Customer Reviews for

If Grace Is True: Why God Will Save Every Person

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Life changing and extremely inspirational.

I always considered meself to be a very strong Christian, and yet I found my eyes opened to a totally new perspective of God's love in this book. It is not a "utilitinarianism" view of all people being saved, but that the grace of God will be strong enough to bring eac...
I always considered meself to be a very strong Christian, and yet I found my eyes opened to a totally new perspective of God's love in this book. It is not a "utilitinarianism" view of all people being saved, but that the grace of God will be strong enough to bring each and every person to repentence and redemption through the grace of Christ.

I can not say enough good things about this book, and I've recommended it to everyone I know. It shows OUR need to be the ones who save ourselves choosing to accept God's grace. Those who don't accept His grace are damned. People have the need to be in control of their destinies, and need "justice" (or more correctly termed vengence) for those who act wrongfully. We just don't want to surrender to the fact that God's love for us is absolutely independent of our feelings and actions. Even if we hate Him, He loves us. He loves us and wants us saved. He has the desire and the power to do this. When we leave this life, He shows us His grace and love. This is so powerful that it will bring everyone to redeption. Those who lived a sinful life will realize the errors of their ways and be truly repentent. Of course, this would be quite painful and guilt ridden for them. It doesn't meant that "anything goes" and we can have a "get out of hell free" card. When we chose to live our lives on this earth separated from God's will, we are never happy. We are refusing the peace and joy that His grace gives. Our eternal life starts now. Don't you want to enjoy the unconditional love, joy, and peace that He offers us? In these trying times, we so often need Him to carry us through the sands of our hard lives.

Sorry this is so long, but it is truly a life changing book. It doesn't replace the Bible in ANY means what so ever. It bases most of its contents on the Word of God. However, it does give people who know the Word a wonderful view of our beloved Father who wishes to save all his precious children...not just those who agree with us. After all Christ came to heal the sick, not the well...and who amongst us is actually "well" afterall?

Please read this book!
Lisa

posted by Saved-by-Grace on March 13, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Of grace and gracelessness

Gulley & Mulholland gutted the tenants of the Christian religion so that it would conform to their doctrine of universal salvation. Obviously their argument is not a logical nor theological one, as it fails miserably to convince on those grounds. ------ One is left w...
Gulley & Mulholland gutted the tenants of the Christian religion so that it would conform to their doctrine of universal salvation. Obviously their argument is not a logical nor theological one, as it fails miserably to convince on those grounds. ------ One is left wondering what is their motivation for embracing a doctrine--universal salvation--that has been deemed heresy for more than 1,500 years? There seems to be two: the rigidity and gracelessness of the modern evangelical/fundamentalist church and a slight misunderstanding as to what God wants to do in comparison to what he will do. ------ I believe God does want every person to be saved; He certainly takes no delight in the condemnation and punishment of the wicked, as is demonstrated in the book of Jonah. However, it¿s one thing to believe in what God wants to happen as opposed to what will happen. The authors, not quite understanding the kindness and the severity of God, have decided that He will save everyone no-matter-what. ------ Gulley and Mulholland think fundamentalist/evangelical Christianity places too many restrictions on salvation. In order to compensate for the perceived stinginess of evangelical Christianity, the authors fell off the other side of the narrow road, and now proclaim that God will¿absolutely--save everyone. In many places throughout their book, the authors point out many places where the evangelical church has too narrow a view of God, the Bible, and Christianity; and as a result there is a Christian clique that is more interested in removing oneself from the world rather than saving it. In a self-revealing passage, the authors state: ¿So many people enter churches persuaded God is lurking in ambush. They come expecting fire and brimstone, and we¿ve been all too willing to heap it on. We¿ve slandered God¿s character too long. I regret the times I manipulated and coerced other with sermons designed to shame and frighten rather than celebrate the love of God. I failed to appreciate the depth of God¿s love.¿ (pg. 68) ------ Certainly churches exists like those the authors were apart of. However, this type of severity is not true of all churches, not even all evangelical churches. I have found several conservative churches that spend far more time preaching on the love and mercy of God then they do on eternal condemnation and the fires of hell, if they preach on those subjects at all! So it is obvious that Gulley and Mulholland are painting a select picture of fundamentalist Christianity using a very broad brush. ------ The authors are correct to state that God¿s love and grace must be the primary teaching of the Christian church; I have no problem with that. But God¿s unconditional love doesn¿t mean that we escape the fires of hell! Explicit throughout the scriptures, from Genesis to Revelation, is the need to take responsibility for your own actions, and God will reward or punish those actions in a fair and balanced way. If anything, God does not punish us nearly as severely as we deserve, yet there is a theme of punishment unto death throughout the Bible, and especially in the parables and teachings of Jesus. There are also times where Jesus explicitly states that punishment is eternal; but it is made clear that the ultimate decision concerning one¿s eternal destination is made by ourselves, not God! Through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, God has opened the door of eternal salvation, but we are constantly reminded that we must decide to walk through that door. ------ So while I do not agree with the author¿s solution to the problem of gracelessness in some churches, I do agree with their criticisms. It is my belief every church should extend as much love and grace as possible, and then even go beyond that! Churches more interested in your sins than your salvation only create pride and triumphalism, along with false expectations no one can rightly live up to. ------ God¿s unconditional love

