. In the next few stories, we are told of two scientists who are distraught with problems in development of labor robots. The two come across danger while trying to relieve the issues almost costing them their lives in the process. A common thread among each story is the Three Law of Robotics, which underlines and governs the way robots should behave as well as the interaction of humans and robots. In the next five stories, Susan Calvin is the main character and the stories talk about the evolution of robots. The stories also talk about her removal from humanity. She retreats due to a mind-reading robot that discovers her romantic feelings for a fellow colleague. Throughout the novel the robots show intelligence and understanding which in some cases surpasses that of the humans. Soon the humans begin to realize that the robots may have more power then they themselves have. Their ability to deduce and analyze creates a major problem for the humans and it seems as though the robots could remove the humans. After their creation it is evident that the increasing knowledge of the robots will be too much for the humans. Isaac Asimov wrote a break through novel many years ahead of its time. His creativity and shear brilliance is shown through his attention to detail and development of the story as a whole. It is good read for anyone interested in the mind versus machine aspect of entertainment.

    11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2004

    Great book, no relation to the movie

    The book is pretty old, and has a few plot holes, but it's still very entertaining and makes you think a bit. Note that while the movie claims to be based on Asimov's books, that's a big fat lie. The movie takes two elements from these short stories: robots, and the Three Laws of Robotics. That's it. The inclusion of the movie picture on the cover of the new edition is a travesty. It would be more appropriate to put the poster from Mel Gibson's 'Passion' movie on the cover of the Bible -- hey, at least they have some characters and story elements in common!

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2004

    Better than the movie

    This book and the movie of the same title have very few things in common. The plot of the movie is not one of those things. This book is a wonderful collection of 'hard sci-fi' short stories that explore the implications (and complications) inherent in Asimov's Three Laws of Robotics. The movie is NOT based on any of the short stories in the book. In fact, the movie presents a rather apocalyptic view of intelligent robots in society, while the book attempts to show that robots would be a useful addition to society as long as the Laws work as advertised. The book is required reading for any true Science Fiction fan, but don't expect to find a preview of the movie. It ain't in there. (It's not a bad movie, really - it's kinda like 'Terminator meets Minority Report'.)

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    AWESOME!!

    This book is a collection of short stories tied together by a common theme that sets the stage for and ties together many of the other robot stories of Asimov and frames the three Laws of Robotics.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2006

    'Robot' Runs Low On Power Batteris Not Included

    You'll need to provide your own batteries to get 'I, Robot' up and running to speed. the famous three laws of robotics is the only groundbreaking contribution offered before the mechanics malfunction. Nothing of consequence happens that hasn't happened before or since. Questions of what defines selfawareness, what it is to be human and if such creations could eventually make humanity obsolete were explored in Fritz Lang's 1927 'Metropolis' and Karel Capek's 1921 'R.U.R. Rossum's Universal Robots.' Similar themes appeared in the 1970 release 'Colossus The Forbin Project' and again in 1984 with 'The Terminator' and following sequels. Considering the above mentioned works are far more eloquent than Asimov's entry it is no wonder the film adaption required required a major rework prior to reaching the big screen. Truth is, there's more talk than action. What is truly mindboggling is that Asimov, a holder of a PhD in biochemistry and author of over 400 books of diverse scientific and science fiction subjects, envisioned robots and computers as massive clunky creations. The total lack of inovative insight is shocking. Such harsh judgement is justified as great things are expected from those who are considered great, so when they fall so far short of these expectations there remains little to be said in their defense. Pass this one by.

    3 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 9, 2012

    Let me start off by saying this book has nothing to

    Let me start off by saying this book has nothing to do with the movie, to say that the I, Robot movie was freely adapted is a bit of an understatement. This book is a collection of stories about robots succeeding, and robots failing; quite the contrary to Will Smith in his action-packed thriller. These nine stories are told from the point of view of a woman named Dr. Susan Calvin, who is reciting them to a young reporter; the narrator. This book, to say the least, is way ahead of its time; published in 1950, the author, Isaac Asimov, had an unbelievable imagination that more modern authors lack today. He was able to create characters in thirty pages that some books can’t create in 300. He writes with such fluent knowledge and brilliance, you would expect him to have grown up with a robot in his home. He uses expertise he got through his Ph. D in biochemistry from Columbia University to craft nine short stories and blend them together with ease. This novel is not just one storyline, with the same characters, and the same conflicts; it is a whole collection of stories with many characters and many conflicts, I grew very fond of this short story plot line throughout my reading experience.
    Its not just the content of this book that makes it such a good read. Asimov writes with such brilliance and fluency that he can blend together several completely different storyline’s into one book, and make it believable. This book stands for so much more than the words and ideas written within the pages. This book represents a time portal into the future; the author writes what he perceives our future will look like and writes it in a way that convinces you the same. This book is intriguing, it makes you question your existence, your ideas and opinions. These stories are triumphant tales of success and failure, celebration and despair, and of confusion and absolute clarity. Isaac Asimov brings you into the future, shows you around, moves some curtains and some pillows away in order to show you the true future, in its true form. He shows you the positives and negatives to advancement in technology, and just how your opinion is formed on this topic is your decision up until that final page when the final story comes to a close and you retire to your thoughts and you questions that Isaac churned up through the use of short stories.
    So all in all, I loved this book and I would recommend it to anyone looking for a good read that will get you thinking. This is an intriguing, brilliant book that encompasses creative, inthralling conflicts with dynamic characters and inquisitive storyline’s. This breakthrough novel is worth reading (and thinking about).

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 7, 2010

    I, Robot; Better than the movie.

    I, Robot is a fantastic book that takes place in a futuristic world. Humans and robots live in harmony under three rules and as long as these rules aren't conflicted there is peace. As the robots are becoming more intelligent and needing the humans less and less, there was an uprising... The heros in the book will have to stop them all before it's too late. This is a science fiction book that will be best for someone interested in that subject.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2014

    Kenny

    "Like enforce rules or anything."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2014

    Nick

    "Listening? I don't understand."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2014

    Classic

    This is a re-read for me, classic Asimov that stands the test of time!


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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2014

    Sun

    Appears.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2014

    Hazel

    Appears

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2014

    Regina

    Wakes up in an old rusty truck. Opens the dor and hears a snap as it clashes to the ground

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2014

    Jordan

    Da<_>mmit, Clyde. * Walks away.*

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2014

    Ansley

    Walked in

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2014

    Garrett

    Walks in

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2014

    Rose

    "I'm Ready."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2014

    Clyde

    "Wait. Goddamnit." *teleports outh

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2014

    .

    .

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 213 Customer Reviews
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