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Induced After-Death Communication: A New Therapy for Healing Grief and Trauma

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2006

    Great book on Therapy for Healing Grief

    ¿I am a psychologist and work with many people in grief. I have found Dr. Botkin¿s book to be very helpful. The book is written in a thorough and clear manner, and he presents many cases that support his conclusions. At first I was rather skeptical, but when I started using Dr. Botkin¿s IADC therapy it became immediately clear that my patients were experiencing profound healing. I now use this new therapy for all of my patients who are struggling with grief or the effects of trauma. I highly recommend this book to all therapists who work with patients who are in grief. This book, however, was not written just for therapists, and the general reader will find comfort and hope in this remarkable book.'

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2006

    A Must- Have For Anyone who feels guilt, pain or anger due to the death of somebody

    ¿I am a psychologist and work with many people in grief. I have found Dr. Botkin¿s book to be very helpful. The book is written in a thorough and clear manner, and he presents many cases that support his conclusions. At first I was rather skeptical, but when I started using Dr. Botkin¿s IADC therapy it became immediately clear that my patients were experiencing profound healing. I now use this new therapy for all of my patients who are struggling with grief or the effects of trauma. I highly recommend this book to all therapists who work with patients who are in grief. This book, however, was not written just for therapists, and the general reader will find comfort and hope in this remarkable book.'

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2005

    Induced After-Death Communication: A New Therapy for Healing Grief and Trauma

    This book scientifically presents the discovery of a controversial new treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, insistent grief, and trauma. This book is an in-depth study of a new process of healing. If anything, its author, Dr. Allan Botkin, Psy.D., invites you to leave your preconceptions, fears, and judgments at the door. Which, by the way, is no easy task when you are talking about talking to the dead IADC (Induced After Death Communication) is a therapeutic healing technique that requires the use of EMDR, a proven tool for therapists employed to reduce the intensity of intrusive memories. While using this technique, Dr. Botkin discovered the IADC as he searched for new ways to relieve war veterans of the life-altering pain associated with their often-horrifying experiences in the field. As a result most, but not all, of the case studies in this book are male. All are from diverse professional, experiential, and religious backgrounds. In 3000 plus real cases--all occurring in the therapist¿s office--98% of the vets in the hospital had an IADC, compared with 70% of the civilians. Still, that is a robust number. Remarkably in case after case, patients insist that their experiences communicating with a deceased loved one are real, that they are not dreams or hallucinations. The universality of these experiences is impressive. Across the board, IADC therapy is shown to resolve feelings of intense grief, guilt, anger, and sadness replacing them with contentment, happiness, and a sense that the loved one is well. In addition, Dr. Botkin¿s research shows that the effects hold up over time. The book is a frank scientific discussion-- objective, non-judgmental, and yet compassionate. And though it cannot help but confront our individual notions about death and dying, Dr. Botkin does a superb job of easing you out of that old uniform and asks you gently to hang it in the closet for a while. His research shows that personal beliefs have no effect on outcome, that your beliefs are irrelevant. It is also obvious that the first reviewer, George Odencrantz, did not grasp the major importance of this book to the healing arts.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2005

    Induced After-Death Communication: A New Therapy for Healing Grief and Trauma

    This book scientifically presents the discovery of a controversial new treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, insistent grief, and trauma. Although the title begs for a lengthy and raucous discourse on the after-life, mysticism, the paranormal, or just the blatantly spooky, it is not about that. This book is an in-depth study of a new process of healing. If anything, its author, Dr. Allan Botkin, Psy.D., invites you to leave your preconceptions, fears, and judgments at the door. Which, by the way, is no easy task when you are talking about talking to the dead. Obviously reviewer George Odencrantz did not understand the importance of this book. IADC (Induced After Death Communication) is a therapeutic healing technique that requires the use of EMDR, a proven tool for therapists employed to reduce the intensity of intrusive memories. While using this technique, Dr. Botkin discovered the IADC as he searched for new ways to relieve war veterans of the life-altering pain associated with their often-horrifying experiences in the field. As a result most, but not all, of the case studies in this book are male. All are from diverse professional, experiential, and religious backgrounds. In 3000 plus real cases--all occurring in the therapist¿s office--98% of the vets in the hospital had an IADC, compared with 70% of the civilians. Still, that is a robust number. Remarkably in case after case, patients insist that their experiences communicating with a deceased loved one are real, that they are not dreams or hallucinations. The universality of these experiences is impressive. Across the board, IADC therapy is shown to resolve feelings of intense grief, guilt, anger, and sadness replacing them with contentment, happiness, and a sense that the loved one is well. In addition, Dr. Botkin¿s research shows that the effects hold up over time. The only flaw with Dr. Botkin¿s book is that there are just too many case studies. But, really, that just may be the best thing this book has to offer the skeptics. Induced After Death Communication: A New Therapy for Healing and Trauma is structured like a textbook but it is gently written and conversational in tone. It is a frank scientific discussion-- objective, non-judgmental, and yet compassionate. And though it cannot help but confront our individual notions about death and dying, Dr. Botkin does a superb job of easing you out of that old uniform and asks you gently to hang it in the closet for a while. His research shows that personal beliefs have no effect on outcome, that your beliefs are irrelevant. Dr. Botkin fully understands what he is up against professionally and socially. He clearly states late in the book, ¿ If there is no afterlife, which would mean that IADC¿s are pure hallucination, then perhaps our brains did evolve a hidden healing savant that reveals itself at times of great personal need such as when we approach death or suffer the death of a loved one. If the healing savant exists, then all of us have the capacity to heal.¿ To Botkin, tapping into that constitutes a major breakthrough, one that should be fully explored. To him IADC is within the realm of possibility. He has put his skepticism aside for the sake of healing and I suggest you do the same. His evidence is convincing and who really knows after all?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2005

