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Innocent

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

19 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

A Worthy Sequel - Movie Next ?

Scott Turow's novel 'Innocent' (2010) is the sequel to his 1987 novel 'Presumed Innocent.' In 'Innocent' (2010) Scott Turow still has the craft and high art of being the very best in creating a novel that is deeply layered and nuanced with the human complexities of inte...
Scott Turow's novel 'Innocent' (2010) is the sequel to his 1987 novel 'Presumed Innocent.' In 'Innocent' (2010) Scott Turow still has the craft and high art of being the very best in creating a novel that is deeply layered and nuanced with the human complexities of intelligence, emotion, love, revenge, ambition, and power. Turow has the ability to paint a literary masterpiece of the theatre of the mind and the courtroom. The formatting of a timeline (by Turow - in the novel) of an alleged crime (murder) and review of context between the past and the 'present' adds to the novel's strength and drama. The theme of relentless pursuit, and the dance between prosecution (Tommy Molto) and defense (Rusty Sabich) is akin to Melville's 'Moby Dick' such that it is a tangled web we weave - with one another - in our lives. In Turow's novel, the 'law' can exonerate - but the 'truth' can be as deep and unfathomable as the ocean. Turow writes for the reader and not for Hollywood (but I can see the film being developed already - Harrison Ford are you ready?)

posted by Odysseus-Redux on May 8, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

18 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

"Innocent" by Scott Turow

This story is a continuation of Turow's long ago "Presumed Innocent." While well-written, as are all of Turow's novels, it is bit confusing as it jumps back and forth through time. It also assumes that the reader will remember the original story.

posted by 3402033 on April 20, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2010

    "Innocent" by Scott Turow

    This story is a continuation of Turow's long ago "Presumed Innocent." While well-written, as are all of Turow's novels, it is bit confusing as it jumps back and forth through time. It also assumes that the reader will remember the original story.

    18 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

    Good Sequel

    Before John Grisham there was Scott Turow. Presumed Innocent was a pure legal thriller and I just started it sequel. To go off topic please stop complaing about the Nook because it has no place in the reviews.

    5 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 29, 2010

    Be patient reading this and you won't be disappointed.

    Although this is the sequel to Presumed Innocent, it is not necessary to have read that one first in order to enjoy Innocent. The characters are reintroduced and fully explored.
    A major issue with the book is that it took me about 185 pages to get drawn into it completely, but after that, it grabbed me tight and did not let go. There were still more than 200 pages to go, so don't give up if that happens to you.
    Morality, knowing right from wrong, the ability to resist temptation and common sense judgment are qualities often absent from the personalities of the main characters. They apparently have a different definition depending on which side of the argument or question they are standing.
    The courtroom trial will truly hold your interest and illustrate how easy it would be, or perhaps is, to convict someone of anything, even murder, using only circumstantial evidence even when they are really not guilty as charged. Rather than being presumed innocent, in our system, the presumption really seems to overwhelmingly indicate that the defendant is guilty once the arrest has been made. The attorneys seem more interested in winning their case, using any means, sleight of hand, pretense, innuendo, accidentally exposing a piece of unallowable evidence, even evidence tampering, rather than seeing justice served. You will not guess the ending until it is revealed in the final pages of the novel.
    If the book had held my interest from the start, I would have given it 4, not 3 stars, because overall, if one can read patiently until drawn into the plot, I highly recommend this book. The twists and turns make it hard to put down once you pass that point of no return.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2010

    amazing book

    amazing book

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 20, 2013

    Twenty years after he stood trial for the murder of his lover, C

    Twenty years after he stood trial for the murder of his lover, Carolyn Polhemus, Rusty Sabich, chief judge of the court of appeal and, at age 60, a candidate for the state Supreme Court, is again suspected of murder.

    As Innocent opens, Rusty is devastated by the sudden death of his wife, Barbara, who appears to have died of a heart attack. Upon waking to find his wife dead next to him, Sabich spends the next 23 hours sitting with her, cleaning the bedroom and making her presentable before calling their son, Nat. He doesn’t call the paramedics or the police.

    His unusual behavior draws the attention of the Prosecutor’s office which is now being run by Tommy Molto, who was the prosecutor in Sabich’s earlier trial and continues to believe in Sabich’s guilt for that crime.

    Meanwhile, months after Barbara dies, Molto and Brand find clues that make them suspect that Barbara’s death was not a natural one after all. The clues point to Rusty as the one who might have given her an overdose of medication.

    Innocent is very well set up and continues perfectly from Presumed Innocent. Turow’s descriptions were very captivating. You could picture everyone and everything that he wrote about.

    I found the first half or so of this book difficult to follow as each chapter went back and forth in time. At about the half way point, this stopped, and I enjoyed the story immensely.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2010

    a little disappointed

    I loved Presumed Innocent, so I was very excited to read this book. I did read the reviews and was not bothered by the time shifts like many others, but the ending was disappointing. The book is well written; it takes many twists and turns that keep you guessing; so when the end came I was left saying "Is that it???" What a let down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2012

    A good read

    A bit long but overall a good read.

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  • Posted June 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Great Return to Kindle County

    The rule of murder mysteries is that the author must establish a small set of characters and successfully carry a story with those characters so that each could plausibly have committed the crime. There are combinations that mix numbers from the set to establish certain rules of the fiction, or of the relationships between characters, and then, at the end, the set reveals its false bottom -- a new variable that meets all the definitions to have been included in the first place -- and out comes the legitimate killer. It's a math problem, when put to paper. This is how Turow's novels work anyway, and Innocent is a well done effort exactly in that vein: the reader is kept guessing, and, joyfully, never quite guesses right. This novel also benefits from its two strong predecessors -- Presumed Innocent and, in a better book with as much Sandy Stern as you could hope for, The Burden of Proof -- as well as the now iconic 1990 film with Harrison Ford, which frees Turow to play with the now-adult Nate and law clerk Anna Vostic as half-leads. All in all, it's an enjoyable ride -- the slow start in defining the set hits an excellent pace in the courtroom, and the book catches us up with a cast we've sorely missed. I could read another two or three novels set in Rusty's world, but I'm not sure we'll get that chance. (Original review posted at Goodreads.)

    (B&N really needs to adjust its review restrictions. The online form would not let me use the main character's last name because when you drop two letters, in can seem an offense term. Ridiculous censoring coming from a reputable bookstore. Grow up, B&N.)

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