Customer Reviews for

In the Name of Honor

Average Rating 3.5
( 85 )
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(34)

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Sort by: Showing all of 19 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted March 26, 2012

    Couldn't put it down!

    Loved the books and the author

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A RIVETING COURTROOM DRAMA - AUDIO EDITION

    Little pulls in and holds a reader more effectively than a stunning opening, which is precisely what Richard North Patterson has done with IN THE NAME OF HONOR. Captain Paul Terry receives an early morning phone call, "There's been a shooting at Fort Bolton - one officer killed another."

    As if that weren't shocking enough the shooter was Brian McCarran. This was a killing that would "reverberate all the way to the Pentagon, where the family's most revered member, Anthony McCarran, served as chief of staff of the army." Terry, an attorney, is just shy of leaving the service for a plush job with a Wall Street firm, but he has been called to help Brian in what is sure to be not only a headline grabbing case but a heartbreaking one as well.

    The dead soldier is Joe D'Abruzzo, Brian's commanding officer in Iraq and married to Kate Gallagher who has been almost like a sister to Brian. Both of the men have changed since returning from duty. Brian has been traumatized by his experiences, and Joe has been withdrawn, guarded. It was as if at times he were a stranger.

    When Brian receives a phone call from Kate revealing that Joe has become violently abusive, he determines that he will protect her. But one night Joe comes to Brian's apartment and their confrontation ends in death. Brian claims that Joe attacked him, although he is unable to remember large parts of the evening. Paul will defend him using PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder) as his defense.

    Meanwhile, Brian's sister, Meg, has arrived from San Francisco. She's a highly intelligent attorney who insists on serving as co-counsel in order to save her brother. Hidden secrets are revealed as the process continues.

    Readers of Patterson's work know that he's a pro at creating riveting courtroom drama - for this reader IN THE NAME OF HONOR is some of his best work. Obviously, Patterson has researched PTSD assiduously as we find when Paul makes his case. With that plus the war in Iraq readers will find much to ponder as the suspense builds to a highly surprising ending.

    A well experienced voice performer John Bedford Lloyd offers a clear, concise reading which is not only easy to hear and understand but adds tension to the courtroom scenes. The impact of those sections is so dramatic that the most powerful narration a voice performer can present is almost one of dispassion, allowing the listener to envision the scenes. Lloyd's reading is tense, never tentative, which is a perfect foil for this tale.

    - Gail Cooke

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 14, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A RIVETING COURTROOM DRAMA

    Little pulls in and holds a reader more effectively than a stunning opening, which is precisely what Richard North Patterson has done with IN THE NAME OF HONOR. Captain Paul Terry receives an early morning phone call, "There's been a shooting at Fort Bolton - one officer killed another."

    As if that weren't shocking enough the shooter was Brian McCarran. This was a killing that would "reverberate all the way to the Pentagon, where the family's most revered member, Anthony McCarran, served as chief of staff of the army." Terry, an attorney, is just shy of leaving the service for a plush job with a Wall Street firm, but he has been called to help Brian in what is sure to be not only a headline grabbing case but a heartbreaking one as well.

    The dead soldier is Joe D'Abruzzo, Brian's commanding officer in Iraq and married to Kate Gallagher who has been almost like a sister to Brian. Both of the men have changed since returning from duty. Brian has been traumatized by his experiences, and Joe has been withdrawn, guarded. It was as if at times he were a stranger.

    When Brian receives a phone call from Kate revealing that Joe has become violently abusive, he determines that he will protect her. But one night Joe comes to Brian's apartment and their confrontation ends in death. Brian claims that Joe attacked him, although he is unable to remember large parts of the evening. Paul will defend him using PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder) as his defense.

    Meanwhile, Brian's sister, Meg, has arrived from San Francisco. She's a highly intelligent attorney who insists on serving as co-counsel in order to save her brother. Hidden secrets are revealed as the process continues.

    Readers of Patterson's work know that he's a pro at creating riveting courtroom drama - for this reader IN THE NAME OF HONOR is some of his best work. Obviously, Patterson has researched PTSD assiduously as we find when Paul makes his case. With that plus the war in Iraq readers will find much to ponder as the suspense builds to a highly surprising ending.

    - Gail Cooke

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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Sort by: Showing all of 19 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
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