    Induced After-Death Communication: A New Therapy for Healing Grief and Trauma

    Induced After Death Communication: A New Therapy for Healing and Trauma scientifically presents the discovery of a controversial new treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, insistent grief, and trauma. The Barnes and Noble book review by George Odencrantz is totally unfounded and way off track. Although the title begs for a lengthy and raucous discourse on the after-life, mysticism, the paranormal, or just the blatantly spooky, it is not about that. This book is an in-depth study of a new process of healing. If anything, its author, Dr. Allan Botkin, Psy.D., invites you to leave your preconceptions, fears, and judgments at the door. Which, by the way, is no easy task when you are talking about talking to the dead. IADC (Induced After Death Communication) is a therapeutic healing technique that requires the use of EMDR, a proven tool for therapists employed to reduce the intensity of intrusive memories. While using this technique, Dr. Botkin discovered the IADC as he searched for new ways to relieve war veterans of the life-altering pain associated with their often-horrifying experiences in the field. As a result most, but not all, of the case studies in this book are male. All are from diverse professional, experiential, and religious backgrounds. In 3000 plus real cases--all occurring in the therapist¿s office--98% of the vets in the hospital had an IADC, compared with 70% of the civilians. Still, that is a robust number. Remarkably in case after case, Patients insist that their experiences communicating with a deceased loved one are real, that they are not dreams or hallucinations. The universality of these experiences is impressive. Across the board, IADC therapy is shown to resolve feelings of intense grief, guilt, anger, and sadness replacing them with contentment, happiness, and a sense that the loved one is well. In addition, Dr. Botkin¿s research shows that the effects hold up over time. The only flaw with Dr. Botkin¿s book is that there are just too many case studies. But, really, that just may be the best thing this book has to offer the skeptics. Induced After Death Communication: A New Therapy for Healing and Trauma is structured like a textbook but it is gently written and conversational in tone. It is a frank scientific discussion-- objective, non-judgmental, and yet compassionate. And though it cannot help but confront our individual notions about death and dying, Dr. Botkin does a superb job of easing you out of that old uniform and asks you gently to hang it in the closet for a while. His research shows that personal beliefs have no effect on outcome, that your beliefs are irrelevant. Dr. Botkin fully understands what he is up against professionally and socially. He clearly states late in the book, ¿ If there is no afterlife, which would mean that IADC¿s are pure hallucination, then perhaps our brains did evolve a hidden healing savant that reveals itself at times of great personal need such as when we approach death or suffer the death of a loved one. If the healing savant exists, then all of us have the capacity to heal.¿ To Botkin, tapping into that constitutes a major breakthrough, one that should be fully explored. To him IADC is within the realm of possibility. He has put his skepticism aside for the sake of healing and I suggest you do the same. His evidence is convincing and who really knows after all?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 20, 2011

    Hopeful and beautiful

    I am an everyday person interested in the subject of what happens when we "die" and unsatisfied with incomplete, though well-meaning religious doctrine. I have read a few dozens books on this topic. This is one of the best.

    This book - and the research that went into it - is credibly hopeful and beautiful. It shows that the largest force (of the universe?) is goodwill and love, despite our various, and sometimes tragic, failings as human beings.

    Highly recommended for anyone pained by loss. Especially those who caused the loss of a life by war, in battle, by accident. They may be able to forgive themselves...with tears, forgiveness, time.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2005

    Content is a promotional ad. for IADC Therapy

    I found this book to contain brief summaries of client cases and discussion relating to how IADC compares with other treatments. A list of definitions and web sites for trainging in IADC and one to locate those offering therapy. This book is a good example on how to get the public to pay for advertising your product!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
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