posted by Anonymous on April 11, 2005

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2005

    Amen (before page 124)

    I think it is unfortunate that this book has been so harshly reviewed, but to each his/her own. I too have come to believe in the salvation of ALL of God's creation with two very large difference. While I have no problem questioning the inerancy of scripture, I do believe that there are a multitude of themes that are guided by the Holy Spirit. Primarily, the overarching theme of redemption through history. We begin in Genesis with the garden, move through the Old Testament with a continual narrowing of the Covenents between God and Man, then arrive at Christ who throws open the doors of Salvation to Jew and Gentile. Additionally, through the New Testament, we see a move by man from a select few [the tribes of Judah], to all of the known world. Additionally, the culmination of this move is demonstrated in Revelation where we have moved from a 'garden' setting with Adam and Eve, to the 'city of God' whose dimensions as described in Revelation encompass all of the known world. What a beautiful and compelling narrative. God has appropriated and redeemed the world we have created. Secondly, the authors while skating dangerously close to the edge of orthodoxy prior to page 124 largely reflect an orthodox view of salvation [See early church fathers particularly St. Gregory of Nyssa]. Ultimately, they fall into heresy when they reject the divinity of Christ, and the necessity of atonement. By heresy, I do not believe that they are anathema, or damned or incapable of entering Heaven, I do believe that they have lost sight of the narrative of God. I believe that this loss of narrative was born of a desire to emphasize the need for Western Christianity to reclaim the roots of it's faith. Evangelical, Protestant and Catholic faiths have become beholden to the Latin view of theology that focuses almost exclusively on Soteriology and Atonement. Whereas most [though certainly no all] of those early church fathers that both east and west churches claim along with the 7 ecumenical councils, strive for a relational understanding of faith that is maximilized through Christ. Though I regret their straying from what I consider an orthodox understanding of universal salvation, I have no doubt that I will be at the banquet table of the Lord with them and all of you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2004

    An enjoyable introduction to Universalism

    I read this book from the beginning to the end I found it so enjoyable. The thing that struck me most about the book was the authors' genuine love for all humanity, for all human beings. It is from this perspective that they interpret their religious scriptures and with which they view God. They talk about the process of giving up their judgemental views about people, and learning to see everyone through the eyes of compassion. They ask themselves some tough questions. Does the idea of God as a loving father fit with the idea that most of humanity deserves eternal punishment? Is the desire to see punishment in the afterlife for our enemies and forgiveness for ourselves a selfish motive? One analogy I liked is one in which they compare Heaven to a huge banquet table with room for everyone. They believe God wants everyone to be at the table. Any empty seat would be a victory for evil. Their views guide their religion to be an inclusive one rather than an exclusive one. No one is 'Left Behind.' The authors believe that there are Bible verses for and against their position. They are willing to admit that different authors in the Bible presents differing views on God. This is probably too difficult for many to accept. I read this book because I wanted to learn about Universalism. I enjoy studying all religious beliefs, and so that is the background from which I come. I would recommend it to all those who have a curiousity about the concept of Universal Salvation.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2003

    Good Read

    One would think that tolerance is a quality that Jesus lived out his entire life and we should hold the belief that Jesus offers salvation to all...either here and now...or even after death. Is it possible for anyone in their right mind to deny God and his promise of Salvation? God is love.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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