Customer Reviews for

The Informers

Average Rating 3.5
( 40 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2012

    Sex, Drugs, and Moral Decay... Oh My!

    First, let me note, this is the first Ellis book I have ever finished. As a fan of Chuck Palahniuk, I feel like I should enjoy this author, but it has been a long and arduous path to finding something that kept me turning the pages. This collection of short stories and wonderfully shallow, mostly affluent narrators was just what I was looking for. The wretched and miserable lives kept me hooked. Then, when I felt that the narratives would never cross the line into deeply disturbing transgressive literature, chapter 10 and 11 rattled me to the core! I really enjoyed reading this collection; however, a couple of the stories did have me checking how many pages were left in the chapter more than once. It just goes to show that they can' t all be winners! Regardless, I suggest this collection to anyone who enjoys the genre. Now, I'll reward myself by catching the film adaptation on NetFlix, even if it does omit Chapter 10 (from what I hear).

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Not Ellis Best Work.

    This book was not that great, but not awful. It started out okay, but not thrilling. As the stories moved on some of them got thrilling. Some of the short stories were interesting,dark, & thrilling at it points. But some were also boring and tedious. For instance Anne stupid letters to some guy. That story was a waste of time. As for the vampire one that was pretty cool. I enjoyed that one alot. Even though I didn't think this books deserved top stars like his other books as Less than Zero, American Psyco & Lunar Park. But I'd recommend others to read it. Brett Easton Ellis has recaptured LA 80's scene beautifully in The Informers. His settings is one of the reasons why I love his novels.

    As for the people were narrorated the book didn't sound so good.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

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    YUPPIES AND ADDICTS AND VAMPIRES - OH, MY!

    In Ellis' fourth "novel," what we see is something like a novel, but lacking in narrative structure. "The Informers" is a collection of chapters only tangentially linked to one another through the social relationships of the protagonists. We catch vignettes of the usual Ellis-type suspects, including: a scandalous TV news anchor who's having an affair with a stepson, a heroin-addicted kidnapper who owes money to vampires, a woman trying to fall out of love to a drugged-out, yet beautiful man who's detached from both humanity and Earth as we know it, a philandering father who fails to find common ground with his son (who is one of Bateman's friends from American Psycho) through what few activities he has, a rock star who likes beating up on the groupies he has sex with, a Camden college student writing letters to a boy she's trying to fall out of love with (who might just be the main character from The Rules Of Attraction), and last (but certainly not least)... a carousing vampire who preys on adolescent club-going women.
    While most of these characters have some form of relationship to one another, it serves only as a link between one chapter and another in terms of a loose society. What these characters truly share in common is that they're rich, strikingly beautiful, unfettered by obligation and completely devoid of a moral compass. The ennui they encounter is a direct result of their traits, yet they can't quite put a finger on what's wrong. Prior to this novel, Ellis' best portrayal of this kind of socioeconomic moral depression was in his first novel, "Less Than Zero." Here, we see the idea developed even further, but at the expense of a coherent narrative, both across the book and within the chapters. Conflicts are presented, but rarely resolved in each chapter. As a "novel," the intensity of the chapters only escalates, though we see characters referenced in earlier chapters near the end. However, the seasoned Ellis reader will likely tell you that this unresolved ennui is not only deliberate, but entirely effective in this author's world. You are presented with spoiled non-heroes who have everything outside and nothing inside; when a problem occurs, it just keeps getting worse and no moral is gleaned or lesson learned. This brutal hopelessness and uncomfortable ambiguity is Ellis' comfort zone, and for this reason, "The Informers" largely succeeds.
    My only complaint with "The Informers" is that it is marketed as a novel. I truly believe that if people were to approach this read with the notion that each chapter is a separate experience, they would be more satisfied with it. I can't even imagine what the movie adaptation must be like, as this "novel" lacks the kind of narrative structure necessary for a coherent screenplay. then again, from what I've heard, the movie wasn't coherent! Nonetheless, if you read "The Informers" as a showcase of Ellis' short stories, I think you will be perfectly satisfied with what you read.

