Customer Reviews for

In an Uncertain World: Tough Choices from Wall Street to Washington

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2004

    Insightful and analytical

    This is a very useful read. The book provides deep insight into the analysis and difficulty associated with making economic policy, and will hopefully contribute to efforts to deepen debate over the role of government in economic terms. I think many will be shocked by how volatile the international financial markets really are. Beyond the economic issues, Rubin provides lots of insight into the essential differences in government decision-making vs. business decision-making which eludes to the many problems associated with 'privatizing' the government. But the book is dull, and Rubin himself appears unusually dull. The attempts at humor in the book seem forced and uncomfortable. Having spent most of his life in financial services companies, he has rarely/never invested in the markets because he does not feel that the risks are manageable. From this perspective it is difficult for him to pass himself off as a visionary, and therefore 'Rubinomics' seems to be more of a reiteration of traditional macroecomics that something truly new. While some would like more saucy secrets about the Clintons, I was most disappointed with his complete omission of a discussion of the two issues of why he joined Citi and the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act. It is difficult to imagine that he was for repeal of the act based on his other views, and Citi was the principal short-term benefactor of the repeal. This along with his controversial phone call from Citi to treasury requesting intervention from the US government in support of Citi's interests in Enron is highly questionable, and I think the book would have provided a lot if he had gone into this. I would strongly encourage reading this book for its intellectual value.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2004

    A must read for ALL.

    Globalization, budget deficits, trade deficits! What does all this mean and how does it affect YOU! This is a must read book for everyone! It examines the importance of global policy and how poor economic policies will cost the future of America. You might not agree with everything he says, but it is a book that easily leads you into the realm of politics/economics. I don¿t think Rubin¿s main goal of the book is to demonstrate what is right and wrong when it comes to economic policies. His main goal is to get people involved in these issues and not let political sweet talks result in bad economic decisions that affects our future.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2004

    A Must-Read for Serious Students of the Economy

    This book is at once (a) a story of Robert Rubin's career; (b) an exciting rendition of the ideas, meetings, and actions that guided us through several very frightening economic crises that arose on Rubin's watch; and (c) Rubin's views of what is needed to make the world a better place. For me, the (b) aspect was the most fun. No mathematics appear in the book, but a mathematical background on the part of the reader is helpful in understanding some of the ideas and discussion relative to the use of economic parameters, and ideas pertaining to probability estimates. In general, Liberals will probably like Rubin's take on the nature and consequences of the interaction of economics and politics, and Conservatives will not. But the problems were real, and the stories about how they were addressed are exciting and educational. It is obvious throughout the book that Rubin admires President Clinton's intellect and his ability to bond with people. Clinton's personal shortcomings are discussed only to an extent that gives the story flow. The other side of Clinton, the one that was able to fathom the concepts and understand the crises well enough to provide solid guidance at several key junctures, has probably been underappreciated. If the Bush tax cuts end up generating enough revenues to make up for them, then we may be able to say that some of Rubin's reservations about the dangers of supply-side economics are unwarranted. But it may take 10 years to find out.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2012




    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2004

    A bland apologetic book

    Rubin¿s observations of the financial markets are generally informative but dull. Disappointedly, his political biases color the usefulness of the book. He is a Clinton apologist of the first order. More space is devoted in the book to his fly-fishing than Clinton¿s impeachment trial, the events leading up to it and the impact it had upon the country. Yet, much space is devoted to criticizing those opposing his socio-economic views. All in all, a forgettable book with little new to offer.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1