Customer Reviews for

I'd Know You Anywhere

Average Rating 3.5
( 254 )
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(54)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

A COMPELLING STORY OF CAPTIVE AND CAPTOR

Prepare to be mesmerized, totally enthralled, and left with your mind questioning the meaning of true justice. Laura Lippman, author of the acclaimed Tess Monaghan series and last year's best selling Life Sentences, shows her mettle as a writer of intense, character ...
Prepare to be mesmerized, totally enthralled, and left with your mind questioning the meaning of true justice. Laura Lippman, author of the acclaimed Tess Monaghan series and last year's best selling Life Sentences, shows her mettle as a writer of intense, character driven, psychological dramas with the superb I'D KNOW YOU ANYWHERE.
This is a story that will linger with you long after you've read the last page or heard the last word.

Eliza Benedict is a seemingly unflappable mother of two living in suburban Maryland with her husband, Peter, and two children. The eldest is Isobel who has chosen to be called "Iso," although her father thinks it should be "Izzo" or people will see it as short for "isotope." She's a difficult teenager seeming to dislike everything since the family's return to America after six years in England. The Benedict son, 8-year-old Albie, is an affable child often plagued by nightmares.

All seems relatively normal in the household until the day a letter arrives - a "real letter" as Iso calls it addressed to "Elizabeth," the name she used "before" as Eliza now terms it. The "before" refers to before she was kidnapped the summer she was 15 by Walter Bowman, held captive for almost six weeks and then raped before miraculously finding herself free. The letter is from Bowman who is now on Death Row for killing another young girl and suspected of killing more. He wants to talk to Elizabeth as he still calls her.

Eliza has successfully managed to compartmentalize what happened to her that long ago summer. Peter knows about most of it, and the children know nothing. She believed that she had kept herself hidden from anyone connected with that event - from the unscrupulous writer who had penned a tacky version of her time with Bowman, from the press who might like to revive the story now that Bowman's execution date is nearing, and from Bowman himself.

She fears not only for herself but for her family, yet she also finds that she unable to totally escape from the control Bowman once held over her. Why did he let her live while the other girls died? Did she owe him anything? Does she owe a debt to the families of the other victims? Eliza answers his letter hoping that will be the end of it, but he asks for a phone call. He knows what strings to pull just as she recognizes the terrifying sociopath he is and the man he believes himself to be.

Alternating between past and present Lippman's story is scrupulously plotted as she details the affect the kidnappings have had not only on the victims and their families, but on others as well. These characters are clearly drawn, not only physically but psychologically as the story builds to a surprising denouement.

Highly recommended.

- Gail Cooke

posted by GailCooke on September 24, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

Not my kind of book..

I picked this book up because the concept seemed like it could have been interesting, and it had relatively high reviews. I ended up finishing the book only because I hate to start a book and not finish it. Getting through was work though..

"I'd Know You Anywhere" wa...
I picked this book up because the concept seemed like it could have been interesting, and it had relatively high reviews. I ended up finishing the book only because I hate to start a book and not finish it. Getting through was work though..

"I'd Know You Anywhere" was very slow going from the start. I found myself very bored two chapters in and it was hard for me to read more than a few pages at a time without pushing myself to go on. Only once or twice in the entirety of the book did I find myself actually wanting to read on and discover what happened next.

Beyond the fact that it was slow going, I felt the author was missing key descriptive passages. Where she over-explained and described certain scenes/houses/landscapes I felt she under-described the characters. The main character "Eliza" is a red head with kinky hair and a "shapely" body. That's about all I gathered. Her children weren't really described at all until well into the book, and other characters weren't even described at all.

I also found the authors writing style struck me as cheap and tawdry. The [brand] name dropping just stomped all over my nerves. Perhaps that's just not a style of writing I like, but the constant references to particular brand names and products just seemed ridiculous and I felt it will leave the book very dated in ten years.
At times it seemed the author was using bigger words than the story.

Certain characters (Trudy Tackett) were randomly introduced and had absolutely no purpose to add to the story line. It seemed like just a way to bounce the story around and draw it out..

The entire story hinted all along at some large unknown secret with absolutely no hints or indication as to what the big mystery was. The big "mystery" which didn't even climax until twenty or so pages to the end of the book was in the end pretty predictable and anti-climactic.

Overall, just not something I'd really recommend.

posted by SunnyMuffins on December 14, 2010

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  • Posted September 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A COMPELLING STORY OF CAPTIVE AND CAPTOR

    Prepare to be mesmerized, totally enthralled, and left with your mind questioning the meaning of true justice. Laura Lippman, author of the acclaimed Tess Monaghan series and last year's best selling Life Sentences, shows her mettle as a writer of intense, character driven, psychological dramas with the superb I'D KNOW YOU ANYWHERE.
    This is a story that will linger with you long after you've read the last page or heard the last word.

    Eliza Benedict is a seemingly unflappable mother of two living in suburban Maryland with her husband, Peter, and two children. The eldest is Isobel who has chosen to be called "Iso," although her father thinks it should be "Izzo" or people will see it as short for "isotope." She's a difficult teenager seeming to dislike everything since the family's return to America after six years in England. The Benedict son, 8-year-old Albie, is an affable child often plagued by nightmares.

    All seems relatively normal in the household until the day a letter arrives - a "real letter" as Iso calls it addressed to "Elizabeth," the name she used "before" as Eliza now terms it. The "before" refers to before she was kidnapped the summer she was 15 by Walter Bowman, held captive for almost six weeks and then raped before miraculously finding herself free. The letter is from Bowman who is now on Death Row for killing another young girl and suspected of killing more. He wants to talk to Elizabeth as he still calls her.