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  • Posted September 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    excellent audio.

    some audio books are cheesy and can really stain a good story. This is a GREAT reading. in Lunar Park, Ellis describes his own early works - Less Than Zero and The Informers as - "finely honed down minimalism" and "cinematic haiku." These are accurate descriptions. This bare-bones style makes this audio presentation very enjoyable. As a reader of minimalism a readers eyes flow over the page with ease - as a listener the simple, perfect word choices send solid images directly to the brain. this is read by Therese Plummer AND Christian Rummel. The two voice narration works well for The Informers, particularly because of the way the "story" is made up of several loosely related short stories which are presented like chapters. Also because some of first person narrative within the text is male, some is female.

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  • Posted May 20, 2009

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    I Also Recommend:

    Typical.

    This was one of my favorites from Bret Easton Ellis. Although, nothing can really beat the most hilarious of them all, "American Psycho".
    The Informers is a book that would probably take a couple times to read to fully understand the style of writing and the characters he sometimes skims over.
    It's not really that confusing or hard to read you just have to pay attention.
    Usually by the end of a chapter you will know what character, being he, she or them, the author was referring to or introducing to you. That's why you might have to read a chapter over again sometimes.
    The book seemed to always have me on my toes, the new characters, the old characters, I really had to follow the descriptions and settings carefully.
    For what it is, I recommend it to readers who like Bret Easton Ellis or Chuck Palahniuk.

    I also saw this movie in theaters, you would have to read the book to even grasp anything in the movie.
    A guy sitting behind me asks "What was that even about?"
    Although the whole thing is pointless, there is something enjoyable yet empty about it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2005

    Immensely messed up.

    Definitely the most bizarre of Ellis' 80s novels. Unlike <u>Less Than Zero</u>, where there was one main character, this book is told by different people leading different lives with different perspectives; but they all have something in common -- they're useless, morally-absent people with nothing to gain, lose, or abstain. The sad part is that these characters probably did exist in 80s LA and still exist now. You'd have to read it to truly understand.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2005

    A SUPERBLY PENNED VIEW OF THE DARK SIDE

    When a cast of vacuous, narcissistic, bronzed Californians indulges in whatever brings them pleasure, Bret Easton Ellis is at his sardonic, cynical best. Culled from sketches begun in 1983 and eventually filling several notebooks, 'The Informers' is more a tale of a group's flawed response to its culture than it is a picture of individuals. Impossibly empty, the characters are predominantly male students who spend little time at their studies. Flouting their parents' checkbooks, they drive expensive cars, wear extravagantly priced clothes, dine at the trendiest spots, and indulge in most forms of chemical escapism. Punctuated with dark metaphors, the author's text is hauntingly spare, offering no explanation for the characters' lives but simply presenting them. This leaves the readers to judge, gnash their teeth or gape in shocked surprise. There is room for shock. As in Ellis' 'American Psycho,' some very unpleasant descriptions of mayhem and murder are included. In an interview Mr. Ellis commented, 'What I've always been interested in as a writer is this idea of a group of people who seem to have everything going for them on the outside. Because of that, they have a lot of freedom. The theme of my fiction is the abuse of that freedom.' With his superior intellect and total mastery of his craft, Mr. Ellis presents his theme well. - Gail Cooke

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2002

    Eh...

    Definitely the worst from Ellis so far, but hey, 'twasn't too bad. The stories were interesting in their own respect, but some might feel an emptiness and a lack of closure after reading the book. Before reading this, go for The Rules of Attraction, Glamorama, or American Psycho.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2002

    A Waste of time...

    After seeing 'American Psycho' I thought that this book would be just as good if not better. At the beginning I started to like the book and identify with the characters. Then the 'I's' in each chapter kept changing and I didn't know if it was a male or a female half the time, so confusing. I didn't even finish the book, I wanted to just get to the end, but I couldn't take it any longer.

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