Customer Reviews for

Immortal Bird: A Family Memoir

Average Rating 4
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2012

    Immortal Bird is both a touching and wrenching portrait of many

    Immortal Bird is both a touching and wrenching portrait of many things - a father's love for his son, a gifted child overcoming incredible adversity, a family's love and support in the face of that adversity, the impotence of that family struggling to cope with hard-to-comprehend medical care and decisions, and the callous indifference of the doctor managing that care. It is impressive on all of those levels, but the last two (which particularly come to the fore in the last third of the book) are the most powerful. As part of that section, Doron Weber paints what seems to be a critical though fair portrait of a medical professional's decisions and decision-making process. Unfortunately for Damon, she displayed an ultimately fatal incompetence and stunning indifference in dealing with his his condition. The only thing that's left unclear, and that Weber and the rest of us can never know, is where the incompetence began and the indifference ended.

    What's frightening about the book is that the author was so perfectly positioned to learn and understand the issues at hand, yet despite all of his advantages was left in a position of dependence on an incredibly negligent doctor. Clearly an extremely bright and accomplished fellow, Weber could draw on personal and professional connections to learn all that a layperson could about appropriate and inappropriate approaches to treating his son. Yet he still had to depend on that lead doctor, who made crucially, grossly incorrect decisions that led to his son Damon's death after, all too ironically, successful heart surgery.

    I've read one critical review here at B&N that portrays the author as being misogynistic. That's unfair and unfounded. True, the lead doctor is a woman, as are (if I recall correctly) her junior associates. But incompetence and indifference know no gender boundaries. At no point does Weber even hint that the flawed medical treatment flows from their being women. And plenty of women in the book are portrayed in a very favorable light. In fact, as depicted on one memorable scene, a leading medical expert whose recommendations the lead doctor ignored was female.

    While I found the medical drama the most powerful and sad part of the book, Immortal Bird is of course about much more than this. Many will identify with the story on those other levels. The struggles, pain and yes, joy, that the family experienced throughout Damon's life, including in its closing stages, are touching. And Damon truly was a special guy, both for how he dealt with his condition and for many attributes that had nothing to do with that battle. Much of the book is about him, his spirit and his accomplishments, not about his illness and death.

    In the end, then, Immortal Bird accomplishes its purpose of immortalizing Damon Weber. But for many of us, as moved as we are by that individual story, the even more searing imprint is about how the medical profession, starting with medical education, needs to change to minimize the indifference and incompetence that cut short the life of a wonderful young person. It could happen to any of us. It could happen to any of our children.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2012

    Immortal tears

    Wow. I honestly do not know what to say... i just closed the book and tears are still streaming from my eyes. This is the first book in a long time that has moved me so. This one will really change your prospective on a lot of things. Truly a beautiful story...just wow. Only thing i would like to say is that i think it is important to ignore Mr. Weber's tendencies... to be... well annoying and focus on the bigger notion of the story, if you can get past certain bits of frustration, you will really be touched! I applaud you Sir your son truly changed the world, and so have you by writing this book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2011

    A must read!

    In Immortal Bird: A Family Memoir, Doron Weber shares the inspiring yet heart-breaking story of his son Damon's medical battles starting with him being born with a heart defect and culminating with a successful heart transplant gone awry possibly due to substandard practice. Doron goes beyond telling a moving story; he makes the reader feel as if he/she personally knows the family. Damon Weber was a truly gifted actor during his short life and touched everyone he met with his dynamic, upbeat personality. The excerpts from Damon's blog add to the "personal" feeling of the book by giving the reader an inside look into how Damon talks to his peers which reinforces his charismatic personality. I couldn't put Immortal Bird down, even while it made me laugh, cry and want to hug my own son a little tighter and I would highly recommend it to anyone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2012

    Powerful & Relevant

    It is practically impossible to explain to someone who has not read this book why they should read it. I dont' even remember why I bought it, but I am so glad that I did. This is one of those rare books that makes you proud at one moment to be a human being and completely ashamed at others. The message between the lines is in large font bold print. Loving each other is a gift that we all should share.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2012

    This book is an obnxious, misogynistic rant. The author is one

    This book is an obnxious, misogynistic rant. The author is one of these delusional people who thinks that money and influence were going to be able to save his child from an inevitable death (the child was born with a heart having only one ventricle). He name drops thoughout the book and allows his son and friends to look at what are supposed to be confidential applications (and make disparaging comments about applicants pictures). He makes insulting comments about how the female doctors look. He becames irate when a doctor takes a weekend off and does not provide him with her home phone number. Columbia Presbyterian hospital needed to call security because of his abuse of the staff. He is suing the hospital because his child died after a heart transplant (and of course somebody needs to pay for that). By the end of this book you end up having no sympathy for the child that died or the family left behind.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1