    Eliza has successfully managed to compartmentalize what happened to her that long ago summer. Peter knows about most of it, and the children know nothing. She believed that she had kept herself hidden from anyone connected with that event - from the unscrupulous writer who had penned a tacky version of her time with Bowman, from the press who might like to revive the story now that Bowman's execution date is nearing, and from Bowman himself.

    She fears not only for herself but for her family, yet she also finds that she unable to totally escape from the control Bowman once held over her. Why did he let her live while the other girls died? Did she owe him anything? Does she owe a debt to the families of the other victims? Eliza answers his letter hoping that will be the end of it, but he asks for a phone call. He knows what strings to pull just as she recognizes the terrifying sociopath he is and the man he believes himself to be.

    Alternating between past and present Lippman's story is scrupulously plotted as she details the affect the kidnappings have had not only on the victims and their families, but on others as well. These characters are clearly drawn, not only physically but psychologically as the story builds to a surprising denouement.

    Highly recommended.

    - Gail Cooke

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    I'D KNOW YOU ANYWHERE, by Laura Lippman,

    As a teenager, Elizabeth was kidnapped by a man who was later convicted of killing another young woman and sent to death row. Elizabeth returns to her family, who move to a different area in Maryland and she resumes her teenage life. She changes her name to Eliza and goes on with her life, gets through college and marries a good man, Peter Benedict. As Eliza Benedict, she has two children and a happy, if serene, life as wife and mother. Twenty-five years pass from the crimes of 1985 and by 2008 Bowman, the kidnapper, has reached the end of his appeals and his date with death approaches. Eliza receives a letter from Bowman as the result of Eliza's photograph appearing in the society section of a local magazine that Walter read in prison...Exciting, intriguing reading!

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 4, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Bridget's Review

    I loved this book! Laura is one of my favorite authors and this book was amazing! It's unlike any other book I have ever read. If you only read one book this year, make it I'd Know You Anywhere.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2015

    Cat

    Ok

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2015

    Shadow angel

    They are not killing each other really cry fighting which is crying and fighting. It is pathetc. Also smaug is there too so things could get ugly.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2014

    To Blaine

    You on anymore?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2014

    Yes

    Wbu

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2014

    Commander White

    So...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2012

    So good

    I luv this book so much i wish there was more books like this book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 11, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Really good story!!

    I really enjoyed this book.

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  • Posted April 17, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Highly Recommended!

    I really loved this book. It kept my attention to the very last page! Pick it up and you won't be disappointed!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    awesome drama

    love this book. kept me at the edge of my bed. love it. highly recommended.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 30, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A STERLING VOICE PERFORMANCE

    Linda Emond delivers a first rate voice performance as the protagonist, Eliza, in this psychological drama. Eliza, once known as Elizabeth, is a kind, self-effacing woman who endured over a month of terror when she was a teenager. As the author segues between that time and the present, all is reflected in Emond's voice. A stellar reading!

    Prepare to be mesmerized, totally enthralled, and left with your mind questioning the meaning of true justice. Laura Lippman, author of the acclaimed Tess Monaghan series and last year's best selling Life Sentences, shows her mettle as a writer of intense, character driven, psychological dramas with the superb I'D KNOW YOU ANYWHERE.
    This is a story that will linger with you long after you've read the last page or herd the last word.

    Eliza Benedict is a seemingly unflappable mother of two living in suburban Maryland with her husband< Peter, and two children - Isobel who has chosen to be called "Iso," although her father thinks it should be "Izzo" or people will see it as short for "isotope." She's a difficult teenager seeming to dislike everything since the family's return to America after six years in England. The Benedict son, 8-year-old Albie, is an affable child often plagued by nightmares.

    All seems relatively normal in the household until the day a letter arrives - a "real letter" as Iso calls it addressed to "Elizabeth," the name she used "before" as Eliza now terms it - before she was kidnapped the summer she was 15 by Walter Bowman, held captive for almost six weeks and then raped before miraculously finding herself free. The letter is from Bowman who is now on Death Row for killing another young girl and suspected of killing more. He wants to talk to Elizabeth as he still calls her.

    Eliza has successfully managed to compartmentalize what happened to her that long ago summer. Peter knows about most of it, and the children know nothing. She believed that she had kept herself hidden from anyone connected with that event - from the unscrupulous writer who had penned a tacky version of her time with Bowman, from the press who might like to revive the story now that Bowman's execution date is nearing.

    She fears not only for herself but for her family, yet she also finds that she unable to totally escape from the control Bowman once held over her. Why did he let her live while the other girls died? Did she owe him anything? Does she owe a debt to the families of the other victims? Eliza answers his letter hoping that will be the end of it, but he asks for a phone call. He knows what strings to pull just as she recognizes the terrifying sociopath and the man he believes himself to be.

    Alternating between past and present Lippman's story is scrupulously plotted as she details the affect the kidnappings have had not only on the victims and their families, but on others as well. Her characters are clearly drawn, not only physically but psychologically as the story builds to a surprising denouement.

    Highly recommended.

    - Gail Cooke

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    very enjoyable

    I always think I'm not going to like Laura Lippman's books, but I always do.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted March 6, 2011

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    Posted August 24, 2010

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    Posted July 9, 2011

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