Customer Reviews for

In the Company of Soldiers: A Chronicle of Combat

Average Rating 3.5
( 20 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Modern combat as viewed from the division command level

Rick Atkinson was assigned as an embedded reporter with the command element of the 101st airborne division for the 2003 Iraqi war. He spent most of his time with the division commander, general Patraeus and his staff. This is not a chronicle of heavy combat, but an inte...
Rick Atkinson was assigned as an embedded reporter with the command element of the 101st airborne division for the 2003 Iraqi war. He spent most of his time with the division commander, general Patraeus and his staff. This is not a chronicle of heavy combat, but an interesting look at what it takes to deploy, supply, and direct a division into combat. There were many problems to be overcome. Sand wrecked equipment, sometimes food and water were in short supply, and the Iraqi soldiers continually changed their methods of attack forcing the US forces to adjust their tactics. The command also had to take advantage of opportunities as they were presented, but be cautious due to the nature of the 101st; light infantry without heavy weapons or armor. Though not on a par with 'An Army at Dawn', it is an insightful look at the responsibilities and decision making processes at the top.

posted by Anonymous on March 29, 2004

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

'Instant History' Not To Be Confused With The Real Thing

Rick Atkinson, one of our nation's most distinguished military historians, produces a uncharacteristically mediocre travelogue about the Iraq War. I found this book, along with all of the other Iraq instant histories out there, to be of questionable historical value. At...
Rick Atkinson, one of our nation's most distinguished military historians, produces a uncharacteristically mediocre travelogue about the Iraq War. I found this book, along with all of the other Iraq instant histories out there, to be of questionable historical value. Atkinson's modus operandi in IN THE COMPANY OF SOLDIERS makes this book suspect even among the other instant histories currently clogging bookstore shelves. He simply followed the General in charge of the Army's 101st Airborne around for a month during the war, resulting in a 'and then we left location X and arrived at location Y'-type narrative structure. While this makes for interesting journalism, it falls far short of the standards of History set by Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers (incidentally, about the 101st in WWII) or Mark Bowden's Black Hawk Down. There is precious little fact checking or external corroboration involved with this book. It is merely the war seen through a soda straw. IN THE COMPANY OF SOLDIERS lacks the breadth, poise and authoritativeness that laborious interviewing, research and long hours spent in the archives produces. The book also suffers from a ailment common to much recent military journalism: being overly-impressed by rank and taking high-ranking officers at their word. (Enlisted soldiers are treated like children by Atkinson: they are seen but rarely heard). The best historians (e.g. Studs Turkel, Michael Herr, Stephen Ambrose) stake their claim by examining the plight of the common man caught up in uncommon circumstances. They talk to the grunts on the frontlines. Generals are, for the most part, politicians in uniform and Atkinson's book suffers as a result of his almost deliberate higher headquarters myopia. The title oughta be IN THE COMPANY OF A WEST POINT GRADUATE.

posted by Anonymous on March 13, 2004

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 20 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2004

    Modern combat as viewed from the division command level

    Rick Atkinson was assigned as an embedded reporter with the command element of the 101st airborne division for the 2003 Iraqi war. He spent most of his time with the division commander, general Patraeus and his staff. This is not a chronicle of heavy combat, but an interesting look at what it takes to deploy, supply, and direct a division into combat. There were many problems to be overcome. Sand wrecked equipment, sometimes food and water were in short supply, and the Iraqi soldiers continually changed their methods of attack forcing the US forces to adjust their tactics. The command also had to take advantage of opportunities as they were presented, but be cautious due to the nature of the 101st; light infantry without heavy weapons or armor. Though not on a par with 'An Army at Dawn', it is an insightful look at the responsibilities and decision making processes at the top.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2005

    very good book

    i liked the book a lot. It was though lacking first hand accounts of the battles fought.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2004

