Customer Reviews for

Infernal Angels

Average Rating 4
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  • Posted February 8, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Another Excellent Amos Walker

    Estleman is at the top of his game here, riffing about Detroit the way Chandler did about LA in his Marlowe novels. Only a writer with imagination would use digital TV signal converter boxes as the basis for a smuggling operation. The story doesn't let up and has no fat in it. Only the end let me down a bit.I suspect there is a sequel somewhere down the road. Amos Walker may be the last of the great hard-boiled PIs, May he live long and prosper (but not enough to retire).

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 28, 2011

    A great read.

    Amos Walker a good fast paced read.

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  • Posted July 11, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The twenty-first Amos Walker private investigative thriller is a great tale

    In Detroit Reuben Crossgrain owns Past Presence where "Everything you require for the Modern Regressive Lifestyle" is for sale. He hires private investigator Amos Walker to recover 25 stolen TV converter boxes that allow the owner to watch HDTV on an analog set. Amos who is technological delinquent is a bit shocked with the job because the loss barely covers his retainer.

    Walker works the mean streets of the Motor City seeking clues to the identities of the owners of these hot gizmos. However, the relatively easy inquiry turns nasty when his efforts reach his "friend" former Detroit police detective and current Homeland Security Operative Mary Ann Thaler. The case turns ugly when a key suspect and the person who lost the shipment are murdered; however that twist feels more at home to Walker than seeking gadgets he never heard of doing things to TV sets that should have rabbit ears. He begins to learn of a deadly heroin trafficking using Crossgrain's converter boxes.

    The twenty-first Amos Walker private investigative thriller (see The Left-Handed Dollar) is a great tale that provides the usual deep look at the shrinking city that some believe has died; the state has not announced the wake. The story line is vintage Walker as he gets beat up and beats up others while corpses provide plenty of business for undertakers and body bag manufacturers. Fans will enjoy this modern day noir as the anti techie hero works plans to charge his client for his medical bills.

    Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2014

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