    'Instant History' Not To Be Confused With The Real Thing

    Rick Atkinson, one of our nation's most distinguished military historians, produces a uncharacteristically mediocre travelogue about the Iraq War. I found this book, along with all of the other Iraq instant histories out there, to be of questionable historical value. Atkinson's modus operandi in IN THE COMPANY OF SOLDIERS makes this book suspect even among the other instant histories currently clogging bookstore shelves. He simply followed the General in charge of the Army's 101st Airborne around for a month during the war, resulting in a 'and then we left location X and arrived at location Y'-type narrative structure. While this makes for interesting journalism, it falls far short of the standards of History set by Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers (incidentally, about the 101st in WWII) or Mark Bowden's Black Hawk Down. There is precious little fact checking or external corroboration involved with this book. It is merely the war seen through a soda straw. IN THE COMPANY OF SOLDIERS lacks the breadth, poise and authoritativeness that laborious interviewing, research and long hours spent in the archives produces. The book also suffers from a ailment common to much recent military journalism: being overly-impressed by rank and taking high-ranking officers at their word. (Enlisted soldiers are treated like children by Atkinson: they are seen but rarely heard). The best historians (e.g. Studs Turkel, Michael Herr, Stephen Ambrose) stake their claim by examining the plight of the common man caught up in uncommon circumstances. They talk to the grunts on the frontlines. Generals are, for the most part, politicians in uniform and Atkinson's book suffers as a result of his almost deliberate higher headquarters myopia. The title oughta be IN THE COMPANY OF A WEST POINT GRADUATE.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2004

    Good Writing - Bad Politics

    The author spared no punches at constantly giving his personal disapproving opinion on the politics of this war. It almost reads as a Democratic Campaign leaflet against the Bush Administration¿s war in Iraq. It is horribly biased against the reasons for going to war. Atkinson makes it a point in almost every chapter to show how wrong and inept the Bush Administration¿s policies are. In the author¿s impressions of casual conversations, the attitude of the young men and women in the 101¿st appear to also be very negative as to the reasons they are in Iraqi and fighting the war. I would not recommend this book if you supported the war in Iraq.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    Why was this book written?

    The title should be In The Company Of A General or Traveling With A General In Iraq. I guess Mr. Atkinson needed some money while he wrote his next book.

    A Chronicle of Combat. Really.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 11, 2011

    Breath taking!

    As a fellow soldier it was nice to see what was going on in the war room while we were out on the front lines, it was very detailed about that!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2005

    An other Victory For Rick Atkinson

    This is one of the best books and most informative about war since The Long Gray Line. Atkinson's style of writing is enjoyable. Keep it up.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2004

    Comes out shooting blanks

    Atkinson's well written An Army At Dawn compelled me to purchase this book and I was thoroughly dissapointed. In the Company...is viewed solely from the perspective of the commanding level and lacks the intimacy of front line accounts. In addition to the stand off tone Atkinson also interjects his own political take on the administration and events in Washington. This was supposed to be a book about a man joining the men and women of the 101st and telling their account of the Iraqi war, not Atkinson's. Altogether dissapointing and lackluster.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2004

    Well worth reading

    As an embedded journalist with the 101st Airborne (¿Band of Brothers¿ fame), Pulitzer Prize winning correspondent and military historian Richard Atkinson provides a deep look at the Iraq War from the perspective of the American troops. Though the concentration is more on the field grade officers, no one seems to have been left out of this effort. Readers learn how the soldier sees things whether it is equipment and supply shortages or overages (sounds contradictory, but is a big concern) or the individual and group safety in a hostile environs. Mr. Atkinson furbishes insight from the moment the division is called up to leave Fort Campbell to deploy to the desert until the capture of Baghdad when the author returns to the states................................. Military history buffs will realize that the author salutes the army for their superb efforts to win a war while fighting nature and preventing civilian casualties though not all went well. IN THE COMPANY OF SOLDIERS: A CHRONICLE OF COMBAT is clearly anti this war yet fully supportive of the soldiers that the books raves about as courageous, sincere, and capable. Mr. Atkinson condemns the administration for lack of logistical planning and for its rationale for armed combat (being revised by the winners to we did right removing an abusive dictator; if that was the cause then the administration should have taken that thesis to the American people). Rumsfeld bashing aside, Mr. Atkinson clearly congratulates the deserving 101st with a twenty-one gun salute......................... Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 20 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1